National Awards

National, Merit-Based Scholarships and Fellowships

The Center for Careers, Life, and Service coordinates the application procedure for national, merit-based scholarships and fellowships requiring campus nominations. These scholarships are highly competitive and should not be considered substitutes for financial aid. Students with general financial-aid needs should contact the Financial Aid Office. International students should consult the list of scholarships for international students. Please contact Steve Gump, director of global fellowships and awards, with questions about any of the scholarships and fellowships detailed below.

Note that much of the text in the sections below has been copied and excerpted from the various scholarship and fellowship websites; always consult the original websites for complete and up-to-date details.

For Undergraduate or Postgraduate Education (Domestic or International)

Beinecke Scholarship

Campus deadline: Tuesday, January 20, 2015, at 5:00 p.m.

National deadline: Friday, February 20, 2015

For: graduate school funding in the arts, humanities, or social sciences

Scholarship URL: http://www.beineckescholarship.org/

The Beinecke Scholarship Program was established in 1971 by the Board of Directors of the Sperry and Hutchinson Company to honor Edwin, Frederick, and Walter Beinecke. The Board created an endowment to provide substantial scholarships for the education of young men and women of exceptional promise. The program seeks to encourage and enable highly motivated students to pursue opportunities available to them and to be courageous in the selection of a graduate course of study in the arts, humanities, or social sciences.

Each Beinecke Scholar receives $4,000 immediately prior to entering graduate school and an additional $30,000 while attending graduate school. There are no geographic restrictions on the use of the scholarship, and recipients are allowed to supplement the award with other scholarships, assistantships, and research grants. Scholars are encouraged to begin graduate study as soon as possible following graduation from college and must use all of the funding within five years of completion of undergraduate studies. Eligibility for the award is limited to students planning to attend graduate school in the arts, humanities, or social sciences.

Eligibility

To be eligible for a Beinecke Scholarship, a student must:

  • Have demonstrated superior standards of intellectual ability, scholastic achievement, and personal promise during his or her undergraduate career.
  • Be a college junior pursuing a bachelor’s degree during the 2014–2015 academic year. “Junior” means a student who plans to continue full-time undergraduate study and who expects to receive a baccalaureate degree between December 2015 and August 2016.
  • Plan to enter a master’s or doctoral program in the arts, humanities, or social sciences. Students in the social sciences who plan to pursue graduate study in neuroscience should not apply for a Beinecke Scholarship.
  • Be a United States citizen or a United States national from American Samoa or the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.
  • Have a documented history of receiving need-based financial aid during his or her undergraduate years. Primary evidence of meeting this criterion is a student’s history of receiving need-based institutional, state, or federal grants-in-aid. An institutional financial aid officer will be required to complete a Financial Aid Data Sheet certifying that the student meets this criterion. The amount or level of financial need demonstrated by the student will be one of the factors considered during the selection process, and preference is given to candidates for whom the awarding of a scholarship would increase the likelihood of the student’s being able to attend graduate school. If you received merit-based scholarships or awards that replaced need-based aid, then you may also be eligible.

Application Process

Grinnell may annually nominate one student for this award. Students interested in applying for Grinnell’s nomination for the Beinecke Scholarship should submit the following elements to the Center for Careers, Life, and Service, 1127 Park St., by the campus deadline noted above:

  • Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver.
  • A completed application form.
  • A completed Financial Aid Data Sheet, completed in collaboration with (and signed by) Grinnell's Financial Aid office.
  • Current resume. Please visit the CLS for assistance with your resume (if you have not done so previously).
  • A personal statement of 1,000 words or fewer describing your background, interests, plans for graduate study, and career aspirations. The statement should include a discussion of some experiences and ideas that have shaped those interests, plans, and aspirations.
  • Three letters of recommendation from faculty members that assess your intellectual curiosity, character, and potential for advanced graduate study.
  • An unofficial copy of your Grinnell transcript.

For the on-campus nomination process, please ensure all application documents comply with these submission guidelines. Applicants should also review this advice on writing personal statements and advice from Joe Schall on writing personal statements.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Past Scholars

Grinnell College nominees who have won the Beinecke Scholarship are:

  • Mateo Jarquín (2012)
  • Holly Lutwitze (2007)
  • Ilana Meltzer (2004)
  • Rachel L. Melis (2000)
  • Jonathan C. Edel (1998)
  • Sarah J. Purcell (1991)
Churchill Scholarship

Campus deadline: Monday, October 6, 2014, at 5:00 p.m.

National deadline: Tuesday, November 11, 2014

For: graduate study at the University of Cambridge

Scholarship URL: http://www.winstonchurchillfoundation.org/index.html

Established in 1959, the Winston Churchill Foundation was founded by American friends of Churchill who wanted to fulfill his wish of always having young American graduate students at Churchill College at the University of Cambridge. The Foundation’s Scholarship Program offers U.S. citizens of exceptional ability and outstanding achievement the opportunity to pursue graduate studies in engineering, mathematics, or the sciences at Cambridge. One of the newer colleges at the University of Cambridge, Churchill College was built in tribute to Winston Churchill, who in the years after the Second World War presciently recognized the growing importance of science and technology for prosperity and security. Churchill College thus focuses on the sciences, engineering, and mathematics. The first Churchill Scholarships, three in number, were awarded in 1963 and funded one year of study. There have now been some 430 Churchill Scholars, and eight Churchill Fellows have gone on to win the Nobel Prize.

At least fourteen Churchill Scholarships are offered annually. The one-year awards lead to the Master of Philosophy (MPhil), the Certificate of Post-Graduate Study (CPGS, in a only a few fields of study), or the Master of Advanced Study in Mathematics (MASM, formerly known as CASM, the Certificate of Advanced Study in Mathematics). The Scholarship is tenable for nine, ten, or twelve months, depending on the academic program. The Churchill Scholarship is worth between $42,000 and $48,000, depending on the exchange rate. It covers all University and College tuition and fees (currently about $25,000). In addition, Churchill Scholars receive a living allowance of £10,000 if enrolled in a nine-month academic program, £12,000 if enrolled in an eleven-month academic program, and £13,000 if enrolled in a full-year academic program. They receive an allowance of up to $1,000 for travel to and from the United Kingdom, reimbursement of applications fees for a UK visa, and a personal travel allowance of $500 to allow scholars to travel around the UK, in Europe, or farther afield.  The Foundation also offers the possibility of a Special Research Grant of up to $2,000; this grant may cover travel for presentations at international conferences, short stays at another university or institute for special research, and other activities. Married students should consult with the Foundation about additional support.

Eligibility

An applicant for the Churchill Scholarship must be a citizen of the United States, either native born or naturalized, and must be a senior who is enrolled in one of the institutions participating in the Scholarship Program or a student who has recently graduated from one of those institutions. (Grinnell is a participating institution.) Upon taking up the Churchill Scholarship, a Churchill Scholar must be between the ages of 19 and 26, must hold a bachelor’s degree or an equivalent, and may not have attained a doctorate.

Selection Criteria

The criteria for the selection of Churchill Scholars include:

  • Exceptional academic talent and outstanding achievement, especially in the major, as indicated by course grades. The Foundation does not require a minimum GPA, but recent Churchill Scholars have had a GPA of at least 3.7 and usually have 3.9 or above.
  • A capacity to contribute to the advancement of knowledge in the sciences, engineering, or mathematics by pursuing original, creative work at an advanced level as demonstrated by awards, prizes, research, and letters of recommendation. Applicants in the sciences and engineering will demonstrate extensive laboratory experience, internships, or other related work, while applicants in mathematics will show substantial independent work or other projects.
  • Outstanding personal qualities. Understanding the time commitment required by research, the Churchill Foundation does not seek so-called well-rounded applicants; instead, it seeks applicants with what we call interesting “jagged edges.” Nonetheless, it should be noted that successful applicants display a bewildering array of talents activities outside of academic pursuits, especially in music, athletics, and social service (among other activities).

The Winston Churchill Foundation of the United States is committed to a policy against discrimination based on sex, sexual orientation, gender, marital or parental status, race, color, religion, national origin, or disability or any other characteristic protected by law.

Application Process

Grinnell may annually nominate one student for this award. Students interested in applying for Grinnell’s nomination for the Churchill Scholarship should submit the following elements to the Center for Careers, Life, and Service, 1127 Park St., by the campus deadline noted above:

  • Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver.
  • A completed application form.
  • Three letters of recommendation from faculty members that assess your intellectual curiosity, character, and potential for advanced graduate study. (Please note that the Grinnell’s nominee will also need to submit a fourth letter of recommendation in support of his or her application. Applicants should identify who would write that fourth letter and talk with that individual about the timeline for submission of this letter.)
  • A letter of interest or commitment from a director of a laboratory at Cambridge, if available and if relevant.
  • An unofficial copy of your transcript.
  • Transcripts from other institutions attended.
  • Graduate Record Examination Scores (from the General Test).
  • A personal statement of 1,000 words or fewer describing your background, interests, plans for graduate study, and career aspirations. The statement should include a discussion of some experiences and ideas that have shaped those interests, plans and aspirations.

For the on-campus nomination process, please ensure all application documents comply with these submission guidelines. Applicants should also review this advice on writing personal statements as well as this advice from Joe Schall on writing personal statements.

Applicants must also apply for graduate admission to Cambridge by their October deadline.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Application Alternative

If studying abroad at Cambridge interests you, you might also consider applying for the Gates Scholarship (see below).

Gates Scholarship

Campus deadline (for endorsement): None

National deadline for U.S. citizens in the USA: Wednesday, October 15, 2014

National deadline for other eligible candidates: Tuesday, December 2, 2014

For: graduate study at the University of Cambridge

Scholarship URL: http://www.gatescambridge.org/

Gates Cambridge Scholarships are highly competitive full-cost awards for fulltime graduate study and research in any subject available at the University of Cambridge. The purpose of the Gates Cambridge Trust, established in 2000, is to enable Gates Cambridge Scholars from any part of the world outside the United Kingdom to benefit from education in the University of Cambridge. Gates Cambridge Scholarships are awarded on the following criteria:

  • Intellectual ability
  • Leadership capacity
  • A person’s desire to use their knowledge to contribute to society throughout the world by providing service to their communities and applying their talents and knowledge to improve the lives of others
  • A good fit between the abilities and aspirations of the applicant and what the University of Cambridge can offer in its graduate program

While at Cambridge, Gates Scholars pursue the full range of academic disciplines and are spread throughout all 31 Colleges. All applicants for the scholarship apply for—and must gain—admission to the University of Cambridge.

Eligibility

Candidates for a Gates Cambridge Scholarship:

  • may be citizens of any country outside the United Kingdom;
  • may apply to study any subject available at the University of Cambridge;
  • may apply to pursue one of the following fulltime residential courses of study:

– PhD (three year research-only degree),

– one-year postgraduate course (e.g., MPhil, LLM, MASt, Diploma, MBA, etc.),

– MSc or MLitt (two-year research-only degree);

  • must be admitted to one of the degrees above at Cambridge through the University’s normal admission procedures;
  • must be well prepared for the Cambridge course for which they are applying and must meet all of the conditions for admission specified by the University (e.g., academic, English language proficiency, if required, and any other conditions set); and
  • must be able to show evidence of high academic achievement, leadership potential, social commitment, and a good fit with Cambridge.

Students who are already studying at Cambridge are eligible to apply for a Gates Cambridge Scholarship only if they are applying for a new course of study (e.g., a one-year ‘MPhil only’ student may apply for funding to continue on to the PhD). Candidates already studying at Cambridge who are not applying for a new course of study (e.g., have already started their PhD) are not eligible to be considered for a Gates Cambridge Scholarship.

Application Process

Please consult these two pages at the Gates Cambridge website: How to Apply and Deadlines.

The Gates Scholarship does not require institutional nomination or endorsement from Grinnell College. Although students are not required to work with advisors at Grinnell on their application, they are encouraged to meet with Steve Gump to review the opportunity offered by the Gates Cambridge Scholarship, to discuss a potential application, and to review their application materials.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Application Alternative

If studying abroad at Cambridge interests you, you might also consider applying for the Churchill Scholarship (see above).

Goldwater Scholarship

Campus deadline: Monday, November 17, 2014, at 5:00 p.m. Please do NOT submit your application online via the Goldwater Scholarship application portal. See below for how to submit your application by the campus deadline.

National deadline: Friday, January 23, 2015

For: undergraduate funding for U.S. students intending research careers in mathematics, the natural sciences, or engineering

Scholarship URL: https://goldwater.scholarsapply.org/index.php

The Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship Foundation will award undergraduate scholarships to outstanding students, to be known as Barry M. Goldwater Scholars, in the spring of 2015 for use during the 2015–2016 academic year. The awards will be made on the basis of merit to two groups of students—those who will be college juniors and those who will be college seniors in the 2015–2016 academic year—who have outstanding potential and intend to pursue careers in mathematics, the natural sciences, or engineering. Four-year institutions are eligible to nominate up to four students who are in the sophomore or junior class during the 2014–2015 academic year. Each scholarship covers eligible expenses for undergraduate tuition, fees, books, and room and board, up to a maximum of $7,500 annually. Scholarship monies not used during one academic year are not transferable to the succeeding academic year. Junior-level scholarship recipients are eligible for a maximum of two years of scholarship support, and senior-level scholarship recipients are eligible for a maximum of one year of scholarship support.

The Trustees intend to award up to 300 Goldwater Scholarships. The number of scholarships to be awarded per state will depend on the number and qualifications of the resident nominees from the 50 states; the District of Columbia; Puerto Rico; and, considered as a single entity, Guam, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. The word “resident” as used in this context refers to a person who has legal residence in the state from which he or she is a candidate. This status might be indicated by parents’ place of residence. If that criterion of residence is not relevant, the candidate’s legal residence will be determined by his or her eligibility for in-state tuition rates (where applicable) and place of voter registration.

Eligibility

To be considered for nomination as a Goldwater Scholar, a student must:

  • Be a fulltime matriculated sophomore or junior pursuing a degree at an accredited institution of higher education during the 2014–2015 academic year. “Sophomore” is defined as a student who plans two more years of fulltime undergraduate study beginning after August or September 2015. Sophomore nominees can expect to receive a maximum of two years of support. Students in two-year colleges who plan to transfer to a baccalaureate program at another institution may be nominated. “Junior” is defined as a student who plans one more year of fulltime undergraduate study beginning after August or September 2015. Junior nominees can expect to receive a maximum of one year of support.
  • Have a college grade-point average of at least “B” (or the equivalent) and be in the upper fourth of his or her class. (Note: Though the Goldwater Scholarship requires only a 3.0 average, the typical winning applicant has a GPA in the 3.9 range.)
  • Be a United States citizen, a permanent resident, or, in the case of nominees from American Samoa or the Commonwealth of the Mariana Islands, a United States national. Nominations from permanent residents must include a letter of the nominee’s intent to obtain U.S. citizenship and a photocopy of the Permanent Resident Card (formerly known as the Alien Registration Card).

Selection Criteria

Successful Goldwater candidates usually meet most or all of the following selection criteria:

  • Outstanding academic work, reflected in a top-notch GPA and backed by superlative letters of recommendation.
  • A demonstrated interest in a research career.
  • Intensive scientific research experience, usually more than one summer’s worth. Many candidates have one experience on-campus (e.g., a MAP) and one off-campus (e.g., an REU).
  • A desire to complete a terminal degree within their chosen academic field, almost always a Ph.D.

Application Process

To be considered for one of Grinnell’s four annual nomination spots for this scholarship, please submit one copy of the following materials to the Center for Careers, Life, and Service, 1127 Park St., by the campus deadline noted above:

  • A completed application form, which should be begun online via the Goldwater Scholarship website and then printed. IMPORTANT: Please do not officially submit your application online. Instead, download your application as a .pdf and print out a hard copy.
  • An essay describing your research plans, as detailed in the application form.
  • Three letters of recommendation, which may be submitted via email to gumpstev[at]grinnell[dot]edu or in hard-copy form to 1127 Park St.
  • An unofficial transcript from Grinnell College, obtained from the Registrar’s Office (do not simply print out a grade report from PioneerWeb).
  • Any transcript(s) from other institutions you attended with grades for courses taken.
  • A completed Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver.

Please ensure that all materials for the on-campus nomination process conform with these submission guidelines.

Goldwater Scholarship candidates are encouraged to read and follow this Goldwater application advice.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Marshall Scholarship

Campus deadline: Tuesday, September 2, 2014, at 5:00 p.m.

National deadline: Wednesday, October 1, 2014

For: graduate school funding for U.S. citizens at any UK institution

Scholarship URL: http://www.marshallscholarship.org/

Marshall Scholarships finance young Americans of high ability to study for a degree in the United Kingdom. Up to forty Scholars are selected each year to study at graduate level at a UK institution in any field of study. As future leaders, with a lasting understanding of British society, Marshall Scholars strengthen the enduring relationship between the British and American peoples, their governments and their institutions. Marshall Scholars are talented, independent, and wide-ranging, and their time as Scholars enhances their intellectual and personal growth. Their direct engagement with Britain through its best academic programs contributes to their ultimate personal success. The objectives of the Marshall Scholarship program are as follows:

  • To enable intellectually distinguished young Americans, their country’s future leaders, to study in the UK.
  • To help Scholars gain an understanding and appreciation of contemporary Britain.
  • To contribute to the advancement of knowledge in science, technology, the humanities and social sciences, and the creative arts at Britain’s centers of academic excellence.
  • To motivate Scholars to act as ambassadors from the USA to the UK and vice versa throughout their lives, thus strengthening British-American understanding.
  • To promote the personal and academic fulfilment of each Scholar.

The award provides for university fees, cost of living expenses, annual book grant, thesis grant, research and daily travel grants, fares to and from the United States, and, where applicable, a contribution toward the support of a dependent spouse.

The traditional Marshall Scholarship is tenable for two academic years (i.e., 22 months) but may be extended by the Commission, though not beyond the end of a third academic year. Third-year extensions are granted by the Commission on a limited basis, for strong academic reasons, subject to the availability of funds. (Thanks to the generosity of the schools themselves, students pursuing doctorates at the following institutions are eligible for third-year extensions without special petitions: Edinburgh, London School of Economics and Political Science, Nottingham, Oxford, St Andrews.)

One-Year Marshall Scholarships, tenable for 12 months and not eligible for extension, are also available.

Eligibility

To be eligible for a 2015 Marshall Scholarship, candidates must:

  • be citizens of the United States of America (at the time they apply for a scholarship);
  • hold their first undergraduate degree from an accredited four-year college or university in the United States by the time they take up their scholarship in September 2015;
  • have obtained a grade point average of not less than 3.7 (or A-) on their undergraduate degree (exceptions will be considered only on the specific recommendation of the sponsoring college);
  • have graduated from their first undergraduate college or university after April 2010; and
  • not have studied for (or hold) a degree or degree-equivalent qualification from a British University.

Evaluation Criteria

Marshall Scholarship applications will be evaluated on three criteria:

  • Academic Merit (quality of program of study, knowledge of proposed courses and supervisors, evidence of academic background that is strong and relevant, quality and breadth of recommendations)
  • Leadership Potential (ability to deliver results, strength of purpose, creativity, self-awareness)
  • Ambassadorial Potential (knowledge of US-UK relations, evidence of transferrable extracurricular activities, interpersonal skills and ability to engage with others, self-confidence, and ability to seize opportunities)

Application Process

Please consult this page at the Marshall Aid Commemoration Commission website: Applying for a Marshall Scholarship.

Applications are made in one of eight regions in the United States. Candidates may apply in one region only: either that in which they have their permanent home address or ordinary place of residence/employment, or that in which they are studying. (Please consult with Steve Gump to discuss the pros and cons of applying in the regions in which you may be eligible, since, year to year, competitiveness varies from region to region.)

To be considered for a Grinnell College endorsement for this scholarship, please submit the following materials to the Center for Careers, Life, and Service, 1127 Park St., by the campus deadline noted above:

In addition, you will need to complete the following components online by the same campus deadline:

  • A completed online application.
  • Three letters of recommendation from faculty members that assess your intellectual curiosity, character, and potential for advanced graduate study. These should be submitted via the Marshall Scholarship online application. Please note that Grinnell’s nominees for the Marshall Scholarship will need to submit a fourth letter of recommendation as a part of the national selection process. This fourth letter-writer should be identified on your on-campus application for nomination.

For the on-campus endorsement process, please ensure all application documents comply with these submission guidelines.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Mitchell Scholarship

Campus deadline: Tuesday, September 2, 2014, at 5:00 p.m.

National deadline: Wednesday, October 1, 2014, at 4:00 p.m.

For: graduate school funding for U.S. citizens at any of the 9 universities in Ireland

Scholarship URL: http://www.us-irelandalliance.org/content/3/en/George%20Mitchell%20Scholarship%20Program%20%7C%20US-Ireland%20Alliance.html

The Mitchell Scholars Program is a nationally competitive fellowship sponsored by the US-Ireland Alliance. The Mitchell Scholars Program, named to honor former U.S. Senator George Mitchell’s pivotal contribution to the Northern Ireland peace process, is designed to introduce and connect generations of future American leaders to the island of Ireland, while recognizing and fostering intellectual achievement, leadership, and a commitment to public service and community. Up to twelve Mitchell Scholars between the ages of 18 and 30 are chosen annually for one year of postgraduate study in any discipline offered by institutions of higher learning in Ireland and Northern Ireland. Applicants are judged on three criteria: scholarship, leadership, and a sustained commitment to service and community. The Mitchell Scholars Program provides tuition, housing, a living expenses stipend, and an international travel stipend.

Eligibility

Candidates for the 2015–2016 Mitchell Scholars program must meet all criteria. They shall:

  • Be U.S. citizens (permanent residents and U.S. Nationals are not eligible).
  • Be 18 years of age or older, but not yet 30.
  • Have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university before beginning study as a Mitchell Scholar. Degrees from international accredited universities are acceptable, if all other conditions are met.
  • While married applicants are accepted, no allowance is made for the expenses of a married applicant’s spouse or dependent.

Award

Potential candidates are urged to study the Frequently Asked Questions and the profiles of past Scholars to learn about the program, the selection process, and the qualities sought in a Mitchell Scholar. Because the Mitchell program has only twenty national finalists for a maximum of twelve awards, we ask that upon accepting an invitation to finalist weekend, a candidate be committed to participating in all aspects of finalist weekend and to accepting an offer from the Mitchell Scholars program if tendered. The Mitchell Scholars Program includes support for one year of study at a university on the island of Ireland. Those who prefer a multi-year academic scholarship should apply for other fellowship programs which offer multi-year awards.

Application

Please consult this page at the US-Ireland Alliance website: Applying to the Mitchell Scholarship Program.

A candidate who is a full-time student at the time of application must present an institutional endorsement. Candidates must be endorsed by an institution where they have been enrolled for two years of full-time study before October 1 of the year in which they are applying (undergraduate transfer students entering their second year at an institution may secure endorsement from their current institution). Applications for Mitchell Scholarships must be submitted to and endorsed by an accredited U.S. college or university.

To be considered for a Grinnell College endorsement for the Mitchell Scholarship, please submit the following materials to the Center for Careers, Life, and Service, 1127 Park St., by the campus deadline noted above:

  • A completed Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver.
  • A printed version of your online application. There is no “unsubmit” button for the Mitchell Scholarship; do NOT press “submit” prior to the campus deadline. You will have an opportunity to continue working on your application after the on-campus nomination process is complete—but note that you must NOT ask for assistance with your application essay. You will be required to affirm that your essay is entirely your own work by signing the following: “I attest that this essay is my own work and is wholly truthful. Neither it nor any earlier draft has been edited by anyone other than me, nor has anyone else reviewed it to provide me with suggestions to improve it. I understand that any such editing or review would disqualify my application.”
  • Three letters of recommendation from faculty members that assess your intellectual curiosity, character, and potential for advanced graduate study. Please note that nominees will need to submit a total of four letters as a part of the national selection process; in your on-campus application, you should indicate who your other letter-writer will be.
  • An unofficial copy of your transcript.
  • A copy of transcripts from any other institutions attended.

For the on-campus nomination process, please ensure all application documents comply with these submission guidelines. Applicants should also review this advice on writing personal statements, as well as refer to this advice from Joe Schall on writing personal statements.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellowship

National deadline: Friday, January 16, 2015, at 10:59 p.m.

For: undergraduate and graduate school funding (or just graduate school funding) for U.S. citizens intending to enter the U.S. Foreign Service

Scholarship URL: http://woodrow.org/fellowships/pickering/

 

Please check this space later for deadlines and other details. In the meantime, feel free to inquire with Steve Gump about this fellowship.

Rhodes Scholarship

Campus deadline: Tuesday, September 2, 2014, at 5:00 p.m.

National deadline: Wednesday, October 1, 2014, at 10:59 p.m.

For: graduate study at the University of Oxford

Scholarship URL: http://www.rhodesscholar.org/

The Rhodes Scholarships, the oldest international educational fellowships, were initiated after the death of Cecil Rhodes in 1902, and bring outstanding students from many countries around the world to the University of Oxford. The first American Scholars entered Oxford in 1904, and an alumnus of Grinnell College was part of that inaugural class of Rhodes Scholars (see list below). American Rhodes Scholars are selected through a decentralized process by which regional selection committees choose 32 Scholars each year representing the 50 states. To date, applicants from more than 300 American colleges and universities have been selected as Rhodes Scholars. In most years, even after a century of competition, a Rhodes Scholar is selected from an institution which has not formerly supplied a successful applicant.

Extraordinary intellectual distinction is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for election to a Rhodes Scholarship. Selection committees are charged to seek excellence in qualities of mind and in qualities of person which, in combination, offer the promise of effective service to the world in the decades ahead. The Rhodes Scholarships, in short, are investments in individuals rather than in project proposals. Accordingly, applications are sought from talented students without restriction as to their field of academic specialization or career plans, although the proposed course of study must be available at Oxford, and the applicant’s undergraduate program must have provided a sufficient basis for study in the proposed field. Through the years, Rhodes Scholars have pursued studies in all of the varied fields available at the University of Oxford.

Election to the Scholarship is normally for two or three years, depending upon the degree program pursued by the Scholar. A Scholarship, including required University and college fees and a stipend for living expenses, may be renewed, at the complete discretion of the Rhodes Trustees, for a third year for those pursuing a doctoral degree and whose progress is deemed satisfactory. For those for whom the University requires fees in a fourth year for the completion of a doctorate, and when no other external funding is offered, again at the discretion of the Trustees, those fees will be paid, although not an additional stipend. (College and University jobs are often available to those remaining in Oxford in such fourth years.) The Trustees will not pay fourth-year fees in either the Division of the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences or the Division of Medical Sciences, as Scholars may enter directly to work for a doctorate in these divisions in three years. Scholars applying for a master’s degree in one of these two science divisions should not, therefore, expect to be able to use the scholarship to go on to a doctorate.  Rhodes Scholars may not apply for the MBA or the Master in Financial Economics (MFE) in their first year but may pursue either of these one-year degrees in their second year, following the completion of a different one-year master’s degree.

All educational costs, such as matriculation, tuition, laboratory and certain other fees, are paid on the Scholar’s behalf by the Rhodes Trustees. Each Scholar receives in addition a maintenance allowance adequate to meet necessary expenses for term-time and vacations. The Rhodes Trustees cover the necessary costs of travel to and from Oxford. Mr. Rhodes’ Will contains four criteria by which prospective Rhodes Scholars are to be selected:

  • literary and scholastic attainments;
  • energy to use one’s talents to the full, as exemplified by fondness for and success in sports;
  • truth, courage, devotion to duty, sympathy for and protection of the weak, kindliness, unselfishness, and fellowship;
  • moral force of character and instincts to lead, and to take an interest in one’s fellow beings.

Underlying these standards is the aim that Scholars be physically, intellectually, and morally capable of leadership, that is, persons who, in Mr. Rhodes’ phrase, will “esteem performance of public duties as [their] highest aim.” From this statement one may infer he expected his Scholars to play an influential part in the betterment of society, wherever their careers might lead them. Much of the distinctiveness of the Rhodes Scholarships stems from this comprehensive set of criteria. Intellectual excellence is obviously required, but not in isolation of other qualities. Mr. Rhodes sought Scholars who were more than “mere bookworms”; he wanted their intellectual talents to be combined with concern for others. Thus the Selection Committees assign the highest importance to this blend of character with intellect.

Grinnell College’s Nomination Process

All individuals wishing to seek Grinnell College nomination should carefully and thoroughly review the Rhodes Scholarship website, and all questions about the scholarship should be directed to Steve Gump. To be considered for a Grinnell College nomination for the Rhodes Scholarship, please submit the following materials to the Center for Careers, Life, and Service, 1127 Park St., by the campus deadline noted above:

  • A printed version of the completed Rhodes Scholarship application form, which can be completed online. Candidates for Grinnell’s endorsement should list President Raynard Kington as the author of their letter of endorsement in the online application.
  • A personal statement, adhering to these guidelines from the Rhodes Trust: “A signed short personal statement describing the applicant’s academic and other interests. This statement should describe the specific area of proposed study and the applicant’s reasons for wishing to study at Oxford, and it must conclude with the following signed statement: ‘I attest that this personal statement is my own work and is wholly truthful. Neither it nor any earlier draft has been edited by anyone other than me, nor has anyone else reviewed it to provide me with suggestions to improve it. I understand that any such editing or review would disqualify my application.’ This personal essay must not exceed 1,000 words (approximately four double-spaced pages) and should be written in as simple and direct a manner as possible. It should be set in a typeface no smaller than 10 points. Selection Committees will place special emphasis on this personal essay, and it will be forwarded to Oxford colleges to which Rhodes Scholars-elect apply for admission.” Note that the rule about outside assistance is firm: Although you may discuss the general contents of your personal statement with others, DO NOT ask anyone to review drafts of your personal statement at any time. (See also advice on writing personal statements and advice from Joe Schall on writing personal statements.)
  • “A succinct pertinent list of principal activities and honors in college (including prizes, scholarships, offices held; athletic record; extracurricular interests and substantial activities) with dates. This must not exceed two pages in length, and should be set in a typeface no smaller than 10 points.”
  • An unofficial copy of your Grinnell College transcript, which may be obtained from the Registrar’s Office. A grade report printed off from PioneerWeb is not acceptable.
  • A signed copy of the Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver.
  • Three letters of recommendation must be submitted by the campus deadline. These should be submitted directly to the Center for Careers, Life, and Service. Please note that you do not need to have the full 5–8 letters of recommendation required for the national selection process submitted by the campus deadline; only three letters are required at this time. However, applicants must indicate on their application form who else would write letters of recommendation if they are nominated.

A photograph of the applicant is not required at the campus application level.

Please ensure that all documents submitted for the on-campus nomination process comply with these guidelines

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Grinnell College Rhodes Scholars, 1904–present

  • Kendra (Young) Harris ’02
  • David White ’90
  • Susan Duffey Campbell ’78
  • Thomas W. Merril ’71
  • Grant E. Crandell ’69
  • Duane Krohnke ’61
  • John R. Price ’60
  • George A. Drake ’56
  • Neil L. Crone ’25
  • Maxwell H. Herriot ’19
  • James H. St. John 1914
  • Paul G. Williams 1913
  • William A. Ziegler 1910
  • Joseph G. Walleser 1903
Rotary Foundation Scholarship

National deadline: Wednesday, July 1, 2015 (for Rotary Peace Fellowships)

For: graduate study or research abroad

Scholarship URL: http://www.rotary.org/

Please check this space later for deadlines and other details. In the meantime, feel free to inquire with Steve Gump, a 1999–2000 Rotary Foundation Scholar to the University of Wales, about these fellowship opportunities.

 

Schwarzman Scholarship (coming in 2015)

Campus deadline: Forthcoming in 2015

National deadline: Forthcoming in 2015

For: graduate study at Tsinghua University

Scholarship URL: http://schwarzmanscholars.org/

Designed to inspire the next generation of global leaders, Schwarzman Scholars is the most significant program of its kind since the Rhodes Trust was founded in 1902. With a $350 million endowment, it will also be the single largest philanthropic effort ever undertaken in China by largely international donors.

The 200 scholars chosen annually for this highly selective program will work towards a one-year Master’s Degree at Tsinghua University in Beijing—one of China’s most prestigious universities. As individuals who want to have a positive impact on the world, the Stephen A. Schwarzman Scholars will be selected based on their academic credentials, extracurricular interests and leadership potential.

During their stay, students will be given access to a privileged range of cultural and academic experiences, from travel to all corners of China to exchanges with global leaders and mentorship with experts in their chosen discipline. They will also spend their year immersed in the local economy and social life—before classes begin, a summer orientation will provide opportunities to learn Chinese, explore Beijing and meet fellow students and faculty.

The first class of Schwarzman Scholars will matriculate in 2016, and scholars will be selected from the United States (90), China (40), and the rest of the world (70). Check this space in 2015 for details on the application process; also check periodically with the foundation website for updates if you are interested in applying for this opportunity.

 

Soros Fellowship for New Americans

National deadline: Saturday, November 1, 2014

For: graduate study in the United States

Scholarship URL: http://www.pdsoros.org/

 

Please check this space later for additional details. In the meantime, feel free to inquire with Steve Gump about this fellowship.

 

 

Truman Scholarship

Campus deadline: Monday, September 8, 2014, at 5:00 p.m.

National deadline: Tuesday, February 3, 2015, at 10:59 p.m.

For: graduate study for U.S. citizens who intend to become “change agents”

Scholarship URL: http://www.truman.gov/

The Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation—the federal memorial to our thirty-third president—awards merit-based scholarships to college students who plan to pursue careers in government or elsewhere in public service. Truman Scholars receive up to $30,000 for graduate or professional school, participate in leadership development activities, and have special opportunities for internships and employment with the federal government. Truman Scholars take part in the Truman Scholars Leadership Week, which gives scholars the chance to meet other like-minded students from across the nation; learn more about graduate school and scholarship opportunities; interact with past scholars and career public servants; and undertake a community service project. Some Truman Scholars are also able to take part in the Summer Institute after graduation, which includes a nine-week internship in Washington, DC; seminars in public policy; workshops; and social activities with other Truman Scholars. Twenty-four of the Scholars will also be selected to work in DC for one year after graduation as a part of the Truman-Albright Fellows Program, which includes a year-long public service position and graduate-level seminars in public policy. Truman Scholars also bypass the written section of the Foreign Service Officer examination and move directly to the oral exam.

The Foundation defines public service as employment in government at any level, uniformed services, public-interest organizations, nongovernmental research and/or educational organizations, public and private schools, and public service-oriented nonprofit organizations such as those whose primary purposes are to help needy or disadvantaged persons or to protect the environment. The Foundation seeks persons who aspire for positions in government or the nonprofit and advocacy sectors where they wish to improve the ways in which federal, state, or local government agencies, educational institutions, and nonprofit organizations serve the public and protect resources. The Foundation has supported Truman Scholars in many fields of study, including agriculture, biology, engineering, environmental management, physical and social sciences, and technology policy, as well as in traditional fields such as economics, education, government, history, international relations, law, political science, public administration, nonprofit management, public policy, and public health. Past Truman Scholarship winners serve as managers of government programs, legislators and aides for legislative bodies, Foreign Service officers, school teachers, staff members in policy analysis and research organizations, attorneys for government agencies, public defenders, professors, and professional staff in advocacy organizations and not-for-profit institutions to serve the disadvantaged or to protect the environment.

In 2015, one scholarship will be available to a qualified resident nominee in each of the 50 states; the District of Columbia; Puerto Rico; and, considered as a single entity, the islands of Guam, Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. (Residency is generally determined by home address for school registration, family's primary residence, and voter registration.) The Foundation may also select up to 15 at-large Scholars. The award may be used only for tuition, fees, books, room and board, or other specifically approved expenses. Payments from the Foundation may be received to supplement, but not to duplicate, benefits from the educational institution or from other foundations, institutions, or organizations. The combined benefits from all sources may not exceed the costs of tuition, fees, books, and room and board as prescribed by the institution. Scholars may defer, for up to four years, Foundation support for their graduate studies after completion of their undergraduate studies. Scholars in graduate study programs supported by other means and Scholars in the Armed Forces may request additional years of deferral.

Scholars are required to work in public service for three of the seven years following completion of a Foundation-funded graduate degree program as a condition of receiving funding. Scholars who are not employed in public service for a total of three years, or who fail to provide proof to the Foundation of such employment, will be required to repay any funds received along with interest. The Foundation will have an appeals process for those Scholars in special circumstances.

Eligibility

To be eligible for Grinnell College’s nomination for a Truman Scholarship, you must meet the following minimum eligibility standards:

  • Be a college junior. Please note that Grinnell normally nominates students during the spring of their second year. Students in the Class of 2016, however, will be applying for nomination in early fall 2014.
  • Be a strong student academically. The Truman Foundation requires that students be in the top quarter of their graduating class. Because Grinnell does not rank students by GPA, in general this means that we nominate students with GPAs of 3.3 and above.
  • Have a commitment to a career in public service, as defined above.
  • Be a United States citizen or a United States national from American Samoa or the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Resident aliens (green card holders) are not eligible.

Common Characteristics of Successful Truman Applicants

  • Accomplished, proven, and effective leaders
  • People who have taken or shown initiative by starting or exploding organizations or ideas
  • Vision and creativity
  • Interest in policy or solutions at a systemic level
  • Interest in politics or political means to an end
  • Intelligent, articulate, and well-versed in a variety of topics
  • Energetic

The Truman Scholarship website has an excellent list of FAQs for applicants, which should be reviewed by all interested applicants.

Nomination Process

If you are on campus this fall, please plan to attend the Truman Scholarship Information Session on Wednesday, August 27, from 8:00–9:00 p.m. at ARH 120.

All individuals wishing to seek Grinnell College nomination should carefully and thoroughly review the Truman Scholarship website, and all questions about the scholarship should be directed to Steve Gump. To be considered for one of Grinnell’s four nominations for members of the Class of 2016, please submit the following materials to the Center for Careers, Life, and Service, 1127 Park St., by the campus deadline noted above:

  • A completed Grinnell College Truman Scholarship Nomination Application. Please note that this is a .pdf document that may be completed using Adobe Acrobat. However, unless you have a full version of Acrobat, you might not be able to save your work. For the short-answer questions, you should compose your answers using a word processing program, then cut and paste into the text boxes.
  • An unofficial copy of your Grinnell College transcript, obtained from the Registrar (please do not simply print a copy off from PioneerWeb).
  • A copy of your four-year academic plan.
  • A completed Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver.
  • A current resume which includes the following information, as appropriate and relevant: public service/community service; jobs/internships; awards/scholarships/publications; leadership positions; other activities. Please visit the CLS for assistance with your resume (if you have not done so previously).

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

National Application Preparation

Because the Truman Scholarship’s national application is quite extensive and in-depth, Grinnell’s four nominees from the Class of 2016 will meet weekly as a group with Steve Gump throughout the fall semester of 2014 to work on completing it. This commitment is big; past nominees have compared the experience to being the equivalent of a 2-credit course. Nominees will be expected to write short answers on a near-weekly basis; read and comment on one another’s work; and conduct research on their topic of interest, for their policy proposal, and about possible graduate education courses. Nominees should expect to spend two to five hours per week preparing their application throughout the fall semester. Nominees who are abroad during this time will be integrated into the group as possible via technology.

Value of the Application Process

Although the Truman Scholarship application process is quite intensive and time-consuming, nominees will be constantly encouraged to focus on the benefits of the process of applying. Here is an opportunity to think seriously about who you are, what you have accomplished, what your life goals are, and what is important to you. Nominees also have the chance to think seriously about graduate school, to conduct in-depth research on a topic of particular interest to them, and to hone and practice their interviewing skills. Regardless of whether the nominee is named as a finalist or wins the Truman Scholarship, our aim is for the process to justify the amount of work that goes into producing a high-quality application. Applicants also benefit by having the opportunity to work closely with and get to know three peers who are similarly interested in and dedicated to careers in public service.

Recent Grinnell College Truman Nominees, Finalists, and Scholars

2013–14

  • Opeyemi Awe (finalist)
  • Lilianna Bagnoli
  • Anna Banker (finalist)
  • Keaton Cameron-Burr

2012–13

  • Cynthia Amezcua
  • Brian Buckley (finalist)
  • Leah Lucas (finalist)
  • Jeremy Sanchez

2011–12

  • Anika Manzoor (finalist)
  • Amanda Muskat (finalist)
  • Charity Porotesano (scholar)
  • Jenny Peek (finalist)

2010–11

  • Claire Griffith
  • Joe Maloney
  • Annie Tomlinson (finalist)
  • Thomas Van Heeke

2009–10

  • Aaron Barker
  • Claire Branigan
  • Allison Brinkhorst
  • Rebecca Heller

2008–09

  • Winnon Brunson, Jr. (finalist)
  • Hart Ford-Hodges
  • Caitlin Galer-Unti
  • Jacob Reisberg (finalist)

2007–08

  • Tommy Jamison
  • Dan LaFountaine
  • Alec Schierenbeck (scholar)
  • Emily Stiever (finalist)

2006–07

  • Linn Davis (finalist)
  • Hannah Garden-Monheit (finalist)
  • Christina Reynolds
  • Mary Pat Twomey

2005–06

  • Katie Jares (scholar)
  • Elena Rubin
  • Kristin Snavely
  • Ben Weyl (finalist)

2004–05

  • Jenny Dale (finalist)
  • Vashti Davis
  • Jason Rathod
  • Eli Zigas (scholar)

 

Udall Scholarship

Campus deadline: Tuesday, January 20, 2015, at 5:00 p.m.

National deadline: Wednesday, March 4, 2015

For: undergraduate scholarships for select students (based on demographics or areas of interest)

Scholarship URL: http://www.udall.gov/OurPrograms/Scholarship/Scholarship.aspx

In 2014, the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation expects to award 50 scholarships of up to $5,000 and 50 honorable mentions on the basis of merit to sophomore and junior level college students in any of three categories:

  • students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to the environment;
  • Native American and Alaska Native students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to public policy; or
  • Native American and Alaska Native students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to Native health care.

The Udall Foundation seeks future leaders across a wide spectrum of environmental fields, including policy, engineering, science, education, urban planning and renewal, business, health, justice, and economics. The Foundation also seeks future Native American and Alaska Native leaders in public and community health care, tribal government, and public policy affecting Native American communities, including land and resource management, economic development, and education.

Eligibility

In order to apply for the Udall Scholarship, students must meet the following eligibility criteria:

  • Be a matriculated sophomore or junior-level student at a two-year or four-year institution of higher education, pursuing a bachelor’s or associate’s degree during the 2014–2015 academic year. “Sophomore” is defined as a student who intends at least two more years of fulltime undergraduate study beginning in fall 2015. “Junior” is defined as a student who intends at least one more year of full-time undergraduate study beginning in fall 2015. (Students may apply for funding in both their sophomore and junior years; third-time applicants, however, will not be eligible.)
  • Be committed to a career related to the environment, OR committed to a career in tribal public policy OR Native American health care (only Native Americans and Alaska Natives are eligible to apply in tribal public policy or Native American health care). Native American students studying tribal public policy or native health do not need to demonstrate commitment to the environment. Likewise, students pursuing environmentally related careers do not need to be Native American, nor do they need to demonstrate commitment to tribal public policy or Native health.
  • Have a college grade-point average of at least a “B” (3.0) or the equivalent.
  • Be pursuing full-time study during the 2015–2016 academic year.
  • Be a U.S. citizen, U.S. national, or U.S. permanent resident.

Application Process

Second- and third-year students who are interested in applying for one of Grinnell’s six nominations for the Udall Scholarship must file a preliminary application to the Center for Careers, Life, and Service, 1127 Park St., consisting of the following elements by the campus deadline listed above:

  • A cover sheet that includes the applicant’s name, e-mail address, mailing address (campus and home), phone number, class year, major, advisor, and country of citizenship.
  • A one-page resume which details, among other qualifications, the applicant’s commitment to topics related to the environment. Please visit the CLS for assistance with your resume (if you have not done so previously).
  • An unofficial copy of your Grinnell College transcript.
  • A two-page essay in which you describe in more detail one or more of the following: (A) Why you are interested in a career related to the environment; (B) A leadership activity you have undertaken; (C) An experience which led you to be committed to the environment; (D) Public service activities related to the environment you have undertaken; or (E) Future career plans.
  • A completed Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver.
  • Applicants may, if they choose, submit a completed Udall Scholarship application instead of the documents listed above (however, all applicants must submit an unofficial transcript and the Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver). Taking this route requires more work, but it gives students a jump-start on completing the national application.

Please ensure that all documents submitted for Grinnell's on-campus nomination process comply with these guidelines.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

 

For Study Abroad

 

Boren Scholarship

Campus deadline: Monday, January 26, 2015, at 5:00 p.m.

National deadline: Wednesday, February 4, 2015, at 4:00 p.m.

For: study abroad funding for U.S. students planning careers in national security

Scholarship URL: https://www.borenawards.org/boren_scholarship

Boren Scholarships provide up to $20,000 to U.S. undergraduate students to study abroad in areas of the world that are critical to U.S. interests and underrepresented in study abroad, including Africa, Asia, Central & Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin American, and the Middle East. The countries of Western Europe, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand are excluded. See the complete list of countries.

Boren Scholars come from a variety of academic backgrounds, but all are interested in studying less commonly taught languages, including but not limited to Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, and Swahili. See the complete list of languages.

Boren Scholarships are funded by the National Security Education Program (NSEP), which focuses on geographic areas, languages, and fields of study deemed critical to U.S. national security. Applicants should identify how their study abroad program, as well as their future academic and career goals, will contribute to U.S. national security, broadly defined. NSEP draws on a broad definition of national security, recognizing that the scope of national security has expanded to include not only the traditional concerns of protecting and promoting American well-being, but also the challenges of global society, including sustainable development, environmental degradation, global disease and hunger, population growth and migration, and economic competitiveness.

Maximum scholarship awards are $8,000 for a summer, 10,000 for a semester, and $20,000 for a full academic year.

Boren Scholarships promote long-term linguistic and cultural immersion, and therefore study abroad proposals for two or more semesters are strongly encouraged. Preference will be given to undergraduate applicants proposing a full-year academic study. Summer-only programs must be eight weeks or more and are limited to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics students. Boren-funded programs can begin no earlier than June 1, 2015.

National Security Requirement

The program focuses on geographic areas, languages, and fields of study deemed critical to U.S. national security. It draws on a broad definition of national security, recognizing that the scope of national security has expanded to include not only the traditional concerns of protecting and promoting American well-being but also the challenges of global society, including sustainable development, environmental degradation, global disease and hunger, population growth and migration, and economic competitiveness. All applicants must demonstrate how their study programs and future goals are connected to this broad understanding of national security.

The NSEP Service Requirement stipulates that an award recipient work in the Federal Government in a position with national security responsibilities. The Departments of Defense, Homeland Security, State, or any element of the Intelligence Community are priority agencies. If an award recipient demonstrates to NSEP that no appropriate position is available in one of these agencies, the award recipient must seek to fulfill the requirement in a position with national security responsibilities in any Federal department or agency. Approval of service outside of a priority agency is contingent upon satisfactory demonstration of a full and good faith effort in accordance with conditions established by NSEP. If an award recipient demonstrates to NSEP that no appropriate position is available in the Federal Government, the award recipient may petition NSEP to fulfill the requirement. The education option is available only after exhausting all opportunities to fulfill the requirement in the Federal Government in accordance with conditions established by NSEP. The duration of the NSEP Service Requirement is one year or the duration of assistance provided under the program, whichever is longer. Boren Scholars must begin fulfilling the service requirement within three years of graduation. The website provides more details and a list of Frequently Asked Questions about the NSEP Service Requirement.

Program Preferences

Boren Scholarships are awarded with preference for countries, languages, and fields of study critical to U.S. national security. Preference is also given to students who will study abroad for longer periods of time and who are highly motivated by the opportunity to work in the federal government. As we cannot list all countries, languages, and fields that are critical to U.S. national security, we are interested in applications that fall outside the preferences, if the candidate can make a compelling case that such study can contribute significantly to U.S. national security and the goals of the program.

Eligibility

You are eligible to apply for the Boren Scholarship if you are:

  • A U.S. citizen at the time of application.
  • A high school graduate, or have earned a GED, and are matriculated in an undergraduate degree program in a U.S. post-secondary institution, including universities, colleges, and community colleges accredited by an accrediting body recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.
  • Applying to engage in a study abroad experience in a country outside of Western Europe, Canada, Australia, or New Zealand that meets home institution standards.
  • Planning to use the scholarship for study abroad, and the study abroad program ends before you graduate. Boren Scholarships are not for study in the United States.

Application Process

Although Boren Scholarship candidates do not have to be endorsed by Grinnell College, applicants who go through their college review process have a decided advantage over those who do not go through the review. Additionally, there is no limit to the number of students Grinnell can endorse, and we plan to endorse all qualified, eligible candidates. We therefore highly recommend that you apply for Grinnell’s endorsement in the Boren Scholarship competition and do not apply as an at-large candidate.

To apply for Grinnell’s endorsement for the Boren Scholarship, please submit the following elements to the Center for Careers, Life, and Service, 1127 Park St., by the campus deadline noted above.

  • A completed Boren Scholarship application (submitted online). The application has three sections (click on the following for advice on completing each section): a study abroad program section, a budget section, and two statements of purpose (which they call “essays”). You do not need to print out this application; when you submit the application electronically, it will become accessible to Steve Gump, Grinnell’s Boren Scholarship campus representative. He will also be able to “unsubmit” the application, returning it to you and allowing for further revisions prior to the national deadline.
  • At least two—but no more than three—letters of recommendation (use the letter of recommendation form). These should be submitted either by e-mail to Steve Gump or (preferably) in hard copy to 1127 Park St. If referees wish, they may give the letters to the scholarship applicant in a sealed envelope, signed across the flap. Letters may be addressed to “The Boren Scholarship Selection Committee.”
  • An official transcript, which can be obtained from the Registrar’s Office. Please note that official transcripts often take a few days to obtain. If you have attended other colleges or universities, you must also provide transcripts from these institutions.
  • A one-page study abroad program description with cost information. (This may be a page from the program’s website or a photocopy of part of the program brochure.) Or, if you set up a direct enrollment or individually arranged study abroad program, please provide two letters of support. The first letter should be from your home institution and the second letter should be from your overseas host institution.
  • Language Assessment Form. Boren offers this advice on completing this form.
  • (Optional) A Language Proficiency Form, completed by a foreign language instructor or other qualified evaluator.
  • A completed Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver.

In addition to the many links above to advice on completing the Boren Scholarship application, the foundation also offers these tips on what makes a competitive application.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Past Grinnell College Boren Scholars

  • Johana Lozano ’11, China (PRC), summer
  • Sarah Spencer ’08, China (PRC), summer
  • Alison Mynsberge ’04, Russia, fall
  • Daniel Wislocki ’98, Taiwan, summer
  • Rachel Erlich ’97, Israel, academic year
Gilman Scholarship

Campus deadline: Tuesday, October 7, 2014, at 5:00 p.m.; Tuesday, March 3, 2015, at 5:00 p.m.

National deadline: Tuesday, October 14, 2014; Tuesday, March 10, 2015

For: study abroad funding for U.S. citizen undergraduates

Scholarship URL: http://www.iie.org/Programs/Gilman-Scholarship-Program

The Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program offers grants for U.S. citizen undergraduate students of limited financial means to pursue academic studies abroad. Such international study is intended to better prepare U.S. students to assume significant roles in an increasingly global economy and interdependent world. International experience is critically important in the educational and career development of American students, but it can also require a substantial financial investment. The Gilman Scholarship Program broadens the student population that studies abroad by supporting undergraduates who might not otherwise participate due to financial constraints. The program aims to encourage students to choose non-traditional study abroad destinations, especially those outside of Western Europe and Australia. The Gilman Scholarship Program aims to support students who have been traditionally under-represented in study abroad, including but not limited to, students with high financial need, community college students, students in under-represented fields such as the sciences and engineering, students with diverse ethnic backgrounds, and students with disabilities. The program seeks to assist students from a diverse range of public and private institutions from all 50 states, Washington, DC, and Puerto Rico. Award recipients are chosen by a competitive selection process and must use the award to defray eligible study abroad costs. These costs include program tuition, room and board, books, local transportation, insurance, and international airfare.

Eligibility

The Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program is open to all U.S. citizen undergraduates, in good academic standing, who meet the criteria listed below:

  • The applicant must be receiving a Federal Pell Grant or provide proof that he/she will be receiving a Pell Grant at the time of application or during the term of his/her study abroad.
  • The applicant is applying to or has been accepted into a study abroad program eligible for credit by the student’s accredited institution of higher education in the U.S.
  • The applicant is studying abroad for at least 28 days in one country. Programs going to more than one country are eligible if the student will be studying in one country for at least 28 consecutive days.
  • The applicant is studying abroad in any country except Cuba or a country on the State Department’s current Travel Warning list.
  • The applicant is studying in the fall, spring, or academic year terms including winter intersessions. Summer-only programs are not eligible.

Application Process

Please consult this page at the Gilman Scholarship website: Application Process.

The Gilman Scholarship does not require institutional nomination or endorsement from Grinnell College, though applicants do need to obtain certification from the Off-Campus Study office they will be studying abroad and from the Financial Aid Office that they receive or are eligible to receive a Pell Grant. Although students are not required to work with advisors at Grinnell on their application, they are invited to meet with Steve Gump to review the opportunity offered by the Gilman Scholarship, to discuss a potential application, and to review their application materials.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

 

For Other Postgraduate Experiences

 

Carnegie Junior Fellowship

Campus deadline: Monday, November 17, 2014, at 5:00 p.m.

National deadline: Thursday, January 15, 2015

For: postgraduate research experience in international relations

Scholarship URL: http://carnegieendowment.org/about/?fa=jrFellows

The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace is one of the leading think-tanks in Washington, DC, highly respected throughout the world for its thoughtful, academic responses to international crises. Their Junior Fellowships offer an extraordinary opportunity to work for a year in Washington, DC, as a paid research assistant to some of the world’s best scholars in the realm of international relations. According to the institution’s website, “Junior Fellows provide research assistance to scholars, working on Carnegie Endowment’s projects, which change year to year. Junior Fellows have the opportunity to conduct research for books, participate in meetings with high-level officials, contribute to congressional testimony and organize briefings attended by scholars, activists, journalists and government officials.” A Grinnell alumnus who served as a Junior Fellow, Geoff Swenson ’03, compared his experience to attending a university with forty professors and eight students. Fellows have the chance to work closely with senior scholars, to think deeply about international relations, and to publish their thoughts. Junior Fellows are paid $37,000 in addition to a competitive benefits package. For the 2015–16 program year, Carnegie will fund Junior Fellow positions in the following fields:

  • Democracy
  • Nuclear Policy
  • Energy and Climate
  • Middle East Studies (native or near-native Arabic language skills essential; strong background in Middle East politics or history a huge plus)
  • South Asian Studies (applicants should have an interest in military issues and be comfortable with quantitative data manipulation; a strong background in international relations theory, political theory, or international political economy is essential; strong mathematical background is a plus; foreign language skills not required)
  • China Studies (Asia Program) (Mandarin Chinese reading skills a huge plus)
  • Japan Studies (Asia Program) (Japanese reading skills required)
  • Southeast Asian Studies (Asia Program) (strong background in economics essential; background in politics of the region and knowledge of quantitative techniques a plus)
  • Economics (Asia Program) (Mandarin Chinese reading skills a huge plus)
  • Russian and Eurasian Studies

Eligibility

Members of the Classes of 2014 and 2015 are eligible to apply, as long as they have not yet begun graduate studies. International students may apply as long as they are eligible to work in the USA for a full year following graduation (from August 1 through July 31), which typically means being here on an F-1 visa. The average Junior Fellow has a minimum of a 3.8 GPA and significant coursework in international relations, history, political science, economics, Russian, Arabic, or Chinese. International experience, such as a semester abroad, is preferred, as are candidates who plan a career related to international relations. Independent study, such as a MAP, or assisting a professor with research (especially in a field related to international relations) is also a great help but is not required. Applicants must be nominated by their undergraduate institution (see below).

Selection Criteria

According to the Carnegie website, “Applications are judged on the quality of the written essay, related academic study and/or work experience, grades, recommendations, and personal interviews.” The three-page essay is by a key factor in being invited to an interview (assuming good grades and a demonstrated interest in international relations), and the interview is key to obtaining the Fellowship.

Application & Nomination Process

Grinnell many annually nominate two applicants for this fellowship. To apply for nomination, please submit the following elements to the Center for Careers, Life, and Service, 1127 Park St., by the campus deadline noted above:

  • A completed Carnegie Junior Fellows Application Form.
  • A one-page, double-spaced essay on why you would like to become a Junior Fellow.
  • A one- or two-page resume, including telephone number, address, extracurricular activities, and work experience. Please visit the CLS for assistance with your resume (if you have not done so previously).
  • Two letters of recommendation. One of these should be from someone in your major department.
  • A copy of your transcript, obtained from the Registrar’s Office. This may be an unofficial copy but should not be a copy printed off from PioneerWeb.
  • A completed and signed Grinnell College Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver.
  • An essay of no more than three typewritten, double-spaced pages on a topic provided by the Carnegie Endowment. These topics are intended to test skills in analysis, logic, and written expression. The essays should be thought pieces, not research papers. You should submit an essay related to your primary research program interests, although the Carnegie Endowment may ultimately select an applicant for a program outside of his or her designated primary interest or make an assignment to more than one program. You must respond to the question pertaining to the program to which you are applying. (Please consult with Steve Gump regarding the specific questions for the 2015–16 program year.) 

For the on-campus nomination process, please ensure that all application materials comply with these submission guidelines. Our nominating committee, composed of professors from the Political Science and Economics departments, will interview applicants in early December and announce our two nominees before winter break. Final applications are due to the Carnegie Endowment in mid-January. Candidates must apply through Grinnell College and may not apply independently. Candidates should not contact the Carnegie Endowment directly. Candidates may, though, contact Grinnell alumni Geoff Swenson ’03 or Gretchen Lay ’07 to learn more about their experiences as Carnegie Junior Fellows.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

 

Fulbright Grants

Campus deadline (for endorsement): Monday, September 29, 2014, at 5:00 p.m.

National deadline: Tuesday, October 14, 2014, at 4:00 p.m.

For: year-long international experiences, primarily in research or teaching English

Scholarship URL: http://us.fulbrightonline.org/

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program sponsors two general types of Fulbright grants for U.S. citizens:

  • Fulbright Full Grants, which fund one academic year of overseas study and/or research in one country.
  • English Teaching Assistantships (ETAs), which fund one academic year of teaching English in one country.

Details on both of these types of grants are below. Additionally, Fulbright offers several specialized grants eligible to Grinnell graduates, including Travel-Only Grants (typically awarded only to graduate students), Fulbright-mtvU Awards, Fulbright-National Geographic Digital Storytelling Fellowships, and Critical Language Enhancement Awards. Note that some of these specialized grants have different deadlines and application requirements. Please consult the Fulbright website for details.

Full Grants

Scholarship URL: http://www.us.fulbrightonline.org/about/types-of-grants/study-research

Academic or Full Grants allow students to undertake a year of study, research, and/or professional training at an academic institution in a different country. For graduating seniors, it is strongly recommended that your plan relies heavily on coursework. While this coursework may be supplemented by other experiences (internships, archival research, fieldwork, lab work, independent study, etc.), at least 50 percent of your time should be spent in the classroom, and it is perfectly acceptable to have a project proposal consisting solely of coursework. Indeed, many countries offer one-year taught Master’s programs that may be completed on a Fulbright. Full grant applicants should plan to obtain a letter of affiliation from someone at their host institution who will oversee and guide their fellowship year. Details of the grant duration, preferred topics, preferred candidates, affiliation requirements, grant benefits, language requirements, housing, additional stipends for dependents, and visa requirements are all determined on country-by-country bases. Potential applicants should review the Country Summaries on the Fulbright website to learn more about each individual country.

English Teaching Assistantships

Scholarship URL: http://www.us.fulbrightonline.org/about/types-of-grants/english-teaching-assistant-grants

English Teaching Assistantships (ETAs) are currently available in dozens of countries across all world regions (see link above for a complete list and more details). Depending on the country, ETAs may teach in elementary or secondary schools, universities, or language centers. They are usually placed outside of capital cities and occasionally live with host families. In some countries, ETAs may also pursue individual study and research in addition to their teaching duties. ETA candidates are rated by decision-making committees in six areas:

  • Academic merit/achievement
  • Quality of the written essays
  • Personal qualities
  • Language abilities (if required)
  • Teaching / tutoring / education experience
  • Other factors, such as community engagement, limited experience in host country, etc.)

Eligibility

Below is a brief outline of the eligibility criteria for the Fulbright; all candidates should review the full list of eligibility criteria on the Fulbright website to ensure that they are eligible for the grant for which they are applying. Applicants must:

  • Be U.S. citizens at the time of application. Permanent residents are not eligible.
  • Hold a B.A. degree or the equivalent before the start of the grant.
  • Be in good health.

Benefits

Fulbright benefits are based on the cost of living in the host country (and thus vary by country). In general, though, Fulbright grant benefits (both Full Grants and ETAs) include:

  • Round-trip transportation to the host country;
  • Maintenance for the academic year, based on living costs in the host country; and
  • Limited health benefits.

In addition, Full Grants may include (see relevant Country Summary for details):

  • Book and research allowances. (The allowance provides some funding for research, books, and/or supplies. Grantees with projects that require extensive research support, in-country travel, study materials, or equipment should explore additional funding from other sources to supplement the Fulbright funding.)
  • Mid-term enrichment activities in many countries or world regions.
  • Full or partial tuition.
  • Language study programs.
  • Pre-departure and in-country orientation.

For more details on Fulbright benefits, please see the Fulbright benefits webpage.

Application Process

Candidates for a Fulbright may either apply as enrolled or at-large candidates.

Enrolled Candidates

Grinnell may annually endorse any number of students or alumni for Fulbright awards. Currently enrolled Grinnell students should apply as enrolled candidates; Grinnell alumni may choose to apply as enrolled candidates or at-large candidates. Enrolled candidates must submit the following elements by the campus deadline noted above (note that some pieces are to be submitted in hard copy to the Center for Careers, Life, and Service, 1127 Park St.):

  • A completed Fulbright application, created by the Fulbright online application, including your project proposal and personal statement. This application is submitted electronically via the Fulbright website and does not need to be submitted in person. The project proposal and personal statement do not have to be final drafts but should be solid, nearly done drafts. Your Campus Committee Evaluation will be written based on these drafts, so while you may continue to work on these drafts after this date, you should submit work you are proud of and which reflects your abilities. Your application will be “un-submitted” to you later in the week so that you may continue developing it prior to the national deadline two weeks later.
  • Three letters of recommendation. Letters of recommendation must be submitted via the online system (once a letter is submitted via the online system, it cannot be corrected, edited, or revised). For ETA candidates: please be sure that your letter-writers know that their “letter” is actually a series of short-answer questions, not a typical letter of recommendation. They will be able to access these questions through a link that will be sent to them once you register them in your online application.
  • A Grinnell College Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver. This form should be printed out, completed, and submitted in paper copy to Steve Gump at 1127 Park St.
  • 3–5-page paper that describes what research you have done on the country you propose to live in during your Fulbright year and what you have found interesting about its history, culture, relationship with the United States, and educational system. Full grant applicants should also include information about the institution that they wish to attend during their Fulbright year. This document will help to inform your Campus Committee Evaluation. The most helpful and successful papers are those that show that the author has done research about the country to be visited and the systems in which they will be researching or teaching; research about current events and educational policy are generally more relevant than research about food, for example. It is particularly helpful when students show how their personal experiences would prepare them for or give them insight into these challenges.

An example of a good Fulbright Full Grant 3–5-page paper is available, as is an example of a good Fulbright ETA Grant 3–5-page paper.

Additionally, the following materials may be required of enrolled candidates for the on-campus nomination process, depending on their country of study and area of study:

  • Supplementary materials for candidates in the arts, as needed (instructions from Fulbright here). These should be submitted in hard copy to Steve Gump at 1127 Park St.
  • foreign language background report, completed online, as needed.
  • foreign language assessment, completed online, as needed. Please note: due to a quirk in the Fulbright online system, if someone is submitting both a letter of recommendation and a Foreign Language Assessment on your behalf, they will have to use separate e-mail addresses for each document (e.g., an @grinnell.edu e-mail address for the letter of recommendation, and an @gmail.com e-mail address for the Foreign Language Assessment).
  • letter of affiliation. Candidates for Full Grants are well advised to obtain a letter of affiliation from someone at their host institution stating the nature of the relationship and that they will welcome the Fulbright applicant if offered a grant. This letter should be hand-signed on letterhead and uploaded to the Fulbright online application.

All Fulbright candidates will be required to meet individually with Steve Gump at least once between September 30 and October 7 to review their Fulbright essays.

To submit all of the other items in your online application, press “submit” on your online Fulbright application before the on-campus deadline. Please know that once you have taken this step, the application is not yet released to Fulbright, just to Steve Gump, Grinnell’s Fulbright Program Advisor (FPA). If you have already submitted the application online and need to revise it, please contact Steve Gump, who can “unsubmit” your application for you at any time after the on-campus deadline, allowing you to continue working on it until the national deadline in mid-October.

At-Large Candidates

Grinnell College alumni are welcome and encouraged to apply through our enrolled candidate process; national statistics show that enrolled candidates win Fulbright awards at about twice the frequency as at-large candidates. If they so choose, however, alumni may instead apply as at-large candidates. In this case, they would skip all of the above steps and apply directly to Fulbright by the mid-October deadline; no on-campus endorsement is required. Steve Gump will work with and advise alumni candidates just as if they were enrolled candidates (though remotely, as necessary).

Resources for Applicants

Fulbright applicants from Grinnell College may find the following materials to be helpful:

Advice from Fulbright on the application elements is arranged by the type of grant for which you are applying. Please select the type of grant for which you plan to apply and review the tips for that category of grant:

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Watson Fellowship

Campus deadline: Monday, September 15, 2014, at 5:00 p.m.

National deadline: Wednesday, November 5, 2014

For: a year of international exploration after graduating for Grinnellians of unusual promise

Scholarship URL: http://www.watsonfellowship.org/site/index.html

The Thomas J. Watson Foundation inaugurated the Thomas J. Watson Fellowship in 1968. The mission of the Fellowship Program is to offer college graduates of unusual promise a year of independent, purposeful exploration and travel outside of the United States in order to enhance their capacity for resourcefulness, imagination, openness, and leadership and to foster their humane and effective participation in the world community.

The Program provides Fellows an opportunity for a focused and disciplined year of their own devising—a period in which they can have some surcease from the lockstep of prescribed educational and career patterns in order to explore with thoroughness a particular interest. During their year abroad, Fellows have an unusual, sustained, and demanding opportunity to take stock of themselves, to test their aspirations and abilities, to view their lives and American society in greater perspective, and, concomitantly, to develop a more informed sense of international concern.

In selecting Watson Fellows, members of the Watson Foundation are most concerned with holistically identifying individuals who demonstrate leadership, resourcefulness, imagination or vision, independence, integrity, responsibility and emotional maturity, and courage. A candidate’s academic record, while not of primary importance, is also considered, together with those extracurricular activities that reflect both initiative and dedication.

The proposed project should reflect a candidate’s genuine interest in, and long-standing commitment to, a specific pursuit, whether or not this interest is evident in a formal course of study. The project must be one that can be conducted with great independence and adaptability, and it cannot involve formal study at a foreign institution. It must involve travel to areas where the student has not previously lived or studied for a significant length of time. Fellows are not allowed to return home at any time during their Fellowship year except in rare circumstances and with the prior approval of the program. In short, the project should be personally significant, imaginative, and feasible.

Administered in cooperation with outstanding private colleges and universities throughout the United States, the Watson Fellowship provides a grant of $28,000 to each recipient. (Fellows whose spouse or dependent child will accompany them may be eligible for a grant of $35,000.) In addition, the Fellowship Program will supply, as a supplement to the stipend, an amount equal to twelve months of payments of eligible outstanding federally guaranteed and institutional student loans. The purpose of the student loan assistance program is to ease the financial burden of Watson Fellows during their Fellowship year, and to provide encouragement for all students, regardless of student loan debt, to apply for Watson Fellowships.

All Fellows are required to maintain contact with the Fellowship Program during their year abroad. In addition to quarterly progress reports, they must submit a final evaluation of their year together with an accounting of the expenditure of Fellowship funds. The Fellowship is taxable and must be reported by recipients as income. Taxes are not withheld by the Fellowship Program.

The Thomas J. Watson Fellowship Program welcomes applicants from a diverse range of backgrounds and academic disciplines. All graduating seniors at participating institutions are eligible for nomination by their institution. In 2015, forty Watson Fellows will be selected from among the approximately 155 candidates nominated by the participating institutions.

Grinnell College and the Watson Fellowship

Grinnell College is proud to be able to nominate four seniors for the 2014–15 Thomas J. Watson Fellowship competition. Grinnell College has been invited to participate in this Fellowship every year since the program was founded in the late 1960s, and, with only three exceptions, has had at least one Watson Fellow in each class. (See the bottom of this entry for a complete list of Grinnell’s Watson Fellows, including their projects and destinations.) Steve Gump serves as Grinnell College’s liaison to the Watson Foundation; he is always happy to meet and talk with potential applicants about their ideas and plans for a Watson Fellowship.

Application Process

To be considered for a Grinnell College nomination for the Watson Fellowship, please submit the following materials to the Center for Careers, Life, and Service, 1127 Park St., by the campus deadline noted above:

  • Grinnell College’s 2014–15 Watson Fellowship Application Form (with apologies for some funky formatting on the second page). This form is a .pdf file and requires Adobe Acrobat to open. The application is formatted with form fields, allowing you to complete it on your computer, print it, and submit it. However, please note that unless you are working with a full version of Adobe Acrobat, you will not be able to save your edits and changes. Note also that this application requires a 100-word biographical abstract; before writing this blurb, please review these Watson 100-word biography samples or the biographical abstracts of last year’s Watson Fellows.
  • A personal statement, adhering to these guidelines from the Watson Foundation: “In your personal statement, you should discuss how your project is your project—and how it reflects your talents, concerns, and commitments. It may include a description of your background, your college years, your professional goals and aspirations, and your reasons for seeking a Watson Fellowship to undertake your project. The personal statement is an opportunity to provide the Watson Fellowship Program with a sense of who you are, including how you would benefit from the unique experiences the Watson Fellowship permits and how you would embrace the challenges of immersing yourself in cultures other than your own for a year. The specific content of the personal statement is up to you, but we require that it not exceed 1,500 words.” See also this advice on writing personal statements.
  • A project proposal, adhering to these guidelines from the Watson Foundation: “The proposal should describe your plan for the 12-month fellowship year, including a description of your proposed project and details as to how you intend to carry it out. In addition, you should include information about what it is that prepares you to undertake your project. The specific content of the proposal is up to you, but we require that it not exceed 1,500 words.” Please note that Watson Fellows are not allowed to travel to countries under State Department Travel Warnings; please check this list to ensure that the countries you plan to visit are not currently under travel warning. Contact Steve Gump if you have any questions about this policy.
  • (Optional) Other documents considered necessary for explaining the feasibility of the proposal, including such items as a budget, list of contacts, or itinerary. Applicants who proposal includes an artistic talent or skill (such as photography, dance, or musical performance) may submit materials that demonstrate their abilities; before doing so, please contact Steve Gump to work out the particulars of what and how materials should be submitted.
  • An unofficial copy of your transcript, obtained from the Registrar’s Office. Do not print out your transcript from PioneerWeb and submit this instead of the unofficial transcript.

The application form, personal statement, and project proposal should each be stapled separately, then paper-clipped together with the transcript to form a complete packet. In addition, you must also:

  • Arrange to have two recommendations submitted by the campus deadline, one of which must be from a Grinnell College faculty member. These recommendations should use the three-page Watson Fellowship Recommendation Form and should NOT write a separate letter. That form is an Adobe .pdf file, and the form fields should be fillable. Recommendations should be completed, printed, and submitted directly to the CLS by mail, campus mail, or fax to (641) 269-4946; recommenders who have a full version of Adobe may be able to save it and email it to gumpstev[at]grinnell[dot]edu. Recommenders may contact Steve Gump if they have any questions about submitting their recommendation.
  • Print, sign, and submit a copy (separate from your packets) of the Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver.

All candidates will be interviewed individually by two committee members, after which time a short list of finalists for our four nominations will be named. Those finalists will interview with one additional committee member before final decisions are made about Grinnell’s four nominees. Nomination decisions will most likely be announced before fall break.

2014–15 Grinnell College Nomination Committee Members

  • Katya Gibel Mevorach, Anthropology
  • Kelly Herold, Russian
  • Joe Mileti, Mathematics & Statistics
  • Tony Perman, Music
  • Caleb Stroup, Economics
  • Andi Tracy, Psychology

Committee members may write recommendations for candidates, provided that the committee members are a natural and strong fit for the students and their project. Committee members should not be asked to write recommendations simply because they are on the committee. Letters from committee members will not be weighed more heavily than letters from non-committee members.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Grinnell College Watson Fellows, 1969–Present

  • Jonathan D. Buswell, ’69; Agricultural Economic Development; Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua
  • John Garang DeMabior, ’69; Rural Development; East Africa
  • Gregory M. Coggs, ’70; Comparative Law; Kenya, Ghana, Nigeria
  • Benson F. Smith, ’70; Film; England
  • Mary E. Brooner, ’71; The Status of Women: a Third-World Perspective; Ghana, Ceylon
  • Thomas J. Cole, ’71; The Subculture of Poverty and the Impact of Welfare Systems; Great Britain
  • David N. Feldman, ’71; The Aesthetics of “Lower” Forms of Popular Culture; England, France, Denmark, Sweden
  • Douglas S. Russell, ’71; New Town Planning and Population Decentralization; Finland, West Germany, England, Sweden, Denmark
  • Edward M. Hirsch, ’72; The Relationship of Violence to Poetic Form; Wales, France, England
  • Norris Stubbs, ’72; A Dual Project: Comparative Afro-Caribbean Music and Problems of Engineering in the Caribbean; Brazil, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad, Tobago, Barbados, Honduras, Guyana
  • Robert E. Eckhardt, ’73; European Approaches to the Problems of the Aged; Spain, Sweden, Poland
  • David L. Gaines, ’74; Mime; Western Europe, Poland, Japan
  • Gregg H.S. Golden, ’75; First Amendment Rights: Their Parallels in Other Countries; England, France, Norway
  • Charles M. Becker, ’76; State Credit Allocations; Yugoslavia, Tanzania, New Zealand
  • Susan B. Hyatt, ’76; Multi-Ethnic Traditions in the Balkans; Yugoslavia, Greece, Bulgaria
  • Patrick Irwin, ’77; American Jazz and Jazz Musicians; UK, Denmark, France, Germany, Switzerland, Austria
  • Ann K. Lion, ’78; Comparative Study of Family Planning; Barbados, Jamaica
  • June Bradley, ’78; New Generation of European Art Photographers; France, England, Italy, West Germany
  • Jo Looye, ’79; Handicrafts and Economic Development; Chile, Ecuador
  • Keith Graves, ’79; Acoustical Analysis of Baroque Music in Halls of Baroque Period; Italy, Austria, West Germany, France, England
  • Kathleen Kurz, ’80; Child Nutrition; Kenya, Tanzania
  • Angelo Ioffreda, ’80; Old/New World Aspects of Viticulture; Italy, France, Chile, Argentina
  • Donna Olds, ’81; Jamaican Cultural History; Liberia, Jamaica
  • James Jensen, ’81; Bio-Gas Digestion Systems; England, India, China
  • Laure Capouya, ’82; Landscape Artists in the New World; Mexico, Brazil
  • Kathryn Jackson, ’83; Nation Building in Africa; Kenya, Zimbabwe, South Africa
  • Todd L. Oberman, ’83; Grass-Roots Citizen’s Groups; Yugoslavia
  • Cynthia Chessick, ’84; Women in Israel; Israel
  • Elizabeth Keegan, ’85; Writers and Literature; China
  • Amy Fraenkel, ’85; Acid Rain in Europe; Sweden, France, England
  • Meghan Hays, ’87; Cuba, Yugoslavian, and Nicaraguan Women: The Family and the Socialist State; Cuba, Yugoslavia, Nicaragua
  • Sarah Fee, ’87; The Funerary Art of France and Madagascar; France, Madagascar
  • Peter McBride, ’87; Latin American: Retracing the Nature Studies of Darwin and Wallace; Latin American countries
  • Lorelei Kelley, ’88; Women’s Involvement in Arms Control Disarmament; Sweden, W. Germnay, England, New Zealand
  • Timothy Manatt, ’88; The Conciencia Group; Argentina
  • Emily Green, ’89; Cutural and Social Perceptions of Children; Guatemala, El Salvador
  • Michelle Kuenzi, ’89; Development, Modernization, and Women’s Subsistence Strategies; Senegal, Mali
  • Lauri Jennisch, ’90; Geriatric Health and Social Services; Sweden, England, Canada
  • Jon Kosek, ’90; Resource Use and Protection; Costa Rica, Kenya, Nepal
  • Steven Pickle, ’90; Political Organizations of Indigenous Peoples; Norway, Australia, New Zealand
  • Bruce Emond, ’91; AIDS Counseling and Information Services; Thailand, Malaysia
  • Seth Peterson, ’91; Chinese Democracy Movement-in-Exile; France, Germany, Australia, Japan, Canada
  • Louis Saletan, ’91; Effects of Reforms on Soviet Performance Arts; USSR
  • Shaan Hamilton, ’92; Waste Management and the Environment; England, Latvia
  • Adrienne McAdory, ’92; Race vs. Ethnic vs. Class Consciousness: A Study in Africa; Ghana, Kenya, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Sierra Leone
  • Adam Stam, ’93; Agrarian Reform in Russia; Russia, Ukraine
  • Rachel Stamm, ’94; The Relationship between Ecotourism and Marine Mammal Conservation; Norway, Canada, Dominican Republic, Bahamas
  • Todd Foreman, ’95; Minority Groups in British Commonwealth Labour Parties; New Zealand, Australia, United Kingdom
  • Veronica Ocampo-Raeder, ’95; The Dance of Humans and Nature: Finding Signatures in Tropical Rainforests; Belize, Tahiti, Kenya, Brazil
  • Aaron Gross, ’96; The Practice of Ahimsa in Jainism and Tibetan Buddhism; India
  • Ryan Gibson, ’98; Creating a Modern Irish Mythology by Translating Words into Forms; The Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland
  • Margaret L. Taylor, ’99; Space, Place, and Identity in the European Circus; England, France, Denmark, Switzerland
  • David Burnett, ’00; Technopreneurs: Making Asian Tigers Roar Again?; Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia, India
  • Megan Williams, ’00; The Dustbin of History: Monuments in Eastern Europe, 1945–2000; Germany, Poland, the Baltics, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Romania, Moldova, Bulgaria, Macedonia
  • Matthew Magee, ’01; Hepatitis C in Rural and Urban Populations; Italy, Egypt, India
  • Michael Abel, ’02; Williamsport Bound: Youth Baseball in Asia and Latin America; Japan, Taiwan, Mexico, Venezuela, Curacao
  • Hai-Dang Phan, ’03; Trans-planted and -lated Selves: Poetry in Exile; England, France, Australia
  • Devan McGranahan, ’04; Sustainable Grazing and the Management of Native Mammals on African Ranches; Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania, Kenya
  • Qi Zheng, ’04; Magic Bullet or Water Gun: Perception and Use of Antibiotics; Ireland, the Netherlands, Singapore, Thailand
  • Omondi Kasidhi ’05; Bringing Home More than a Medal: The Socioeconomic Impact of African Runners; South Africa, Botswana, Ethiopia, Morocco, Nigeria, and Ghana
  • Kyle Marquardt ’05; The People’s Fate: Language and Politics in Three Turkic States; Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan
  • Jason Rathod ’06; Finding Self in the Other: Cultural Fusion in the Indian Diaspora; Fiji, Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago, Mauritius
  • Sarah Parker ’07 ; Innovative Traditional Music: Marimba and Youth Culture in Southern Africa; Botswana, Namibia, South Africa
  • Linn Davis ’08 ; Investigating the Investigators: Journalism in Two Developing Democracies; India and South Africa
  • Graciela Paz Arias ’08; Into the Young Mind of a Cultural Revolutionary: Retracing Che’s Travels; Argentina, Chile, Peru, and Venezuela
  • Filippos Rodger Tsakiris ’10; No Island Is an Island: An Alternative Approach to Global Sustainability; Bahamas, United Kingdom, Iceland, Sweden, Maldives, New Zealand
  • Alex Reich ’11; We Are What We Eat: The Far North and Its People in a Changing World; Canada, Russia, Norway, Sweden, Finland
  • Courtney Sheehan ’11; The Politics of Film Festivals; Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Netherlands, India, Russia
  • Ngoc Truong ’11; Creative Discontent: Speechwriting in Open and Closed Societies; India, South Africa, Singapore, Vietnam, Australia
  • Wadzanai Motsi ’12; Speaking Up: Unearthing the Motivation for Political Activism Amongst Students; Tunisia, Ghana, Czech Republic, Cambodia
  • Noah Most ’13; Do-It-Yourself Biology: Innovation, Social Implications, and the Inversion of Research Paradigms; United Kingdom, Canada, India, Singapore
  • Theodore Hoffman Jr. ’14; Marginalized Imaginations: Embracing Global Adaptive Theaters; South Africa, New Zealand, India, Ghana