Services

For Students

Circulation

General Circulation Policies

Library materials that circulate outside the building must be checked out using your Pioneer One Card (or, for local residents, Drake Community Library card). You must present your card to library staff to check out library materials, including reserve readings. You are responsible for all materials checked out on your card, so it’s not a good idea to check things out for other people, or to lend what you have borrowed to others. The library will notify you by e-mail when books have been recalled, when interlibrary loan materials are ready for pickup, when items you have are overdue, and for other library-related matters. Be sure to check your e-mail every day.  You may view your record online from any computer with internet access; this will display all library items checked out, with their due dates.  You may renew most items online.  Grinnell College users log in with their network user name and password, and community members with their name and Grinnell College Libraries barcode.

Do not take material out of the library without checking it out. Not only does this inconvenience other students and faculty by depriving them of its use, but also it is an act of theft under the Code of Iowa, chapters 714.5 and 808.12. Taking non-checked-out material through the library security gate constitutes theft and the College reserves the right to prosecute offenders under the terms of this law, as well as to deal with violations through the college judicial system.

Access, use, and reproduction of the electronic journals, databases, and other resources made available through the Grinnell College Libraries are governed by contracts or license agreements between the College and publishers or third parties. In many cases, license agreements impose greater restrictions on use than does copyright law, and these terms may limit uses of non-copyrighted material. Members of the Grinnell College community are expected to make reasonable and good faith efforts to comply with the terms of these agreements. For further information, please see License Agreements and Academic Computer Use Policies.

Circulation Policies for Students

Be sure to have your Pioneer One-Card with you to check out all materials. All checked-out materials are subject to immediate recall if needed for Course Reserves.  See below for Bills, Fines and Blocks.

Books

Books are due at the end of the semester unless recalled by another patron. If recalled, books are due three weeks after the date of check out or three days after the date of recall, whichever is later. If a book is recalled you will receive an email notice with a new due date.  You may check out up to 75 items at one time.

Recalling an Item

To recall an item that is currently checked out, click on the "Request" button toward the top of the screen of the online item record (login required). The item will be recalled, and you will be contacted (through email) when it arrives - this could be up to three weeks (see above). 

Periodicals (magazines and journals)

Periodicals located on the fourth floor circulate for two weeks. They may be recalled three days after the checkout date. Recent issues of magazines and journals located in the current periodicals area on the 1st floor do not circulate. Locations for journals will be indicated in the online catalog record. Please check with a research librarian, a circulation desk supervisor, or student assistant for help in tracking down the volume or issue that you are looking for. Science journals are located in the Kistle Science Library. Some journal volumes are kept in our Off-Site Storage Facility. You may request them through the online catalog and they will be brought to campus for your use within 24 hours, Monday-Friday. The library also subscribes to many full-text electronic journals.

Course Reserves

Normally, course reserves circulate for two hours, four hours (recordings), one day, or three days. The loan period for reserve items is determined by the professor who puts the item on reserve. The due date and time of your reserve item is printed on your receipt. Return reserve items promptly because overdue fines can add up quickly for these items.

Permanent Reserve

These books, kept behind the circulation desk, normally circulate for two hours. Permanent reserve items include foreign language dictionaries, travel books, style guides and other reference books that are in high-demand.

Videos and CD's

Most videos and CD's circulate to students for one week. There are some items in the collection that are noncirculating. The catalog should give you this information. 

This collection is noncirculating. If you need material for a class presentation or another special purpose, please check with a research librarian to find out if it is possible to arrange an exception to this policy.

Special Collections

Special Collections, located in the Iowa Room, includes the Iowa Room (a collection of faculty, staff, and alumni publications), Rare Books (also called Vault books), and the Archives collections. These are noncirculating collections. Please visit the Iowa Room and speak with the archivist and special collections librarian for assistance in using this collection.

Maps and Atlases/Microfilm/Newspapers

These are noncirculating collections. If you need material for a class presentation or another special purpose, please check with a  research librarian to find out if it is possible to arrange an exception to this policy.

Curriculum Library

Materials in the Curriculum Library, located in Steiner Hall, are intended primarily for the use of education students. Education students may check items out for the semester. Students not in the education program may check books out for one week. Please check with a research librarian, a circulation desk supervisor, or a member of the Education Department for assistance in using this collection.  

Bills, Fines, and Blocks

Books checked out from the library are generally due at the end of the current semester. All books checked out will be subject to recall; that is, the loan period of the item will be shortened and the book will be due and subject to late fees based on an earlier date.  Keeping materials past the due date is inconsiderate and inconveniences other people. The table below shows the fines you will accumulate if you don’t return materials on time. Please remember the collection belongs to the college community and needs to be accessible to everyone.

Two hour reserve materials  $1.00/1st hour overdue; $0.25/hour after 1st hour overdue
One & three day reserve materials  $2.00/day overdue
Interlibrary Loan materials  $1.00/day overdue; $5.00/day for overdue recalled books
Videos (DVDs, VHS)  $2.00/day overdue
CDs $2.00/day overdue
Recalled materials $1.00/day overdue

Should library materials become lost, please let us know as soon as you discover that an item is missing. You keep looking for it and we will too. If it doesn’t show up by the end of the semester, you will need to pay a replacement cost plus $25 to help defray the costs of processing and billing. The sooner we know the material is missing the better the chance of finding it and avoiding the replacement cost. Unreturned materials will incur replacement, processing and billing costs. If the materials billed are returned in good condition within one semester, the charges will be reduced to $5 per item. If the materials are returned after the charge has been deducted, a portion of the charge may be refunded after negotiation with the Manager of Access Services. Students may have their circulation privileges blocked if materials are not returned promptly after overdue notices have been sent. They will remain blocked until all overdue items are returned to the library. If necessary, a student who refuses to comply with library policy may incur additional sanctions, including but not limited to restrictions on the use of library services and/or referral for judicial action. If there is an unusual circumstance, talk with the library staff. Contact the Circulation Desk Supervisor at ext. 3350 and explain what’s going on. But do it before the fines start accumulating!

eReaders

The Grinnell College Libraries is now checking out a limited number of Amazon Kindles and Barnes & Noble Nooks.

  • eReaders may be checked out by any student, faculty, or staff with an active account.  (They are not available to local area residents, special students, or faculty/staff partners.)
  • Loan period is one semester or break (winter/summer).
  • They are not renewable; there are no consecutive checkouts.
  • There will not be a waiting list, and they are not holdable or recallable ("first-come, first-serve").
  • The overdue fines will be $2.00/day (the same as videos).
  • Patrons will be billed for full replacement cost at 7 days overdue.  Patron is responsible for full replacement cost if lost or damaged; if returned late, the charge will be reduced.
  • eReaders must be returned in person to Burling Circulation desk – they should NOT be placed in a book drop.
  • The patron must use their own Barnes & Noble or Amazon account to view and download content.
  • Before check-in, the patron must de-register their account from the device.
  • Any content saved will be deleted upon return of device; patron is responsible to discontinue any ongoing charges (such as a newspaper subscription).
  • For use instructions and troubleshooting, refer to www.amazon.com/kindledocuments orwww.barnesandnoble.com/nook/support.
  • eReaders are fragile.  Please handle carefully!  
Request a Missing Book

You can request a missing book here.

Media Circulation

Burling Media Room and AV Center Circulation Policies

Basic Burling Media Room borrowing policies are included in the general borrowing policy pages for faculty,students, staff, visitors, and Grinnell residents.  Students may also consult pages 69-70 of the Grinnell College Student Handbook.

Loan Rules

All recordings may be used in the Burling Media Room or throughout Burling Library. You will find some videos housed on reserve in the AV Center. The online catalog will direct you to the appropriate location, or please stop by or call Randye Jones (3365), Burling Media Room supervisor, or Ralph Helt (3073), AV Center supervisor, for assistance in locating the audio or visual material you need. The following rules apply to items being checked out from either location:  

Faculty and Staff (excluding Music Faculty)

  • Audio Recordings-CDs and audio cassettes: circulate for four weeks.

  • Audio Recordings-Other ( LPs, reel-to-reel tapes) may not be checked out

  • Video Recordings may be checked out for classroom or private home use. Library-Use Only videos/DVDs may be checked out for a class or in preparation for a class. The Burling Media Room supervisor, a Circulation supervisor, or a Reference Librarian, or the AV Center staff may need to authorize check out. Videos and DVDs circulate for four weeks.  

 All faculty and staff must have their P-Card and may borrow up to the limits established for total numbers of libraries materials.  If the recordings are for classroom use, the Listening Room supervisor may make an exception to this rule.

Music Faculty

The loan rules are the same as above with the following exceptions:

Recordings-Other (see above for description) may be checked out without prior approval, but they must be checked out by the Listening Room supervisor, a Circulation supervisor, or a Reference Librarian. They are checked out for four weeks. All recordings should be procured in the Burling Media Room.

Students 

  • Recordings-CDs and audio cassettes may be checked out for one week. They are due back to the Burling Circulation Desk, Burling Media Room or AV Center by the location’s closing time. If a student is an authorized student assistant, s/he may check out recordings for the designated faculty member. Authorized students must have their own ID and the faculty member's ID or ID number to complete the transaction.

  • Recordings-Other (see above for description) may not be checked out (except for faculty by authorized student assistants).

  • Videos may be checked out for one week. They are due back to the Burling Circulation Desk, Burling Media Room or AV Center by the location’s closing time on the due date. If a student is an authorized student assistant, s/he may check out recordings for the designated faculty member. Authorized students must have their own ID and the faculty member's ID or ID number to complete the transaction. 

Students may have up to six recordings checked out at a time.  Recordings may be renewed once online, via telephone or in person if there are no restrictions on the item(s) or on the patron’s borrowing privileges.

Grinnell Residents and Visitors 

Local area residents may not check out Burling Media Room or AV Center recordings.  

Equipment

Four portable CD players are available for four-hour check out from the Burling Media Room. Headphones are also available but are restricted to use in the Burling Media Room.  Headsets for use outside the Listening Room are available at the Burling Circulation Desk.  For information about equipment in the AV Center, please call Ralph Helt, 3121, or go to the AV Center web site.

Borrowing Instructions

A valid Grinnell College ID is required to check out materials from the Burling Media Room.

Borrowers are responsible for the full replacement cost of lost or damaged material, plus a $20 processing fee and a $10 service charge.

Borrowers may not charge admission when using videos or DVDs, nor may these materials be used for fundraising or other commercial purposes. 

All videos and DVDs in the collection are loaned to individual users for their private use or for educational use. They may not be used or shown as part of any public program without the approval of the copyright owner. The libraries may be able to assist you in seeking permission for this. 

A limited number of  videos were obtained with public performing rights--which allows for campus sponsored showings as long as no admission is charged.  The titles may be found by keyword searching the library catalog for "public performance rights."  Please see Randye Jones, Burling Media Room supervisor, to discuss public performances rights and limitations.

Faculty may grant staff and/or student assistants the authority to check out Burling Media Room or AV Center items.  However, they must arrange this in advance by completing the permission form and submitting it to the Burling Library Circulation Department.  For the protection of patrons, there are no exceptions made to this policy.  

Overdues & Bills - Students

The fine for overdue recordings is $2.00 per item per day. Overdue notices are sent via e-mail. After three overdue notices, a bill is sent. The bill covers the replacement cost of the item, plus a $20 processing fee and a $10 service charge. If the item is returned, the bill is reduced to the accumulated fines but does not exceed $20.

Burling Media Room staff are not notified when these notices are sent; they are sent automatically by the system. If there is a problem or you wish to dispute a charge, contact the Burling Media Room Supervisor directly as soon as possible.

Overdues & Bills - Faculty/Staff

Faculty are not charged fines for overdue materials.

However, after 24 months, if the item has not been returned or renewed, you will be charged a replacement cost for each item. 

Holds

If a Burling Media Room recording is checked out or otherwise not available for loan (i.e., the recording is "In Process"), patrons may place a hold on the recording.  With this hold, the patron would be immediately notified when the recording has been returned, and the recording would be held for them in the Burling Media Room for 24 hours.  If the item is "In Process" or "On Order," it would be rush cataloged and processed for the patron's use, and the patron would be notified when the recording is ready.

Recalls

In cases where faculty, staff or students have a class-related need for a recording that has been checked out, they may contact the Burling Media Room supervisor and request that the recording be recalled.  The supervisor may then contact the patron who has the recording checked out to arrange its early return.  Where possible, the recording may be returned within 24 hours; however, circumstances may require a much longer timeframe.  Patrons who have class-related need for a recording are encouraged to make arrangements as far in advance as feasible.

Media Recording

Media Recording Policy

Recording

The Burling Media Room has recording capability primarily from analog formats (LP, audio cassette, reel-to-reel audio tape) to digital (CD), with limited facility to record from VHS to DVD.  However, most recording is done only for class-related use and in strict adherence to copyright and fair use guidelines.

The recording of an entire work from a commercially produced recording is not usually permitted. If you need a tape or CD made for a class presentation, please speak to the Burling Media Room supervisor to get a copy of the Recording Request Form. Any questions concerning this policy should be directed to the Burling Media Room Supervisor or the Collection Development Librarian.

 On-Campus Concert Recordings and Taping

Recitals and concerts given by Grinnell College faculty, staff and students are recorded by the Music Department and the archival copy is housed in the Burling Media Room. Some of these recordings are included in our online catalog; please ask if you do not find the recording you are looking for. Generally, these recordings may be copied for the cost of the CD, DVD or tape, currently $1.00 - $2.00, depending on the length of the recording. Please speak to a Burling Media Room staff member if you are interested.

AV Center Recordings

Additional on-campus recordings may be available at the AV Center. Please contact the AV Center staff for more information.  

Other Services for Students

For Faculty and Staff

Authorized Students and Staff

General Guidelines

Academic Support and student assistants perform a variety of Libraries-related tasks for faculty members. We offer two levels of authorization for these activities:

1. Authorized assistants

Authorized assistants may do the following:

  • Check out materials using the faculty barcode number
  • Place materials on reserve
  • Use the Libraries' departmental copy codes

Upon receipt of this signed form, we will add a note to the patron record of an authorized borrower stating that he or she has library privileges for you; we will verify it each time the authorized borrower does library tasks for you. **Please note: We will not give your Pioneer One-Card number to anyone - you will need to provide this number to your authorized borrower. We suggest that you write your number down on a separate sheet of paper and that you not give your Pioneer One-Card to your authorized borrower. Please do not ask your authorized borrower(s) to check library materials out for you using their own Pioneer One-Cards. At the end of each semester, each library patron is considered to be responsible for all library materials listed on his or her patron record. Fines will not be waived for overdue library materials that were checked out for other patrons.

2. NEW! Proxy Electronic Access

Faculty can authorize creation of a proxy electronic account and password, which you can share with your assistants. Your assistants can log into your library account with this username and password. This will allow access only to your library account, not your email, Pioneer Web account, or any other college accounts. Activities that can be completed include:

  • Requesting ILL items in the name of the faculty member *
  • Renewing books online for the faculty member
  • Viewing the items the faculty member has checked out

How to Authorize an Academic Support or Student Assistant

Print out this web page, fill in the blanks below, sign and bring to the Burling Circulation desk. For questions, please contact Micki Behounek (x3354 or [behounek]). 

Faculty name: ___________________________    

Department _____________________________   

_______________________________________ (Name of authorized academic assistant or student) is authorized by me to do any of the library activities listed in point # 1 above  for fall/spring/summer (circle one) _________(year).   (Note: Student Assistants need to be re-authorized each term; ASAs will remain authorized until further notice.)

___Yes   ___No      Please set up proxy electronic access to my library account. After receiving the username and password, I will share this with my assistants as needed. I understand that this will enable them to view my library account, including my checked out items.

* To allow ASAs to pick up interlibrary loan requests you must also authorize the ASA on your User Information page in the ILL program.

 

Signed ___________________________ Date ______________________

Teaching Research at the Libraries

Research Literacy: Support for Faculty

At Grinnell College Libraries, we believe the term research literacy best defines our work of helping students learn the skills and concepts underlying successful academic inquiry.  To this end, we draw from a multifaceted base in our research literacy work:

From the Grinnell College Mission Statement

"The College aims to graduate women and men who can think clearly, who can speak and write persuasively and even eloquently, who can evaluate critically both their own and others' ideas, who can acquire new knowledge, and who are prepared in life and work to use their knowledge and their abilities to serve the common good."

From Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education

The research literate student...

  1. Determines the nature and extent of the information needed.
  2. Accesses needed information effectively and efficiently.
  3. Evaluates information and its sources critically and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge base and value system.
  4. Uses information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose.
  5. Understands many of the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information and accesses and uses information ethically and legally.

And our own Statement on Research Literacy:

Research literacy is a set of interdisciplinary, transferable competencies that help individuals determine and diminish knowledge gaps. To be research literate is to know methods of inquiry, to possess effective research skills, to navigate all formats of publication fluently, to recognize one's personal limitations and how to overcome them, to know where to start, to discern when to consult a librarian or other expert for assistance, and to communicate ideas effectively. It includes the ability to articulate a research information need, to construct complex search statements, to assess the relevance and authority of found documents, and to be capable of synthesizing existing content in order to explore the parameters of her or his research question. Research literacy is the sum of the attributes required of lifelong learners.

The Librarians of Grinnell College seek to develop research literacy skills in concert with discipline-based learning. Librarians offer to consult and collaborate with classroom faculty in order to integrate research literacy competencies into courses and sequence research literacy skills throughout students' academic careers. Through this partnership, students will cultivate research literacy skills, use core resources, and search for information with increased facility, thus improving performance in academic work and beyond.

Tips for planning productive library sessions

Students learn research skills best when a library session is tied to a course assignment. As you develop assignments, please remember that your consulting librarian is available to help your students learn skills and strategies to improve their academic research. 

Preparing an assignment

  • Let students know the purpose of the assignment.  Why are you asking them to do this?  What will they learn from completing it?
  • Be specific.  Let students know what you expect to see:  how long the paper should be, what sources are acceptable to use, what style you want them to follow (APA, MLA, etc.).  Examples or models  are very useful for students. 
  • Test the assignment beforehand.  Be sure the resources you want them to use are available.  Remember that many first-year students are not familiar with how to use an academic library. 
  • Provide examples of scholarly journals.  Many students are not familiar with the differences between scholarly research published in peer-reviewed journals, and articles from magazines aimed at a general audience. 
  • Provide students with citations rather than photocopies.  If the article you want students to read is available in our collection (print or online) give them the citation and let them experience finding the article for themselves.
  • Practice the art of scaffolding:  breaking down a large assignment into progressive steps that students can climb one at a time.  This allows them to build on their experience.  

Planning for a library session

  • Meet with your librarian early so that you have plenty of time to discuss the goals of your course and the purpose of your assignment.  That gives the librarian time to tailor the instructional experience to your students’ needs.
  • Schedule your library session(s) at a point in semester when your students are ready to learn and can soon use the skills and concepts the librarian is teaching.
  • Information is best presented in manageable segments of time.  Students retain information better in two 45-minute sessions than one 90-minute session, for instance.  For tutorial students, a series of short, related writing assignments are recommended over one long paper due at the end of the semester.
  • Plan the session at a time when you can be present.   Your participation indicates the importance you place on the library session.  It also allows you to see first-hand how your students conduct research and what obstacles they encounter.
  • There are a variety of expressions for a student’s academic research.  For examples, please see the sample library research assignments below.

Assessing the results

  • How do the students demonstrate what they’ve learned in the library session?   Graded research assignments, completed exercises from library sessions, or other methods can demonstrate if students have met your learning goals.
  • How effective was the library session?  Talk with your consulting librarian about ways to assess a session's impact. 

Sample library research assignments

There are many ways for students to learn from the findings of their academic research.  What follows is a sampling of possibilities, and librarians are always happy to work with you to create new assignments.   

Abstract or Executive Summary of a scholarly article.

Students are asked to read a scholarly article and write an abstract or executive summary of it, including the author’s thesis, argument, evidence, and conclusions.   

Anatomy of a Research Paper

Students conduct the research but do not actually write the paper (for your class): --clearly define topic --annotated bibliography of useful sources --outline of paper --thesis statement --opening paragraph and summary --present research findings to the class  

Annotated Bibliography

--A selected list with annotations describing and evaluating as well as explaining the relevance of these sources. --Students in a Shakespeare course read nine plays.  For their final written assignment, the students first had to identify a critical problem in one of the plays and to find twenty articles, books, or essays that discussed this problem.  From these twenty sources, students selected and annotated the best six sources covering the full range of the problem.  

Biographical Sketch

Students present a brief sketch of the author of a significant work of literature or history.  Students could use key reference sources and not online databases or the WWW.  

Briefing Paper

Students select a current problem and prepare a summary of the main issues involved and the proposed solutions, including the strengths and weaknesses of each solution.  Students may argue for the solution they think is best.   

Campaign Speech

Similar to the Briefing Paper, but students take a position and write a campaign speech to persuade voters to support that position.  

Compare Reference Sources

To facilitate interdisciplinary understanding, students research one topic in specialized reference sources covering a number of academic perspectives: Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 as discussed in the fields of economics, education, history, law and sociology, for example.   

Contemporary Conditions

Students write a brief two-three page statement on the social, ethical and political conditions contemporary to the major literary or historical work under study.  This assignment provides context for subsequent reading and study and integrates a limited number of both general and specialized reference tools.  

Contemporary Reception

Students collect and summarize book reviews of an important work.  This assignment requires students to use a specific research tool (book review indexes) for the time the original work was published.  

Credibility of a Course Reading

Students write an evaluative essay drawing on book reviews, biographical information, discussion and their own analysis.  

Cultural Context

Students in an international politics class first research another country and then watch the political news of the world through the eyes of someone in that country.  Class projects are can be prepared as diaries, letters, editorials, speeches, posters, interviews or any other creative method.   

Encyclopedia/Wikipedia Article

Students write or update an encyclopedia article, including a list of references OR students select a stub (placeholder for a topic) from Wikipedia and write an entry based on Wikipedia’s guidelines.  

Newspaper Article/ Letter to the Editor

Research a contemporary or historical event and then write an “objective” story OR students may choose to write a letter to the editor reacting to an event.  

The Practical Assignment

In a course on animal behavior for biology and psychology majors, students were asked to design an experiment in the field of animal behavior nutrition that proposed a research question so meaningful that a government agency or research institute might provide funding.  Students identified an appropriate funding agency, figured out the costs involved, and submitted a proposal describing the project with a supporting annotated bibliography.  Groups of students acted as reviewers for the proposals.  

Top Ten List

Develop a list of the most important, under-recognized or over-rated people, events or creations within a particular field of study and justify your selections.   

Understand Primary Sources

Students compare primary and secondary sources on the same topic, list and annotate both types of materials.    

Additional Assignments

  • Compare print and Web resources
  • Create a handbook or research manual
  • Create a poster, display or exhibit
  • Create a slide show, presentation or demonstration
  • Follow research trends
  • Maintain a research log
  • Update a review article
  • Write a book or film review
  • Write field notes
  • Write a literature review

Discipline Specific Information Literacy Standards: Anthropology and SociologyLiteratures in EnglishPolitical SciencePsychologyScience and Technology, and Teacher Education

Instruction Session Feedback Forms

Disciplinary Research Literacy Feedback Form and Tutorial Research Literacy Feedback Form

More Teaching and Learning Resources

Consulting Librarians                  

Library Lab

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Circulation

General Circulation Policies

Library materials that circulate outside the building must be checked out using your Pioneer One Card (or, for local residents, Drake Community Library card). You must present your card to library staff to check out library materials, including reserve readings. You are responsible for all materials checked out on your card, so it’s not a good idea to check things out for other people, or to lend what you have borrowed to others. The library will notify you by e-mail when books have been recalled, when interlibrary loan materials are ready for pickup, when items you have are overdue, and for other library-related matters. Be sure to check your e-mail every day.  You may view your record online from any computer with internet access; this will display all library items checked out, with their due dates.  You may renew most items online.  Grinnell College users log in with their network user name and password, and community members with their name and Grinnell College Libraries barcode.

Do not take material out of the library without checking it out. Not only does this inconvenience other students and faculty by depriving them of its use, but also it is an act of theft under the Code of Iowa, chapters 714.5 and 808.12. Taking non-checked-out material through the library security gate constitutes theft and the College reserves the right to prosecute offenders under the terms of this law, as well as to deal with violations through the college judicial system.

Access, use, and reproduction of the electronic journals, databases, and other resources made available through the Grinnell College Libraries are governed by contracts or license agreements between the College and publishers or third parties. In many cases, license agreements impose greater restrictions on use than does copyright law, and these terms may limit uses of non-copyrighted material. Members of the Grinnell College community are expected to make reasonable and good faith efforts to comply with the terms of these agreements. For further information, please see License Agreements and Academic Computer Use Policies.

Circulation Policies for Faculty and Staff

All checked-out materials are subject to immediate recall if needed for course reserves. Please have your Pioneer One-Card with you when checking out library materials.

Books

Books checked out to faculty/staff are due at the end of the academic year unless recalled by another patron. If recalled, books are due three weeks after the date of check out. If a book is recalled you will receive an email notice with a new due date. Recalls are enforced for all members of the campus community. The libraries, based on the recommendations of the Instructional Support Committee, have developed guidelines for handling the replacement of lost books, books that must be replaced due to significant damage, maximum number of books checked out at one time, and the procedure for renewals.

Recalling an Item

To recall an item that is currently checked out, click on the "Request" button toward the top of the screen of the online item record (login required). The item will be recalled, and you will be contacted (through email) when it arrives - this could be up to three weeks (see above).  If you are recalling the item to place on reserve, please contact the Circulation Desk - [circ] or x3350 - and they will expedite the recall.

Course Reserves

Normally, course reserves circulate for either two hours, four hours (recordings), one day, or three days. Link to course reserves for information about placing items on reserve for your classes. If you need to borrow one of your own course reserves, a circulation desk supervisor will help you check it out for the amount of time that you need to use it.

Permanent Reserve

These books, kept behind the circulation desk, normally circulate for two hours. If you need something that is on permanent reserve for a longer period, please check with a research librarian.

Video and Sound Recordings

Most video and sound recordings circulate to faculty/staff for four weeks. There are some items in the collection that are noncirculating. The catalog should give you this information. 

Reference Material

This collection is noncirculating. If you need material for a class presentation or another special purpose, please check with a librarian to find out if it is possible to arrange an exception to this policy.

Periodicals (magazines and journals)

Periodicals located on the fourth floor circulate for two weeks. They may be recalled three days after the checkout date. Recent issues of magazines and journals located in the current periodicals area do not circulate. If you need a copy of an article, please ask at the circulation desk. If you can wait for 24 hours, we will make the copy for you. The unbound issues of some journals and magazines are kept behind the circulation desk.  You must have your Pioneer One-Card to check these out. Locations for journals will be indicated in the catalog record. Please check with a research librarian, a circulation desk supervisor, or assistant for help in tracking down the volume or issue that you are looking for. You will also find current periodicals and older issues of journals and magazines in the Science Library.

Special Collections

Special Collections, located in the Iowa Room, includes the Iowa Room (a collection of faculty, staff, and alumni publications), Rare Books, and the Archives collections. These are noncirculating collections. Please visit the Iowa Room and speak with the archivist and special collections librarian for assistance in using this collection.

Microfilm

This is a noncirculating collection. If you need material for a class presentation or another special purpose, please check with a librarian to find out if it is possible to arrange an exception to this policy.

Newspapers

This collection is noncirculating. If you need material for a class presentation or another special purpose, please check with a librarian to find out if it is possible to arrange an exception to this policy.

Media Circulation

Burling Media Room and AV Center Circulation Policies

Basic Burling Media Room borrowing policies are included in the general borrowing policy pages for faculty,students, staff, visitors, and Grinnell residents.  Students may also consult pages 69-70 of the Grinnell College Student Handbook.

Loan Rules

All recordings may be used in the Burling Media Room or throughout Burling Library. You will find some videos housed on reserve in the AV Center. The online catalog will direct you to the appropriate location, or please stop by or call Randye Jones (3365), Burling Media Room supervisor, or Ralph Helt (3073), AV Center supervisor, for assistance in locating the audio or visual material you need. The following rules apply to items being checked out from either location:  

Faculty and Staff (excluding Music Faculty)

  • Audio Recordings-CDs and audio cassettes: circulate for four weeks.

  • Audio Recordings-Other ( LPs, reel-to-reel tapes) may not be checked out

  • Video Recordings may be checked out for classroom or private home use. Library-Use Only videos/DVDs may be checked out for a class or in preparation for a class. The Burling Media Room supervisor, a Circulation supervisor, or a Reference Librarian, or the AV Center staff may need to authorize check out. Videos and DVDs circulate for four weeks.  

 All faculty and staff must have their P-Card and may borrow up to the limits established for total numbers of libraries materials.  If the recordings are for classroom use, the Listening Room supervisor may make an exception to this rule.

Music Faculty

The loan rules are the same as above with the following exceptions:

Recordings-Other (see above for description) may be checked out without prior approval, but they must be checked out by the Listening Room supervisor, a Circulation supervisor, or a Reference Librarian. They are checked out for four weeks. All recordings should be procured in the Burling Media Room.

Students 

  • Recordings-CDs and audio cassettes may be checked out for one week. They are due back to the Burling Circulation Desk, Burling Media Room or AV Center by the location’s closing time. If a student is an authorized student assistant, s/he may check out recordings for the designated faculty member. Authorized students must have their own ID and the faculty member's ID or ID number to complete the transaction.
  • Recordings-Other (see above for description) may not be checked out (except for faculty by authorized student assistants).
  • Videos may be checked out for one week. They are due back to the Burling Circulation Desk, Burling Media Room or AV Center by the location’s closing time on the due date. If a student is an authorized student assistant, s/he may check out recordings for the designated faculty member. Authorized students must have their own ID and the faculty member's ID or ID number to complete the transaction. 

Students may have up to six recordings checked out at a time.  Recordings may be renewed once online, via telephone or in person if there are no restrictions on the item(s) or on the patron’s borrowing privileges.

Grinnell Residents and Visitors 

Local area residents may not check out Burling Media Room or AV Center recordings.  

Equipment

Four portable CD players are available for four-hour check out from the Burling Media Room. Headphones are also available but are restricted to use in the Burling Media Room.  Headsets for use outside the Listening Room are available at the Burling Circulation Desk.  For information about equipment in the AV Center, please call Ralph Helt, 3121, or go to the AV Center web site.

Borrowing Instructions

A valid Grinnell College ID is required to check out materials from the Burling Media Room.

Borrowers are responsible for the full replacement cost of lost or damaged material, plus a $20 processing fee and a $10 service charge.

Borrowers may not charge admission when using videos or DVDs, nor may these materials be used for fundraising or other commercial purposes. 

All videos and DVDs in the collection are loaned to individual users for their private use or for educational use. They may not be used or shown as part of any public program without the approval of the copyright owner. The libraries may be able to assist you in seeking permission for this. 

A limited number of  videos were obtained with public performing rights--which allows for campus sponsored showings as long as no admission is charged.  The titles may be found by keyword searching the library catalog for "public performance rights."  Please see Randye Jones, Burling Media Room supervisor, to discuss public performances rights and limitations.

Faculty may grant staff and/or student assistants the authority to check out Burling Media Room or AV Center items.  However, they must arrange this in advance by completing the permission form and submitting it to the Burling Library Circulation Department.  For the protection of patrons, there are no exceptions made to this policy.  

Overdues & Bills - Students

The fine for overdue recordings is $2.00 per item per day. Overdue notices are sent via e-mail. After three overdue notices, a bill is sent. The bill covers the replacement cost of the item, plus a $20 processing fee and a $10 service charge. If the item is returned, the bill is reduced to the accumulated fines but does not exceed $20.

Burling Media Room staff are not notified when these notices are sent; they are sent automatically by the system. If there is a problem or you wish to dispute a charge, contact the Burling Media Room Supervisor directly as soon as possible.

Overdues & Bills - Faculty/Staff

Faculty are not charged fines for overdue materials.

However, after 24 months, if the item has not been returned or renewed, you will be charged a replacement cost for each item. See the Faculty and Staff Loan Policy for more information.

Holds

If a Burling Media Room recording is checked out or otherwise not available for loan (i.e., the recording is "In Process"), patrons may place a hold on the recording.  With this hold, the patron would be immediately notified when the recording has been returned, and the recording would be held for them in the Burling Media Room for 24 hours.  If the item is "In Process" or "On Order," it would be rush cataloged and processed for the patron's use, and the patron would be notified when the recording is ready.

Recalls

In cases where faculty, staff or students have a class-related need for a recording that has been checked out, they may contact the Burling Media Room supervisor and request that the recording be recalled.  The supervisor may then contact the patron who has the recording checked out to arrange its early return.  Where possible, the recording may be returned within 24 hours; however, circumstances may require a much longer timeframe.  Patrons who have class-related need for a recording are encouraged to make arrangements as far in advance as feasible.

Media Recording

Media Recording Policy

Recording

The Burling Media Room has recording capability primarily from analog formats (LP, audio cassette, reel-to-reel audio tape) to digital (CD), with limited facility to record from VHS to DVD.  However, most recording is done only for class-related use and in strict adherence to copyright and fair use guidelines.

The recording of an entire work from a commercially produced recording is not usually permitted. If you need a tape or CD made for a class presentation, please speak to the Burling Media Room supervisor to get a copy of the Recording Request Form. Any questions concerning this policy should be directed to the Burling Media Room Supervisor or the Collection Development Librarian.

 On-Campus Concert Recordings and Taping

Recitals and concerts given by Grinnell College faculty, staff and students are recorded by the Music Department and the archival copy is housed in the Burling Media Room. Some of these recordings are included in our online catalog; please ask if you do not find the recording you are looking for. Generally, these recordings may be copied for the cost of the CD, DVD or tape, currently $1.00 - $2.00, depending on the length of the recording. Please speak to a Burling Media Room staff member if you are interested.

AV Center Recordings

Additional on-campus recordings may be available at the AV Center. Please contact the AV Center staff for more information.  

Course Reserves

About Course Reserves

Definition and Purpose of Course Reserves

Course reserves are materials (including books, AV materials, journal articles, electronic resources, instructional equipment and non-book items) chosen by the faculty to support class instruction. The materials are maintained in a separate location within a library, and access to the material is more restricted than is the access to items in general circulation. The purpose of a reserve collection is to:

  • Support the needs of a defined group of patrons within the Grinnell College community (usually a class)
  • Provide timely, convenient, and efficient access to high-demand materials; and
  • Protect materials that are at a high risk of theft or vandalism.

Several of the general principles that govern the acquisition of materials for the Grinnell College Libraries support the use of the material in the course reserve system. In particular:

  • All collections in the Grinnell College Libraries, regardless of format, are acquired by the College for nonprofit educational purposes by students, staff, faculty and authorized users.
  • All library materials are acquired with the understanding that there will be multiple uses made of the item.
  • With journals, the Grinnell College Libraries frequently must pay a premium institutional subscription price, which may be many times an individual subscription price, for the privilege of supporting multiple academic users.

The Libraries' course reserve systems are a traditional library service that will be provided in a manner that respects the rights of copyright holders and the limitations to those rights as specified in current copyright law. Refer to the links at the left for information on placing books and articles on physical or electronic reserve. For reserve requests concerning videos, CD's or streaming, please refer to the Burling Media Room webpage.

General Copyright Guidelines for Course Reserves

The Grinnell College guidelines on copying for course reserve reading services derive from the fair use provisions of the copyright law of the United States as found in Section 107 of Title 17 of the United States Code. Section 107 expressly permits the making of multiple copies for classroom use. Such educational copying is one of the six illustrative examples of acceptable fair use given in the section. The text of Section 107 is:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified in that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship or research, is not an infringement of copyright. In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include

  1. the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes;
  2. the nature of the copyrighted work;
  3. the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole; and
  4. the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work.

The fact that a work is unpublished shall not itself bar a finding of fair use if such finding is made upon consideration of all the above factors."

The Libraries reserve the right to refuse to place on course reserve any material that appears to violate these copyright guidelines. The reproduction of copyright-protected works for library reserve services falls into an unsettled area of the law which may be addressed in future revisions of the copyright law or through adjudication. Grinnell College will monitor legal developments which may affect the fair use analysis of reserve services to ensure that library services are in compliance with the letter and spirit of the United States copyright law.  

Copyright Resources

U.S. Copyright Office

Grinnell College Copyright Policy

ALA Model Policy Concerning College and University Photocopying

ALA Fair Use and Electronic Reserves

Copyright term and the public domain

Using Electronic Reserves:  Guidelines and Best Practices for Copyright Compliance

The Campus Guide to Copyright Compliance

The University of Texas System's Crash Course in Copyright: A thorough tutorial in basic copyright for higher education by Georgia Harper at The University of Texas at Austin

Placing Books and Journal Issues on Reserve

General Guidelines

At the request of the instructor, the Libraries will place on physical reserve published copies of monographs, textbooks, media such as CDs and DVDs, and similar material for the non-commercial, educational use of students. Books, journal issues (bound or unbound), and media items that are owned by the Grinnell College Libraries, other College departments, or individual members of the College faculty may be placed on library reserve without restrictions. If class size justifies, the Libraries will order additional copies. For desired course reserves books not owned by the Libraries, the faculty member or the department, the libraries will initiate expedited orders to purchase.

Course Reserves and Interlibrary Loan

The national interlibrary loan code prohibits borrowing books and other material from other libraries for the purpose of placing them on reserve at the borrowing institution.

How to place a book on reserve

To place a on reserve a book or journal issue owned by the Grinnell College Libraries, faculty, or department, bring the book to the Burling Circulation Desk and complete a book reserve request form. (Please note: the reserve item must be the actual book, not a photocopied portion.)

How to place a media item on reserve

To place on reserve a media item owned by the Libraries, faculty member, or department, please complete this form. Note that media items may be on reserve at the Burling Circulation Desk or in the AV Center.

Placing Articles or Book Chapters on Electronic Reserve

General Guidelines

Under appropriate circumstances, electronic scans created from books or journal issues owned by the Grinnell College Libraries, other College departments, or the instructor may be used for course reserves readings.

If the College has licensed electronic access to an article, a link will be created through the course reserve list in the Libraries' catalog. Copies of the electronic file will not be downloaded into the electronic reserve system.

Copies or scans created from journal issues or books that are not owned by the Grinnell College Libraries, other College departments, or the instructor may be used in course reserve only with permission of the copyright owner and payment of any requisite fee. Fair use does not apply in such cases.

In cases where Fair Use does not apply, the Libraries are responsible for requesting copyright permission on behalf of the College and the instructor. Copyright royalty payments are limited to $150 for an individual item or a cumulative total of $1000 for all the items on reserve for a particular course. Charges in excess will be the responsibility of the instructor, the department, or the concentration. Exceptions may be requested from the Librarian of the College.

Considerations Regarding "Fair Use" and Copyright

Reserve requests should be made through the Electronic Reserve Request Form. The Libraries work closely with Academic Support Assistants  in completing faculty requests for course reserve. In general, the Support Assistants are responsible for copying and scanning course reserve materials and delivering those to the Library, while the Library is responsible for researching and managing copyright clearances, checking for online availability of requested texts, posting files in the electronic reserve system, and creating index entries. Faculty with electronic reserve requests should generally initiate those requests with their support assistants. Please keep in mind the following considerations:

  • The source of the reproduction must be "lawfully owned."  Lawfully owned sources include:
    • Library-owned copies of books and journal issues.
    • Instructor-owned copies of books and journal issues.
  • The reproduction will include either the original copyright notice or -- if there is no notice published in the item -- a generic copyright warning: "This material may be protected by copyright. Further dissemination is prohibited."
  • The reproduction will represent a small proportion of the whole copyrighted work.  Requests for amounts that exceed these guidelines will require copyright permission and (as determined by the copyright owner) payment of a royalty.
  • The duration of access will be limited: access to electronic copies will be removed at the end of the course and photocopies supplied by faculty will be returned by the end of the semester (or sooner if not needed for physical reserve).
  • Access to the reproduction will be limited to enrolled students of the course.
  • The Libraries will not reproduce or accept for print or electronic reserve works intended to be "consumable" in the course of studying or teaching such as published workbooks, exercises, standardized tests, test booklets and answer sheets. However, exercises, tests, and similar material created by the instructor may be copied and/or placed on Reserve at the instructor's request.

How to Request an Electronic Reserve

Before placing a request:

  • Make sure you have not already ordered this item.  Duplicate requests slow the entire process down.
  • Check to see if you are using an original source. Anthologies and compilations should have a notice of the original copyright source. If the professor has no preference, please use an original source whenever possible.
  • Double check the book title, article title, and page numbers.
  • Match the article title to the dropbox title.

Use the Electronic Reserve Request Form. Refer to instructions below to complete the form:

  • Date needed by: Please give us two weeks to process and acquire permission for the item if at all possible.
  • Course number: Please be sure to add the department along with the course number. Some professors teach two or more disciplines, and we need to ensure that every item goes on the correct course list. If you have more than one professor teaching the same course, different sections and want to request permission for the same articles [if possible] please try to send the individual requests on the same day. This will help us in contacting rights holders directly.
  • Number of students: We cannot process e-reserves without knowing how many people will have access to the articles. Generally, permission is paid for per page, per student. If you are unsure of how many students will ultimately be a part of the course, use your best guess and we can adjust this number when class is in session.
  • Title of chapter or article: We try to use this title exactly when placing items on e-reserve. Please double check the spelling in this field so that no errors transfer to confuse the students. This should also be part of the title in the dropbox for ease of location. There should be one title per pdf in the dropbox. Please do not try to request more than one e-reserve per request form.
  • Author: This is the author or editor you wish to have show up on the course reserves list. Again, please double check your spelling for errors that might confuse the students. It is a good idea to put the author’s name before the article title as the dropbox file name.
  • Title of Book or Journal: This is an important piece of information, as we often use this to determine who holds copyright information.
  • Publisher name: The publisher is generally found on the title page or the back of the title page. There are many times when several publishers have a book of the same title, and so this can be a vital piece of obtaining permission for a specific work.
  • ISBN / ISSN: (International Standard Book Number / International Standard Serial Number) These numbers can be found most often on the title page (for journals) or the back of the title page (for journals and books). Some older books will not have an ISBN. ISBNs are either 10 or 13 numbers long. ISSNs are generally 8 numbers long (xxxx-xxxx). If at all possible, please include this field. This is perhaps the most time-saving field among the list.
  • Volume: (for journals) If you do not have a date of issue, this field is vital to find the source information.
  • Issue: Please add if known.
  • Page numbers: We cannot process an e-reserve without this information. PDF files should contain only pages that are part of the required reading. Extra pages must be paid for. Please remember that we can process no more than 25% of the total number of pages for any item.
  • Date: Please add the year of publication. This is now required by the Copyright Clearance Center for an item to be processed by them. The year of publication is generally found on the back of the title page.
  • Edition: This field is optional.
  • Article is: Please determine whether this is first-time use (the first time an article from this source has been used by this professor for this course), or used before (this article has been used by this professor for this course in the past).
  • Deposited in circ drop box: Unless the article is accessible through a full-text database or website, please ensure that the article is available for this professor/course in an easily found manner in the dropbox. The preferred naming convention is “Author_TitleOfArticle.” In Adobe, please ensure that you rotate pages before saving so that the article can be read on the computer screen if so desired. If you have questions regarding how to do this, please let us know.
  • Source of scanned document: Please be accurate with this. If you indicate the item is owned by the library and it is not, the library will have to pay copyright fees, regardless of whether it should be first-time use or not. An accurate answer here will go a long way to providing the e-reserve quickly and cheaply.
  • URL: If the item is found in our online databases, this is not a required field. If, however, the professor has a website that should be read, or a full-text source which is open to the public, this can be placed here. Professors with personal subscriptions to online databases cannot link e-reserves through their course reserve list. The item will have to be ordered and placed on e-reserve as a pdf file.
  • Notes: Please use this field to provide information that you feel is important, but doesn’t fit into one of the other categories.
Request Forms

Electronic Reserve Request Form​

Print Reserve Request Form

Streaming Audio Request (Multi-Track, Single Recording)

Streaming Audio Request (Multi-Title)

Recordings Reserve Request

Other Services for Faculty and Staff

For Visitors

Visitors

Although we do not circulate materials to visitors who are not residents of the local area, we welcome you to our libraries and will be happy to assist you in using our collections while you are in the buildings. All of our book and periodical stacks are open for browsing. Our electronic subscriptions are generally available for your use while you are in the building. Our online catalog is freely available on the Web wherever you have Web access. You will know that you have landed on restricted access when you are prompted for a username and password. If there is something you would like to check out from our collections, please go through your local public library and take advantage of its interlibrary loan program.  

Local Area Residents

We encourage local residents to obtain borrowing privileges at the Grinnell College Libraries - requirements:

  •     Of at least high school age
  •     Live within 20 miles of Grinnell College
  •     Have a Drake Community Library Card (Grinnell Public Library)
  •     Have a valid email address

Please bring your Drake Community Library card (the wallet-sized one, not the keychain card) to the Burling Library circulation desk to set up a patron record.  A Grinnell College Libraries barcode will be affixed to your card.  All checked out materials are subject to immediate recall if needed for Course Reserves.

Books

Books circulate for two weeks. If your book has not been requested by a member of the campus community, you may renew books by phone (269-3350) or online using your Grinnell College Libraries bar code.  Local area residents may check out up to 10 books at one time.

Course Reserves

You may check these books out only if you are enrolled in a Grinnell College course.

Videos and CD's

This collection, located in both the Burling Library Media Room and the AV Center in ARH, is reserved for members of the campus community although it is possible to use material in the Media Room if you can leave appropriate security. 

Periodicals (magazines and journals)

You may use periodicals while in Burling or the Science Library. They may not be checked out.

Reference Materials

This is a non-circulating collection. Please see a research librarian for assistance.

Special Collections

Special Collections, located in the Iowa Room, includes the Iowa Room (a collection of faculty, staff, and alumni publications), Rare Books, and the Archives collections. These are noncirculating collections. Please visit the Iowa Room and speak with the Archivist and Special Collections librarian for assistance in using this collection.

Maps and Atlases

This is a non-circulating collection. Please see a research librarian for assistance.

Microfilm

This is a noncirculating collection. Please see a research librarian, circulation desk supervisor, or student assistant for assistance.

Newspapers

This is a non-circulating collection. Please see a research librarian for assistance.

Curriculum Library

This collection is primarily intended for students enrolled in education courses and student teaching.