Opportunities

Writing Contests

In Creative Writing

The James Norman Hall '10 Aspiring Writer Award

This prize was established in 2007 by Nancy Hall Rutgers and her husband Nicholas Rutgers Jr. to honor Nancy's father, James Norman Hall '10, the author of Mutiny on the Bounty. The prize consists of a cash award of $2,000, which must be used to cover the expenses of writing projects and/or attendance at a writing conference or workshop during the summer following the awarding of the prize. The winner is determined through an annual competition, judged every spring semester.

Deadline: Friday, February 14, 2014, 4:00 p.m.

Rules and Guidelines

1. Entrants must be currently enrolled Grinnell College sophomores or juniors in good standing.

2. Entries may include up to six poems or up to fifteen pages of prose and must include a one-paragraph description of how the award will be used. Entries should be typed and prose should be double spaced. Only one entry per student is permitted for this award.

 3. Entrants' names should NOT appear on the pages of submitted work. Please include a cover sheet listing name, mailbox number, and the title(s) of the piece(s) submitted. Cover sheets will be removed for judging so that the entries may be judged anonymously.

4. Submit entries in TWO forms. Hard copies should be brought to Mears Cottage 103, Academic Support Office. (No staples, please.) An electronic copy should also be submitted as an attachment to [dudleyd[at]grinnell[dot]edu]. No late entries will be accepted.

 5. Award winners will be announced at the Grinnell Review Reading, Thursday, May 8, 2014.

6.The award winner will be required to submit a report at the end of the summer and correspond with the donors.

Please direct any inquiries about the contest to Ralph Savarese, English Department, in 203 Mears Cottage or e-mail savarese[at]grinnell[dot]edu.

Frequency: 

 Annually

In Fiction

The Nick Adams Short Story Prize

The Associated Colleges of the Midwest sponsors the Nick Adams Short Story Contest, which is named for the young hero of many Hemingway stories. The contest was established in 1973 with funds from an anonymous donor to encourage young writers. A cash award of $1000 is given to the winner. Clare Boerigter, Spanish major, was the last Grinnell student to win for her story "€œGusanos"€ in 2012.

Deadline: Friday, February 7, 2014, 4:00 p.m.

Rules and Guidelines

 1. Entrants must be currently enrolled Grinnell College students in good standing, but need not be English majors or enrolled in an English course.

 2. Submitted stories need not be written especially for the contest, but stories cannot have been previously published off-campus. 

3. Each manuscript is limited to 10,000 words.

4. Each submission should include a removable title page or cover sheet with the author's name as well as the author's campus and home addresses.  The author's name should not appear anywhere else in the submission.

5. The title of the story must also appear on the first page of the story.

6. No more than two entries may be the work of one student.

7. Submit entries to the Academic Support Office in Mears 103. Also submit an electronic copy to [dudleyd[at]grinnell[dot]edu]. No late entries will be accepted.

8. Grinnell College may submit a maximum of four entries to the ACM faculty committee. A small committee of ACM faculty members will screen the stories. Approximately six stories will then be submitted for final judging by a notable author outside the consortium.

9. The winner of the contest will be announced in May and will receive an award check for $1,000. The prize will be awarded only if the final reader finds a story of sufficient excellence.

Please direct any inquiries about the contest to Ralph Savarese, English Department, in 203 Mears Cottage or e-mail savarese[at]grinnell[dot]edu.

Frequency: 

 Annually

The Henry York Steiner Memorial Prize for Short Fiction 

The Henry York Steiner Memorial Prize for Short Fiction was established as part of the Steiner Prize, established in 1913 by Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Steiner of Grinnell who endowed the annual award of a prize "for some form of creative art." The winners of the prizes are decided through an annual competition, judged every spring semester. A cash award of $500 for first prize and two awards of $100 each for second prize will be given.

Deadline: Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 4:00 p.m.

Rules and Guidelines:

1. Entrants must be currently enrolled Grinnell College students in good standing.

 2. A poem or story is eligible for a prize if it has appeared in the Grinnell Review during the academic year of the prize--in other words, if it has appeared in the Fall semester's Grinnell Review. It cannot have appeared in a previous year's Grinnell Review, even if it has been significantly revised, nor have won a monetary prize or been a finalist at Grinnell College. Only students who are taking at least twelve credits on campus or in a Grinnell-approved study abroad program are eligible to submit their work.

3. Entrants may submit one or two short stories (typed, double-spaced).

4. Entrants' names should NOT appear on the pages of submitted work. Instead, an attached cover sheet should include the entrants' name, mailbox number, and story title. Cover sheets will be removed for judging so that the entries may be judged anonymously.

5. Clip rather than staple entries.

6. Submit entries to Mears Cottage 103, Academic Support Office. Also submit an electronic copy to [dudleyd[at]grinnell[dot]edu]. No late entries will be accepted.

7. Cash awards are $500 for first prize and $100 each for two second prize winners.

8. Award winners will be announced at the Grinnell Review Reading, Thursday, May 8, 2014.

Please direct any inquiries about the contest to Ralph Savarese, English Department, in 203 Mears Cottage or e-mail savarese[at]grinnell[dot]edu.

Frequency: 

 Annually

In Poetry

The Lorabel Richardson/Academy of American Poets Prize for the best single poem 

The Lorabel Richardson/Academy of American Poets Prize is awarded for the best single poem to Grinnell poets in memory of Lorabel Richardson (Class of 1919). Ms. Richardson, who as a student won the Steiner Prize for Short Fiction in 1917, worked her whole professional life as an English teacher in the public schools in Marshalltown, Iowa. The prize, which is administered through the Academy of American Poets, was established in 1993 through a fund established by Louise Haug of Ames, Iowa. The Academy's nationwide program makes awards of $100 for the best undergraduate poetry produced each year. 

 Deadline: Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 4:00 p.m.

Rules and Guidelines:

1. Entrants must be currently enrolled Grinnell College students in good standing.

 2. A poems are eligible for a prize if it they have appeared in the Grinnell Review during the academic year of the prize--in other words, if they have appeared in the Fall semester's Grinnell Review.They cannot have appeared in a previous year's Grinnell Review, even if they have been significantly revised, nor have won a monetary prize or been a finalist at Grinnell College. Only students who are taking at least twelve credits on campus or in a Grinnell-approved study abroad program are eligible to submit their work. 

3. Entrants' names should NOT appear on the pages of submitted work. Instead, an attached cover sheet should include the entrants' name, mailbox number, and story title. Cover sheets will be removed for judging so that the entries may be judged anonymously.

 4.  You may submit up to three poems. 

 5. Clip rather than staple entries.

6. Submit entries to Mears Cottage 103, Academic Support Office. Also submit an electronic copy to [dudleyd[at]grinnell[dot]edu]. No late entries will be accepted.

7. A cash award of $100 is given for the Lorabel Richardson/ Academy of American Poets Contest.

 8. Award winner will be announced at the Grinnell Review Reading, Thursday, May 8, 2014.

Please direct any inquiries about the contest to Ralph Savarese, English Department, in 203 Mears Cottage or e-mail savarese[at]grinnell[dot]edu.

Frequency: 

 Annually

The Selden Whitcomb Prize in Poetry for the best collection of 4 poems

The Selden Whitcomb Prize in Poetry for the best collection of 4 poems was established by Edna Osborne Whitcomb, widow of Selden Lincoln Whitcomb, as a bequest made to the college at the time of her death in 1932. Selden Whitcomb was a Grinnell graduate (Class of 1887) who also taught here from 1895-1905, serving eventually as the Chair of the English department. The conditions of Mrs. Whitcomb's bequest state that "the prize, or prizes, if there is enough for several, shall be awarded annually for the best original poetry written during the year by Grinnell students in the College." The winners of the prize are decided through an annual competition judged in spring semester.

Deadline: Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 4:00 p.m. 

 Rules and Guidelines:

1.Entrants must be currently enrolled Grinnell College students in good standing.

2. Poems are eligible for the prize if they have appeared in the Grinnell Review during the academic year of the prize--in other words, if they have appeared in the Fall semester's Grinnell Review. They cannot have appeared in a previous year's Grinnell Review, even if they have been significantly revised, nor have won a monetary prize or been a finalist at Grinnell College. Only students who are taking at least twelve credits on campus or in a Grinnell-approved study abroad program are eligible to submit their work.

3. Entrants may submit one of four poems.

4. Entrants' names should NOT appear on the pages of submitted work. Instead, an attached cover sheet should include the entrants' name, mailbox number, and story title. Cover sheets will be removed for judging so that the entries may be judged anonymously.

5. Clip rather than staple entries.

 6. Submit entries to Mears Cottage 103, Academic Support Office. Also submit an electronic copy to [dudleyd[at]grinnell[dot]edu]. No late entries will be accepted.

7. Cash awards are $500 for first prize and $100 each for two second prize winners.

8. Award winners will be announced at the Grinnell Review Reading, Thursday, May 8, 2014.

Please direct any inquiries about the contest to Ralph Savarese, English Department, in 203 Mears Cottage or e-mail savarese[at]grinnell[dot]edu.

Frequency: 

 Annually

In Playwriting
  • Part of the Steiner Award bequest, mentioned above, The Henry York Steiner Memorial Prize for Playwriting is awarded when the Theater faculty identify a deserving piece of student-written drama.

Academic Opportunities

Awards, Grants, Scholarships, and Fellowships

Henry York Steiner Memorial Prize for Short Fiction

The Henry York Steiner Memorial Prize for Short Fiction was established as part of the Steiner Prize, established in 1913 by Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Steiner of Grinnell who endowed the annual award of a prize "for some form of creative art." The winners of the prizes are decided through an annual competition, judged every spring semester. A cash award of $500 for first prize and two awards of $100 each for second prize will be given.

Deadline: Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 4:00 p.m. 

  • Entrants must be currently enrolled Grinnell College students in good standing.
  • A poem or story is eligible for a prize if it has appeared in the Grinnell Review during the academic year of the prize--in other words, if it has appeared in the Fall semester's Grinnell Review. It cannot have appeared in a previous year's Grinnell Review, even if it has been significantly revised, nor have won a monetary prize or been a finalist at Grinnell College. Only students who are taking at least twelve credits on campus or in a Grinnell-approved study abroad program are eligible to submit their work.
  • Entrants may submit one or two short stories (typed, double-spaced).
  • Entrants' names should NOT appear on the pages of submitted work. Instead, an attached cover sheet should include the entrants' name, mailbox number, and story title. Cover sheets will be removed for judging so that the entries may be judged anonymously.
  • Clip rather than staple entries.
  • Submit entries to Mears Cottage 103, Academic Support Office. Also submit an electronic copy to [dudleyd[at]grinnell[dot]edu]. No late entries will be accepted.
  • Cash awards are $500 for first prize and $100 each for two second prize winners.
  • Award winners will be announced at the Grinnell Review Reading in May.

Please direct any inquiries about the contest to Ralph Savarese, English Department, in 203 Mears Cottage or e-mail savarese[at]grinnell[dot]edu.

 

James Norman Hall '10 Aspiring Writer Award

This prize was established in 2007 by Nancy Hall Rutgers and her husband Nicholas Rutgers Jr. to honor Nancy's father, James Norman Hall '10, the author of Mutiny on the Bounty. The prize consists of a cash award of $2,000, which must be used to cover the expenses of writing projects and/or attendance at a writing conference or workshop during the summer following the awarding of the prize. The winner is determined through an annual competition, judged every spring semester.

Deadline: Friday, February 14, 2014, 4:00 p.m.

  • Entrants must be currently enrolled Grinnell College sophomores or juniors in good standing.
  • Entries may include up to six poems or up to fifteen pages of prose and must include a one-paragraph description of how the award will be used. Entries should be typed and prose should be double spaced. Only one entry per student is permitted for this award.
  • Entrants' names should NOT appear on the pages of submitted work. Please include a cover sheet listing name, mailbox number, and the title(s) of the piece(s) submitted. Cover sheets will be removed for judging so that the entries may be judged anonymously.
  • Submit entries in TWO forms. Hard copies should be brought to Mears Cottage 103, Academic Support Office. (No staples, please.) An electronic copy should also be submitted as an attachment to [dudleyd[at]grinnell[dot]edu]. No late entries will be accepted.
  • Award winners will be announced at the Grinnell Review Reading in May.
  • The award winner will be required to submit a report at the end of the summer and correspond with the donors.

Please direct any inquiries about the contest to Ralph Savarese, English Department, in 203 Mears Cottage or e-mail savarese[at]grinnell[dot]edu.

 

Lorabel Richardson/Academy of American Poets Prize

The Lorabel Richardson/Academy of American Poets Prize is awarded for the best single poem to Grinnell poets in memory of Lorabel Richardson (Class of 1919). Ms. Richardson, who as a student won the Steiner Prize for Short Fiction in 1917, worked her whole professional life as an English teacher in the public schools in Marshalltown, Iowa. The prize, which is administered through the Academy of American Poets, was established in 1993 through a fund established by Louise Haug of Ames, Iowa. The Academy's nationwide program makes awards of $100 for the best undergraduate poetry produced each year. 

Deadline: Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 4:00 p.m. 

  • Entrants must be currently enrolled Grinnell College students in good standing.
  • A poems are eligible for a prize if it they have appeared in the Grinnell Review during the academic year of the prize--in other words, if they have appeared in the Fall semester's Grinnell Review.They cannot have appeared in a previous year's Grinnell Review, even if they have been significantly revised, nor have won a monetary prize or been a finalist at Grinnell College. Only students who are taking at least twelve credits on campus or in a Grinnell-approved study abroad program are eligible to submit their work. 
  • Entrants' names should NOT appear on the pages of submitted work. Instead, an attached cover sheet should include the entrants' name, mailbox number, and story title. Cover sheets will be removed for judging so that the entries may be judged anonymously.
  • You may submit up to three poems. 
  • Clip rather than staple entries.
  • Submit entries to Mears Cottage 103, Academic Support Office. Also submit an electronic copy to [dudleyd[at]grinnell[dot]edu]. No late entries will be accepted.
  • A cash award of $100 is given for the Lorabel Richardson/ Academy of American Poets Contest.
  • Award winner will be announced at the Grinnell Review Reading in May.

Please direct any inquiries about the contest to Ralph Savarese, English Department, in 203 Mears Cottage or e-mail savarese[at]grinnell[dot]edu.

 

Nick Adams Short Story Contest

The Associated Colleges of the Midwest sponsors the Nick Adams Short Story Contest, which is named for the young hero of many Hemingway stories. The contest was established in 1973 with funds from an anonymous donor to encourage young writers. A cash award of $1000 is given to the winner.

Deadline: Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 4:00 p.m. 

  • Entrants must be currently enrolled Grinnell College students in good standing, but need not be English majors or enrolled in an English course.
  • Submitted stories need not be written especially for the contest, but stories cannot have been previously published off-campus. 
  • Each manuscript is limited to 10,000 words.
  • Each submission should include a removable title page or cover sheet with the author's name as well as the author's campus and home addresses.  The author's name should not appear anywhere else in the submission.
  • The title of the story must also appear on the first page of the story.
  • No more than two entries may be the work of one student.
  • Submit entries to the Academic Support Office in Mears 103. Also submit an electronic copy to [dudleyd[at]grinnell[dot]edu]. No late entries will be accepted.
  • Grinnell College may submit a maximum of four entries to the ACM faculty committee. A small committee of ACM faculty members will screen the stories. Approximately six stories will then be submitted for final judging by a notable author outside the consortium.
  • The winner of the contest will be announced in May and will receive an award check for $1,000. The prize will be awarded only if the final reader finds a story of sufficient excellence.

Please direct any inquiries about the contest to Ralph Savarese, English Department, in 203 Mears Cottage or e-mail savarese[at]grinnell[dot]edu.

 

Selden Whitcomb Prize in Poetry

The Selden Whitcomb Prize in Poetry for the best collection of 4 poems was established by Edna Osborne Whitcomb, widow of Selden Lincoln Whitcomb, as a bequest made to the college at the time of her death in 1932. Selden Whitcomb was a Grinnell graduate (Class of 1887) who also taught here from 1895-1905, serving eventually as the Chair of the English department. The conditions of Mrs. Whitcomb's bequest state that "the prize, or prizes, if there is enough for several, shall be awarded annually for the best original poetry written during the year by Grinnell students in the College." The winners of the prize are decided through an annual competition judged in spring semester.

Deadline: Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 4:00 p.m. 

  • Entrants must be currently enrolled Grinnell College students in good standing.
  • Poems are eligible for the prize if they have appeared in the Grinnell Review during the academic year of the prize--in other words, if they have appeared in the Fall semester's Grinnell Review. They cannot have appeared in a previous year's Grinnell Review, even if they have been significantly revised, nor have won a monetary prize or been a finalist at Grinnell College. Only students who are taking at least twelve credits on campus or in a Grinnell-approved study abroad program are eligible to submit their work.
  • Entrants may submit one of four poems.
  • Entrants' names should NOT appear on the pages of submitted work. Instead, an attached cover sheet should include the entrants' name, mailbox number, and story title. Cover sheets will be removed for judging so that the entries may be judged anonymously.
  • Clip rather than staple entries.
  • Submit entries to Mears Cottage 103, Academic Support Office. Also submit an electronic copy to [dudleyd[at]grinnell[dot]edu]. No late entries will be accepted.
  • Cash awards are $500 for first prize and $100 each for two second prize winners.
  • Award winners will be announced at the Grinnell Review Reading in May.

Please direct any inquiries about the contest to Ralph Savarese, English Department, in 203 Mears Cottage or e-mail savarese[at]grinnell[dot]edu.

 

Writing Grant

The Writing Grant supports internships in organizations focusing on writing as a profession. Applicants should describe one or more specific pieces of writing they will produce during their proposed internship.

For more information, please contact Janet Carl.

 

Fulbright Grants

In general, there are two types of Fulbright grants:

  • A Fulbright Full Grant, which funds one academic year of overseas study and/or research in one country
  • An English Teaching Assistantship (ETA), which funds one academic year of teaching English in one country

Additionally, Fulbright offers several specialized grants, including Travel-Only Grants (which are usually given to graduate students, and only for Italy, Germany, and Hungary), Fulbright/mtvU Awards, Critical Language Enhancement Awards, Fulbright Business Grants (Mexico, Spain, and the Netherlands), Fulbright Journalism Grants (Germany and UK), and Country-Specific Awards to Australia (CSIRO), Ireland (Irish Language), Italy (Slow Foods and Deaf Studies), Mexico (Graduate Degree and Public Policy); and the Netherlands (Water Management).

More information: http://us.fulbrightonline.org

Application: https://apply.embark.com/student/fulbright/usa/26/

 

Gates Cambridge Scholarships

Gates Cambridge Scholarships are highly competitive full-cost awards for full-time graduate study and research in any subject available at the University of Cambridge.

More information: http://www.gatescambridge.org/

Application: http://www.gatescambridge.org/apply/

 

Marshall Scholarships

Marshall Scholarships finance young Americans of high ability to study for a degree in the United Kingdom. Up to forty Scholars are selected each year to study at graduate level at an UK institution in any field of study.

More information: http://www.marshallscholarship.org/

Application: http://www.marshallscholarship.org/applications/apply

 

Mitchell Scholarship

The Mitchell Scholarship Program, named to honor former US Senator George Mitchell's pivotal contribution to the Northern Ireland peace process, is designed to introduce and connect generations of future American leaders to the island of Ireland, while recognizing and fostering intellectual achievement, leadership, and a commitment to community and public service.

Up to twelve Mitchell Scholars between the ages of 18 and 30 are chosen annually for one year of postgraduate study in any discipline offered by institutions of higher learning in Ireland and Northern Ireland.

More information: http://www.us-irelandalliance.org/content/3/en/George%20Mitchell%20Scholarship%20Program%20|%20US-Ireland%20Alliance.html

Application: http://www.us-irelandalliance.org/content/43/en/Applying%20to%20the%20George%20Mitchell%20Scholarship%20Program.html

 

Rhodes Scholarships

Rhodes Scholarships, the oldest international educational fellowships, were initiated after the death of Cecil Rhodes in 1902, and bring outstanding students from many countries around the world to the University of Oxford.

More information: http://www.rhodesscholar.org/

Application: http://www.rhodesscholar.org/applying-for-the-scholarship/

Activities and Organizations

Connelly Lectures

The Connelly Lectures in English are named for Peter Connelly, who was a member of the English Department at Grinnell College from 1970 until his death in 2000 and the Carter-Adams Professor of Literature at Grinnell beginning in 1989. An active scholar throughout his teaching career, Connelly published two articles on Pope's Iliad and others on teaching and college literacy, in addition to giving numerous papers at professional meetings. Connelly's scholarly interest in Pope's translation of Homer reflected a broader interest in the translator's status as "a creator and not a transmitter of an original text," as Connelly's Grinnell colleague Michael Cavanagh puts it. Cavanagh continues: "this was not merely an idea that Peter had but a kind of axiom of his life. It permeated his thinking on every subject.... Peter was really a creator--a term, I might add, he would completely reject." Another Grinnell colleague, D.A. Smith, called Connelly "emphatically a man of this world whether by that be meant the petit pays of Grinnell College or the wider worlds of state, of nation, and of letters. He knew the duties and the rewards of citizenship in each, and he received the grateful thanks and the unqualified admiration of his fellow citizens everywhere." Such admiration came from Connelly's students, including the Grinnell Class of 1999, which made Connelly one of its honorary members, saying, "Peter Connelly is a professor who has been as active outside the classroom as he has been inside. His vast knowledge of literature and literary theory and his intellectual integrity are impressive.... He is willing and ready to advise students on their career and life choices; he is an outstanding teacher who remains a friend to many of his students." In accepting his honor, he said, "I think I've never been in better company."

We have so far hosted four Connelly Lecturers: Diedre Lynch in Fall 2004, Jahan Ramazani in Fall 2007, Gene Jarrett in Fall 2009 and Patrick Cheney in Fall 2011.  

Creative Writing

Grinnell has a vibrant creative writing scene. There are many published writers on campus--faculty, staff, and students, along with a number of published writers living in town. The College regularly hosts workshops and readings headlined by prominent authors, many of which have been recipients of major awards: Nobel Prizes, Pulitzer Prizes, National Book Awards, and MacArthur Fellowships. Grinnell's proximity to Iowa City, site of the prestigious University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, makes it an easy stop on the reading train, as authors with newly published books often arrange a mini Iowa circuit. (Our location also allows Grinnellians to zip into Iowa City to catch a famous writer if, for whatever reason, they can't make it to Grinnell.) In addition to the many professional readings--some six or seven a semester--there are all sorts of student readings and open-mic sessions. Each semester culminates with a formal reading from the Grinnell Review, the College's undergraduate creative writing journal, where students are eligible for annual prizes in fiction and poetry, accompanied with monetayr awards.

Distinguished Authors at Grinnell

Each year, usually in the spring, a distinguished author gives a reading and conducts a workshop or roundtable with students, thanks to funding by a generous anonymous donor. Distinguished authors have included W.S. Merwin, Marilynne Robinson, John Edgar Wideman, Ana Castillo, Adrienne Rich, Edward P. Jones and Mark Doty.

Writers@Grinnell

Writers@Grinnell, the English department’s reading series, brings to campus writers of all kinds: poets, novelists, memoirists, essayists, radio essayists, columnists, graphic memoirists, playwrights, and short story writers. Believing language to be a dynamic and communal medium, we give its crafted versions the attention they deserve, and we take seriously the importance of diverse perspectives. Recent visitors include African-American and Latino writers, international writers, LGBT writers, blind and deaf writers, bi-polar writers, and writers with mobility impairments.  Through the generous support of an anonymous donor, every year we host a distinguished author reading and an interdisciplinary creative writing event. The program is directed by Ralph Savarese, Professor of English.

Fall Schedule of Events

All events are free and open to the public.

Kazim Ali

Roundtable: 4:15 p.m., Sept. 4, Rosenfield Center 209
Reading: 8 p.m., Sept. 4, Rosenfield Center Room 101

Tom Rayfiel

Roundtable: 4:15 p.m., Sept. 18, Rosenfield Center 209
Reading: 8 p.m., Sept. 18, Rosenfield Center Room 101

Michael Robins

Roundtable: 4:15 p.m., Nov. 6, Rosenfield Center 209
Reading: 8 p.m., Nov. 6, Rosenfield Center Room 101

The Grinnell Review

Reading: 8 p.m., Dec. 11, Rosenfield Center Room 101

The Grinnell Review is the College's mainstream journal of art and literature, published each semester.

Spring Schedule of Events

All events are free and open to the public.

Nami Mun

Roundtable: 4:15 p.m., Feb. 19, Rosenfield Center 209
Reading: 8 p.m., Feb. 19, Rosenfield Center Room 101

Brian Turner

Roundtable: 4:15 p.m., Mar. 12 Rosenfield Center 209
Reading: 8 p.m., Mar. 12, Rosenfield Center Room 101

Alison Bechdel

Lecture 12:00 p.m., Apr. 8, Rosenfield Center Room 101

Roundtable: 4:15 p.m., Apr. 8, Rosenfield Center 209

Daphne Kalotay

Roundtable: 4:15 p.m., Apr. 16, Rosenfield Center 209
Reading: 8 p.m., Apr. 16, Rosenfield Center Room 101

The Grinnell Review

Reading: 8 p.m., May 7, Rosenfield Center Room 101

The Grinnell Review is the College's mainstream journal of art and literature, published each semester.

SEPC

The Student Educational Policy Committee, or SEPC, is a student-faculty liaison group which provides faculty with student input on professors, candidates, curriculum, and other departmental issues. It also organizes social events within the department.