FALL 2015

HUM 185 - Film Analysis, Theory & Criticism

This writing-intensive course examines foundational concepts and methodologies in Cinema Studies, introducing students to a number of theoretical approaches central to the study of film, including semiotics, psychoanalysis, and Cultural Studies. Our focus is not film appreciation but rather the analysis of film as a language and “reading” film texts for their meanings.  Since film is a system of representation, the study of gender, sexuality, race and class will be crucial to our interpretive practice throughout. Prerequisite: One course in English, Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies, American Studies, Philosophy, or Art History. Instructor: DeLassus.

AMS 245- Shaping American Identities in Moving Images

This course explores representations of American identities and the binaries generated by these explorations including here/there, foreign/local, abroad/ home, American/Other. Films and readings will highlight the theme of amalgamation as an alchemic process (the melting pot) shaping Americanness and its association with characteristics such as respectability, recognition and respect. Prerequisite: one 100-level course in Humanities or Social Studies. Instructor: Gibel Mevorach.

HUM 295/ SST 295-ST  Race, Cinema, and the National Imaginary

This course examines how race has been constructed through the medium of film and cinema's myth making abilities for over a century, from Birth of a Nation (1915) to Selma (2014). Students will learn close, textual analysis of films and gain the ability to argue the ideological function of cinema in American race politics. Prerequisite: none. Instructor: Arora.

FRN 330- Innovation/Transgression 1870-1945

Conducted in French. Explores the evolution of literature and the rise of cinema between 1870 and 1945; examines notions such as moral and aesthetic transgression and innovation. Topics to be studied may include: collage, montage, memory, war, autobiography, and sexuality in authors and filmmakers such as Rimbaud, Rachilde, Colette, Melies, Jarry, Proust, Gide, Celine, and Cocteau. Prerequisite: French 312 or 313. Instructor: Moisan.

HIS-336-01- The European Metropolis        

This seminar examines the blossoming of new urban spaces in Europe from roughly 1850-1930, spaces characterized by unprecedented population density and diversity, radical shifts in infrastructure and communication, and vertiginous social and cultural developments. Using London, Paris, Vienna, and Berlin as case studies, we examine political developments, social theory, the visual arts, film, literature, architecture, consumer culture, and music. Concentrating in particular upon the ways that artists and intellectuals grappled with the idea and the experience of the metropolis, we consider such themes as community and alienation, the fluidity of the self, spectacle and entertainment, disease and criminality, and gender and class. Prerequisite: Any 100-level history course and any 200-level European history course including British or Russian history. Instructor: Maynard

SPRING 2016

HUM 185 - Film Analysis, Theory & Criticism

This writing-intensive course examines foundational concepts and methodologies in Cinema Studies, introducing students to a number of theoretical approaches central to the study of film, including semiotics, psychoanalysis, and Cultural Studies. Our focus is not film appreciation but rather the analysis of film as a language and “reading” film texts for their meanings.  Since film is a system of representation, the study of gender, sexuality, race and class will be crucial to our interpretive practice throughout. Prerequisite: One course in English, Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies, American Studies, Philosophy, or Art History. Instructor: DeLassus

FRN 305 – Contemporary Francophone Culture

Conducted in French. Overview of contemporary France and the French-speaking world. Examines the relationship between national identity and the forces of geography, history, language, race, religion, and ethnicity. Topics include: colonization, decolonization, immigration, French-American relations, and societal values related to the family, gender, education, political organization, the state, and secularism. Uses historical, cultural, and literary texts and films. Prerequisite: French 222. Instructor: Caradec

FRN 350-01- Advanced Topics in Literature & Civilization        

Contemporary Ecologies: Environment in Literature and Film. Conducted in French. Conducted in French. Examines representations of the environment in French and francophone novels and films. Explores topics such as pollution, climate change, animals, waste, the notions of paysage and terroir, contrasts between natural and non-natural, rural and urban, local and global, the human and the non-human. Prerequisites: FRN 312 or 313. Instructor: Caradec

REL 228 – Gods of Bollywood

From the mystical Upanishads to the rain-drenched saris of Bollywood heroines, the sacred, the erotic and the spectacular have long been intertwined in South Asia. This course will explore themes of love, performance and identity in India both historically and by using Bollywood films as visual texts. We will examine religion's intimate connections to culture, gender and meaning in the modern world as we ask, "What is Indian about Indian Cinema?" Prerequisite: Second-year standing or one 100-level "Studying Religion" course. Instructor: T. Dobe.

SPN 385 – Studies in Contemporary Spanish Literature and Film

Conducted in Spanish. This course examines Spanish narrative and film from the 20th and 21st centuries to explore the development of a modern, global Spain. Topics discussed may include: Franco's dictatorship, the democratic transition, human rights and the place of cultural production in social movements for "historical memory." Prerequisite: Spanish-311, 312, 314, 315, or 317. Staff.

HUM 365 – Studies in Film Theory

An intensive examination of important film scholars, movements, and/or theoretical concepts in Film Studies. An advanced-level, variable-topic course that explores film theory and the wide range of critical theories informing film criticism. Possible topics include queer theory, feminist film criticism, aesthetics, theories of space and place, film historiography, postmodernism, psychoanalysis, deconstruction, performance, affect, political economy, genre, poststructuralism, globalization, critical race theory, etc. May be repeated when content changes. For current course content please search the online live schedule of courses. Prerequisite: third-year standing and Humanities 185. Instructor: DeLassus