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Wellness

Calendar Customer Code: 
WELLNESS_PROGRAMS

Total Health from the Ground Up

Daphne MillerDr. Daphne Miller, a family physician, writer, and associate professor of family medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, will discuss “Farmacology: Total Health from the Ground Up” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 10, in Joe Rosenfield '25 Center, Room 101.

She will also lead a roundtable discussion about health professions, alternative medicine, and diet at 4 p.m.  in Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, Room 152. Both events are free and open to the public.

Miller will use her latest book, Farmacology: What Innovative Family Farming Can Teach Us About Health and Healing, to frame her discussion of family farms. Her lecture will cover all the aspects of farming — from seed choice to soil management — that have a direct and powerful impact on health.

Bridging the traditional divide between agriculture and medicine, Miller will share lessons learned from inspiring farmers and biomedical researchers as she weaves their insights and discoveries, along with stories from her patients, into the narrative.

A practicing family physician, Miller is also a leading scholar on health ecology. Her writings in the field have been published in The Washington Post, The New York Times, Vogue, Orion Magazine, Yes! Magazine, Food and Wine, The Guardian, and Harvard Medical Magazine.

Miller has received numerous honors for her achievements in health ecology, including fellowships at the University of California San Francisco, funded by the National Institute of Health, and at the Berkeley Food Institute. She also serves on the boards of a number of non-profits, including Institute of the Golden Gate, Education Outside, Mandela Marketplace, and the Edible Schoolyard Foundation.

Sponsoring this event are the Grinnell College Office of the President; Center for Prairie Studies; Rosenfield Program in Public Affairs, International Relations, and Human Rights; Office of Community Enhancement and Engagement; Wellness Program; Chaplain’s Office; Student Environmental Committee; and the Student Government Association.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. Rosenfield Center has accessible parking in the lot to the east. Room 101 is equipped with an induction hearing loop system.  You can request accommodations from the event sponsor or Conference Operations and Events.

Global Public Health

Dr. Paul Farmer, physician, humanitarian and founding director of Partners in Health, will close the College's Global Public Health Symposium.

Farmer will participate in two events:

4 p.m. Question and Answer Session

7 p.m. “Global Public Health" Presentation (followed by book signing)

Both events take place in Harris Center Auditorium and  are free and open to the public.

Farmer, chair of the Department of Global Health and Social 

Medicine at Harvard Medical School, has written extensively about health, human rights and the consequences of social inequality. He also is the subject of a best-selling book by Tracey Kidder, "Mountains beyond Mountains," which details his work in Haiti.

Farmer's presentation wraps up the symposium. He will sign several books: "Reimagining Global Public Health," "To Repair the World" and "Mountains to Mountains."

Farmer's talk is co-sponsored by the John Chrystal Endowment for Distinguished Foreign Visitors.

The Symposium

Red and white globe with red and white stethescope

The symposium was designed to inform the campus community and the general public about some of the most important issues in global public health today from different standpoints: policy, medicine, international relations, personal health, etc.

"Health is a fundamental human right, but many global issues present challenges to public health and well-being," said Sarah Purcell, professor of history and director of the Rosenfield Program. "From Ebola to obesity, the Global Public Health symposium examines some of the most pressing issues in world health today."  

Grinnell's Rosenfield Program in Public Affairs, International Relations and Human Rights is sponsoring the symposium. Co-sponsors are President Raynard S. Kington, a physician and former deputy director of the National Institutes of Health; the Grinnell Wellness program; and the Henry R. Luce Program in Nations and the Global Environment.

 

Synchronizing Mind and Body

Wellness on Grinnell’s campus comes in as many forms as its students have passions, and they don’t have to be strictly athletic passions.

Synchronized swimming has been a fixture in Tea Cakarmis ’17’s life since her childhood, and it wasn’t something she could leave behind her when she came to Grinnell. After arriving on campus, she formed the Grinnell Synchronized Swimming Club to keep synchro in her life and make it possible for other students — regardless of skill level, body type, or experience — to fall in love with it as she has.

Bringing Synchro to Grinnell

I envisioned the Grinnell Synchronized Swimming Club as a community, one that encourages both artistic expression and the development of athletic abilities.

At the age of 13, I was selected as a swimmer of the Serbian National Synchronized Swimming Team. I was both petrified and extremely honored. The five years I spent on the team before coming to Grinnell have been the most meaningful of my life. My teammates became my sisters as we shared countless hours of training, frustrations at being away from home, and pride in our accomplishments.

Swimmer performing move in a pool is mirrored by the pool's surface above.While competing internationally, we traveled together from Jerusalem to Geneva, we made countless friends and memories, and we spread our love for a unique sport that unifies ballet, gymnastics, swimming, and theatre. We performed routines requiring physical abilities equal to those of any other professional athletes — endurance, core strength, and flexibility. And we executed our routines gracefully, in sync, and while smiling — even underwater, we smiled. Although we were all too aware of the fact that our sport enjoyed little recognition in our country, we knew the value of what we were doing; we were our country’s ambassadors, painting the accurate picture of our people and our culture through our talent.

Through it all, the competitions and the pressure, synchro always remained my safe space. And it’s because it is such a beautiful mixture of all different athletic and artistic disciplines that it allows the performer to communicate any type of emotion or state of mind. It gives the performer an ability to enact their own reality or create a completely new one in the water. Because it is so subjective and open to interpretation, I believe that it is enhanced by the diversity of its performers.

Synchronized swimming is traditionally viewed as a sport that strictly prescribes the body type of the performer and thus excludes a lot of possible perspectives on the discipline. Although this remains somewhat true even today, the sport in general is becoming more accepting. I formed the Grinnell Synchro Club in that spirit. I wanted all of my club members to establish their own unique approaches to synchro.

Forming the Grinnell Synchro Club offered me yet another opportunity to be an ambassador, to represent the sport I love and my home country. It is a club that, to my surprise and excitement, has been growing during the past year. During my year abroad it will be led by two inspirational swimmers — Zala Tomasic ’18 and Tess Fisher ’18 — and it will be accepting all new members, with any level of experience.

Author Teodora Cakarmis ’17 is a French and political science double major from Belgrade, Serbia; Tess Fisher ’18 is an undeclared major from Oak Park, Ill.; and Zala Tomasic ’18 is an undeclared major from Skofja Loka, Slovenia.

Liberal Arts and an Embodied Life

Jonathan Miller-LaneJonathan Miller-Lane’s teaching and writing center on a single question: How do we draw from the best traditions of a liberal arts education while responding creatively and compassionately to the realities and challenges of contemporary society in the USA?  

Miller-Lane will present “A Liberal Arts Education and the Making of an Embodied Life” at 8 p.m. Monday, April 27, 2015, in Joe Rosenfield ’25 Center, Room 101. The event is free and open to the public.

The philosopher John Dewey argued that, “Freedom is not the absence of an external limit of control, but rather the presence of an internal locus of control.” If that’s true Miller-Lane asks, “In a society that places such a high value on ‘productivity’ and that seems increasingly obsessed with measuring academic achievement using ‘objective’ measures, what possible role might a liberal arts education still play? How might an embodied approach, that is, an approach that takes seriously the possibility that our bodies are sites of knowing, inform our understanding of the meaning and purpose of a liberal arts education?”  

His talk, he says, “will explore these questions, offer some initial responses, and invite discussion.”

While here, Miller-Lane joins theatre professor Celeste Miller, developer of Curriculum in Motion, to present a College-only workshop to experiment with embodied learning methods.

About the Speaker

Jonathan Miller-Lane is associate professor and director of the Education Studies Program at Middlebury College, Middlebury Vermont.

His is the author of "Toward an Embodied Liberal Arts" and the faculty head of a residential commons, where he helps foster deeper connections between academic and residential life. 

He addresses questions such as:

  • Is ‘disinterested learning’ still ethical in a post Ferguson world?
  • Which cherished ideals should we keep and which should we allow to rest in peace? 
  • How should we choose? 

Miller-Lane holds the rank of Sandan in the Japanse martial art of Aikido and founded Blue Heron Aikido of Middlebury in 2004.  The philosophy of Aikido informs many aspects of his work.

Miller-Lane’s visit is a collaboration of athletics and recreation and theatre and dance, and is supported by a Midwest Conference athletics integration grant.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. Rosenfield Center has accessible parking in the lot to the east. Room 101 is equipped with an induction hearing loop system. You can request accommodations from the event sponsor or Conference Operations.

The Making of an Embodied Life

Jonathan Miller-LaneJonathan Miller-Lane will present a free public talk, "A Liberal Arts Education and the Making of an Embodied Life," at 8 p.m. Monday, April 27, in Rosenfield Center, Room 101.

The philosopher John Dewey argued that, “Freedom is not the absence of an external limit of control, but rather the presence of an internal locus of control.”

Jonathan Miller-Lane asks “In a society that places such a high value on ‘productivity’and that seems increasingly obsessed with measuring academic achievement using ‘objective’ measures, what possible role might a liberal arts education still play? How might an embodied approach, that is, an approach that takes seriously the possibility that our bodies are sites of knowing, inform our understanding of the meaning and purpose of a liberal arts education?”

In his talk, Miller-Lane will explore these questions, offer some initial responses, and invite discussion.

The departments of athletics and recreation and theatre and dance collaborated on this event, which is supported by a Midwest Conference athletics integration grant.

About Jonathan Miller-Lane

Jonathan Miller-Lane is associate professor and director of the Education Studies Program at Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont. He is also the faculty head of a residential commons, working with colleagues and the student residential life staff to help foster deeper connections between academic and residential life.

His teaching and writing center on a single question: How do we draw from the best traditions of a liberal arts education while responding creatively and compassionately to the realities and challenges of contemporary society in the USA? 

For example, is ‘disinterested learning’ still ethical in a post-Ferguson world? Which cherished ideals should we keep and which should we allow to rest in peace? How should we choose?

Miller-Lane holds the rank of Sandan in the Japanese martial art of Aikido and founded Blue Heron Aikido of Middlebury in 2004. The philosophy of Aikido informs many aspects of his work.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. You can request accommodations from the event sponsors or Conference Operations.

 

Exercise to improve sleep

Poster: Exercise improves sleep

Need a reminder of this tip? Print the poster.

Tip of the week:

More than half of people surveyed found that their sleep quality improved on days that they exercised.

It can strengthen circadian rhythms, which promote daytime alertness and bring on sleepiness at night.

Exercise has been shown to improve sleep for people with insomnia.

For more tips on sleeping well, see: The Sleep Foundation and Psychology Today

#GrinWell — Take the challenge. Track your daily progress.

 

Eat more fruits and vegetables

Poster: Many health benefits of fruits and vegetables

Need a reminder of this tip? Print the poster.

Tip of the week:

A diet rich in vegetables and fruits can:

  • lower blood pressure,
  • reduce risk of heart disease and stroke,
  • prevent some types of cancer,
  • lower risk of eye and digestive problems, and
  • have a positive effect upon blood sugar which can help keep appetite in check.

For more ideas on healthier living, see: The Harvard School of Public Health

#GrinWell — Take the challenge. Track your daily progress.

 

#GrinWell Begins

Grinnellians ask a lot of themselves. To do our best, we have to be at our best.

President Raynard S. Kington is challenging Grinnellians to get healthier, happier, and more productive by joining him in a new wellness program.

The President’s Wellness Challenge is a 12-week event for students, staff, and faculty. It’s easy to sign up. And President Kington will also be participating in the challenge and posting his progress to help motivate our campus community. 

The challenge encourages intentional wellness in four areas:

  • SLEEP a solid 7-9 hours.
  • EAT the recommended 5 servings of fruits and vegetables.
  • MOVE your body for at least 30 minutes.
  • RECHARGE yourself through meditation, religious participation, a bike ride, baking — anything that gets you outside your routine and restores your sense of balance.

Each person taking part in the challenge will define their own goals for building good habits in these areas (i.e., how many days each week they want to do address each area). The College will make a donation to a local wellness charity on behalf of each participant who completes the challenge.

Although this is not a comprehensive definition of wellness, it can help students, faculty, and staff lay the groundwork for a healthier lifestyle. For tips, strategies, and presidential updates, check out the wellness events on the calendar and like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter. Watch the Campus Memo for more information and the newest issues of the LiveWellGrinnell newsletter.

The challenge runs for 12 weeks beginning Monday, September 29 through Friday, December 18.