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  Doug Caulkins, emeritus professor of anthropology, is leading a multiyear study of regeneration of Derry-Londonderry, Northern Ireland. Anya Vanecek ’15 and Mackenzie Shanahan ’14 are anthropology majors supported with summer funding from Grinnell’s Mentored Advance Project...
In 1993, a tomb in Hubei Province, China, produced a trove of ancient texts as significant as the Dead Sea scrolls. The collection of Confucian and Daoist texts from around 300 B.C. is shedding new light on ancient Chinese philosophy, which is why Scott Cook, professor of...
"When you get something right in lab, it's like making a birdie or getting a one-putt," says Stephanie Spahr '14. She joins her mentor, chemistry professor Stephen Sieck, to share stories about "failed" experiments, organic chemistry, and finding success in the top programs in...
Tyler Roberts, professor of religious studies, has just published Encountering Religion: Responsibility and Criticism After Secularism, with Columbia University Press. The book explores the state of the field of religious studies to argue that scholars of religion need to...
  Maddie Cloud ’14 and Eric Streed ’14 spent the summer studying damselfly genes mentored by Jackie Brown, biology. They evaluated the role of isolation between islands as a barrier to gene flow in two multi-island species of Hawaiian damselflies. Their research included using a...
Karla Erickson will discuss her popular new book How We Die Now: Intimacy and the Work of Dying with a panel of students, faculty, and community members at 4:15 p.m. Thursday, April 17, in the Burling Library Lounge. This event is open to the public, and light refreshments will...
Karla Erickson, sociology, began work on her newest book — How We Die Now: Intimacy and the Work of Dying — after she observed the spiritual, physical, and emotional support hospice workers provided her dying grandparents. Erickson, a feminist ethnographer of labor, immerses...
Victoria Vertilo ’12 and psychology professor Janet Gibson have published a paper, “Influence of character strengths on mental-health stigma,” in the Journal of Positive Psychology. “The paper presents correlational and experimental data of individual differences measures on...
For ten weeks during the summer of 2013, Meg Rudy '14 and Isaiah Tyree '15 examined archival documents related to Professor Paul Lacson’s research on the Dakota peoples during the mid-nineteenth century. His work examines the history of the Dakota Indian diaspora out of...
When Isabella “Izzy” Sanchez Leo ’14 noticed an increase in racist and xenophobic outbursts in European soccer games, she developed the topic into a paper she will present Friday during Grinnell College’s Peace Studies Conference. “Soccer is the most popular sport in the world,...
  Students in Museum Studies (Art 260) will explore works in "From Wunderkammer to the Modern Museum, 1606-1884" as significant examples from a past age, and as precursors to museum practices as we know them today. Each student will be stationed by her display case and audience ...
As a post-baccalaureate fellow at the Data Analysis and Social Inquiry Lab (DASIL), Adam Lauretig ’13 is making it easier for others to visualize complex datasets. Lauretig was first introduced to the Polity IV project — run by the Center for Systemic Peace — in Danielle Lussier...
“Since its inception in 1990, Teach for America (TFA) has been a lighting rod for both praise and criticism,” says Deborah Michaels, education. “On the one hand, TFA places college graduates from top academic institutions into high-need schools in poor urban and rural...
Students are working as neuroscientists in Clark Lingren’s The Language of Neurons, an introduction to biology course. In 2000, Grinnell College turned the biology curriculum upside down, involving entry-level biology students in cutting-edge research and offering a unique,...
In 2007, while looking for a way to fill the summer, Toby Austin ’14, an anthropology major from Cedarburg, Wis., found Crow Canyon’s website and was attracted by what Crow Canyon had to offer — and he liked the idea of traveling to a different area of the country. He...
Methylmercury, a toxin that builds up in fish, has serious health consequences for humans. Elena Jaffer ’14 and Keaton Cameron-Burr ’15 spent the summer studying the production of this toxin in natural environments in a mentored advanced project with Andrew Graham, chemistry....
Under what circumstances do civil rights laws get enforced? Why do authorities seem to protect certain civil rights, while ignoring others? These are the big questions that Douglas Hess ’91, assistant professor of political science, seeks to answer in his research on the...

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