U.S. News and World Report quoted Charlie Curtsinger, assistant professor of computer science, in an article by Geoff Williams, "The End of Net Neutrality: What It Means for Your Internet, Cable and Phone Bill."

For some time now, in fact, proponents of net neutrality have been concerned that without regulations, ISPs could essentially split websites into "fast lanes" and "slow lanes." That could mean a lot of winners and losers across the internet.

And while presumably a big company with deep pockets would have no trouble paying to be in a fast lane, if you're a business owner with a streaming company that you're trying to turn into a global presence, you may not have a lot of extra money to fork over to the ISP.

"Allowing ISPs to manipulate this traffic to boost profits runs contrary to the way the internet has worked up until now – and bears more than a passing resemblance to a protection racket," says Charlie Curtsinger, assistant professor of computer science at Grinnell College in Grinnell, Iowa.