Associate Professor Kesho Scott presented on the history and power of women’s autobiographies at the Karachi Literature Festival on February 9-11.

Associate Professor of American Studies and Sociology at Grinnell College Kesho Scott began the session by speaking about the history of autobiographies. Women’s autobiographies emerged as a genre in the 1980s, she said, explaining to a pumped up audience that before that autobiographies were a medium of expression for privileged, wealthy and often white males. “[Women] are and always have been the subject of life – we make society,” she said. “I don’t get to leave my woman-ness at home, just like you can’t leave your Pakistani-ness at home,” she told the audience, all of whom hooted and hollered at her words. “Those with the most societal privilege aren’t the only ones who theorise, lead or inspire,” Scott chanted.

Read the Express Tribune article, "From history to her story," by Siham Basir.