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Arts and Culture

Joan Linder: Operation Sunshine

The Faulconer Gallery will open a new exhibition on January 27, 2017. In her exhibition, "Operation Sunshine," Joan Linder '92 investigates the environmental history of brownfields and toxic waste sites near Niagara Falls by making meticulous drawings of the empty fields, chain link fences and the files stored away in archives. She uses drawing to consider how history can get buried: as artifacts and chemicals in the ground, and as documents in the archive. The act of drawing becomes a way to slow down and pay attention anew to the damage that has become hidden in plain sight.

"Operation Sunshine" includes more than 80 drawings of actual sites and documents, which she recreates by hand to tell a story such as 1950s research about the impact of radioactive fallout. On March 7 and 8, visitors will have the opportunity to observe Linder's work-in-progress, "Toxic Archive," as she draws in the gallery (see below for details). "Operation Sunshine" is offered in conjunction with the college's Rosenfield Symposium on Technology and Human Rights, March 7-9.

Faulconer Gallery will host a series of free, public events related to the exhibition:

  • Artists@Grinnell, Thursday, Feb. 9, 4 p.m., with Haitian-born artist and curator Edouard Duval-Carrié, who incorporates religious traditions and the history of Haiti, the Caribbean and Florida, into his art with a wide range of images.
  • Community Day, Saturday, Feb. 25, 1:30 – 3 p.m. Participants of all ages are welcome to tour the exhibitions and enjoy a variety of hands-on activities and refreshments.
  • Concert: Piano by Royce Wolf, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 11 a.m. Wolf, associate professor of mathematics and statistics, will play selections by Mendelssohn, Rzweski, Ives and Mozart.
  • 20 Minutes@11, Wednesday, March 1, 11 a.m., with Liz Queathem, senior lecturer in biology, who will speak about a selected work from "Operation Sunshine," while considering the environmental impact of toxins in Iowa.
  • Artists@Grinnell Drawing in the Gallery, Tuesday, March 7, 12:30 – 4:30 p.m. and Wednesday, March 8, 10 a.m. – noon and 1 – 3 p.m. Visiting artist Joan Linder will work on her "Toxic Archive," drawings of documents related to toxic waste sites.

Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week and admission is free. The Faulconer Gallery is in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, 1108 Park St., Grinnell. For more information about the exhibitions and related programs, call 641-269-4660.

Grinnell College welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. Information on parking and accessibility is available on the college website. Accommodation requests may be made to Conference Operations at 641-269-3235 or calendar[at]grinnell[dot]edu.

The college also welcomes the presence of minors at all age-appropriate public events and for informal visits, with the understanding that a parent, legal guardian, or other responsible adult assumes full responsibility for their child's safety and behavior during such visits or events. In these cases the college expects that an adult responsible for the visiting child takes measures to ensure the child's safety and sees that the child complies with directions of college personnel. Grinnell College is not responsible for supervision of minors on campus.

Crossing the Line: Selections from the Grinnell College Art Collection

The Faulconer Gallery will open a new exhibition at the start of second semester. "Crossing the Line" features more than 50 works from the college's art collection — prints, paintings, drawings, maps, books, photographs and objets d'art, which connect to current issues of global discourse and reveal lines crossed and repercussions dealt.

"This exhibition is intended to bring up current global issues that are identified by works in the collection," Daniel Strong, associate director of Faulconer Gallery and curator of exhibitions, explains. "'Crossing the Line' is widely varied in media and visually very stimulating, illustrating issues such as migration and immigration, incarceration and revolution, and how these issues reshape identities.

"These are issues in the news, and the collection relates to them. The art collection is here to be instructive and to make people think, not just look at or soothe, but to edify and question."

Grinnell College faculty, students and staff will write some of the texts that will accompany works in the exhibition, lending their expertise and personal experience to an understanding of the art. They will be on hand for an open conversation event on Thursday, Feb. 23, to interact with the the public offering information and points of view about each work.

Director of Faulconer Gallery Lesley Wright says many of the works in "Crossing the Line" are recent acquisitions, some as recent as December, purchased from the college's endowed funds.

"The Grinnell College Art Collection houses historically and culturally rich works of social and political commentary from many periods and media," she adds. "The collection in general deals with social issues, and we can build different exhibitions in different contexts. 'Crossing the Line,' for example, is offered in conjunction with 'Rethinking Global Cultures,' a yearlong project sponsored by the college's Center for the Humanities."

Faulconer Gallery will host a series of free, public events related to the exhibition:

  • 20 Minutes@11, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 11 a.m., with Daniel Strong, associate director and curator of exhibitions. He will speak about Damon Davis' "All Hands on Deck," a work included in "Crossing the Line" that was created during the Ferguson, Mo., protests following the death of Michael Brown.
  • Artists@Grinnell, Thursday, Feb. 9, 4 p.m., with Haitian-born artist and curator Edouard Duval-Carrié, who incorporates religious traditions and the history of Haiti, the Caribbean and Florida, into his art with a wide range of images.
  • Panel: "Crossing the Line" and Identity, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 4 p.m., with faculty panelists who will explore, through professional and personal experience, how crossing a line can reshape an identity or create multiple identities. Moderated by Caleb Elfenbein, associate professor of history and religious studies; director, Center for the Humanities.
  • "Crossing the Line:" An Open Conversation, Thursday, Feb. 23, 4 p.m., with selected faculty, staff and students stationed by a work of art of their choice. The audience will move among them for conversations from both personal and professional points of view.
  • Community Day, Saturday, Feb. 25, 1:30 – 3 p.m. Participants of all ages are welcome to tour the exhibitions and enjoy a variety of hands-on activities and refreshments.
  • Concert: Piano by Royce Wolf, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 11 a.m. Wolf, associate professor of mathematics and statistics, will play selections by Mendelssohn, Rzweski, Ives and Mozart.

Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week and admission is free. The Faulconer Gallery is in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, 1108 Park St., Grinnell. For more information about the exhibitions and related programs, call 641-269-4660.

Grinnell College welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. Information on parking and accessibility is available on the college website. Accommodation requests may be made to Conference Operations at 641-269-3235 or calendar[at]grinnell[dot]edu.

The college also welcomes the presence of minors at all age-appropriate public events and for informal visits, with the understanding that a parent, legal guardian, or other responsible adult assumes full responsibility for their child's safety and behavior during such visits or events. In these cases the college expects that an adult responsible for the visiting child takes measures to ensure the child's safety and sees that the child complies with directions of college personnel. Grinnell College is not responsible for supervision of minors on campus.
 

Verdi's 'Nabucco' Live in HD

Grinnell College will stream Verdi's Nabucco at noon on Saturday, Jan. 7, 2017, as part of the "Metropolitan Live in HD" movie theatre transmissions program.

Nabucco will be shown in the Harris Center Cinema, 1114 10th Ave. Don Smith, professor emeritus of history, will present the opera talk at 11:30 a.m.

This opera is set in Jerusalem, in sixth century B.C., as the Israelites pray for help against their oppressor Nabucco, the King of Babylon. The story follows Fenena, the heroic daughter of Nabucco who works to free the Israelites, and her half-sister Abigaille, a warrior woman determined to rule empires. 

James Levine conducts, and Liudmyla Monastyrska and Jamie Barton star as Abigaille and Fenena, respectively. 

Nabucco is the fourth in a series of 10 operas to be broadcast this season at the Harris Center. All performances begin at noon, unless otherwise noted. Opera talks start a half-hour before the broadcast.

The remaining operas this season are:

  • Jan. 21: Gounod's Romeo et Juliette with an opera talk by Kelly Maynard, associate professor of history.
  • Feb. 25: Dvorak's Rusalka with an opera talk by Jennifer Brown, associate professor of music.
  • March 11: Verdi's La Traviata with an opera talk by Jennifer Brown, associate professor of music.
  • March 25: Mozart's Idomeneo. There will be no opera talk before this performance.
  • April 22: Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin with an opera talk by Kelly Herold, associate professor of Russian.
  • May 13, 11:30 a.m.: Strauss' Der Rosenkavalier. There will be no opera talk before this performance.

Refreshments will be available for sale in the lobby of the cinema before each opera and during intermission.

Tickets are available at the Pioneer Bookshop and at the door on the day of the show. Tickets are $15 for adults and $10 for students, children, and Met Opera members.

The Office of the President has generously funded tickets for Grinnell College faculty, staff, and students, and tickets are available for free at all locations. Family members not employed by the College are required to purchase tickets.

Grinnell College welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. Harris Cinema is equipped with an induction hearing loop system, which enables individuals with hearing aids set to T-Coil to hear the program. Accommodation requests may be made to Conference Operations and events.

The College also welcomes the presence of minors at all age-appropriate public events and for informal visits, with the understanding that a parent, legal guardian, or other responsible adult assumes full responsibility for their child’s safety and behavior during such visits or events. In these cases the College expects that an adult responsible for the visiting child takes measures to ensure the child’s safety and sees that the child complies with directions of College personnel. Grinnell College is not responsible for supervision of minors on campus.

L'Amour de Loin, Live in HD

Grinnell College will stream L'amour de Loin by Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho at noon on Saturday, Dec. 10, in the Harris Center Cinema. The opera is part of the Metropolitan Live in HD movie theatre transmissions program.

Gene Gaub, associate professor of music, will deliver the opera talk at 11:30 a.m.

The Salzburg Festival commissioned this opera, which was first performed in 2000. L'Amour de Loin is set at sea during the 12th century. Eric Owens is the knight on a quest of love and Susanna Phillips is his lover on the other side of the sea. Conductor Susanna Mälkki makes her Met debut.

The tragic love story is making its Met premiere this year, after being first seen in 2000 at the Salzburg Festival, which commissioned the opera.

The New York Times described Saariaho's breakthrough opera as "transfixing…a lushly beautiful score." The Met's production by Robert Lepage features glimmering ribbons of LED lights that extend across the length of the stage and over the orchestra pit.

Refreshments will be available for sale in the lobby of the cinema before the opera and during intermission.

Tickets are available at the Pioneer Bookshop and at the door on the day of the show. Tickets are $15 for adults and $10 for students, children, and Met Opera members.

The Office of the President has generously funded tickets for Grinnell College faculty, staff, and students, and tickets are available for free at all locations. Family members not employed by the College are required to purchase tickets.

Grinnell College welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. Accommodation requests may be made to Conference Operations, 641-269-3235.

The College welcomes the presence of minors at all age-appropriate public events and for informal visits, with the understanding that a parent, legal guardian, or other responsible adult assumes full responsibility for their child’s safety and behavior during such visits or events. In these cases the College expects that an adult responsible for the visiting child takes measures to ensure the child’s safety and sees that the child complies with directions of the College.

Images: Piano Music of Claude Debussy

Grinnell College will host “Images: Piano Music of Claude Debussy,” at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 7, in the Faulconer Gallery in conjunction with the "Archipenko: A Modern Legacy" exhibition, which runs through Dec. 11.

The performance, which will feature Associate Professor of Music Eugene Gaub, is free and open to the public. It will take place in the Faulconer Gallery in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts.

Gaub, a pianist who also teaches courses in music history and music theory, joined the faculty in 1995. As a pianist, his solo repertoire comprises works by composers ranging from Bach and Scarlatti to György Ligeti and John Adams. He made his New York City debut with the Juilliard Orchestra at Lincoln Center, and has played with orchestras in Vienna and Salzburg, Austria. He also has given solo recitals in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Chicago, among others.

Although French composer Debussy and sculptor Archipenko apparently never met, they both lived in Paris during the years 1908-18, each taking part in the modernist revolution.

Debussy, an innovator who embraced nontraditional scales and tonal structures, is considered the founder of musical impressionism and one of the most highly regarded composers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

The traveling exhibition highlights Archipenko’s vision as an innovator with the human, and especially the female, figure, abstracting and altering the forms and using modern materials in unexpected ways. “Archipenko: A Modern Legacy” includes works from major museum and private collections as well as never-before exhibited examples from Archipenko's archives.

International Arts and Artists in Washington, D.C., a nonprofit arts service organization dedicated to increasing cross-cultural understanding and exposure to the arts internationally, organized the exhibition in collaboration with the Archipenko Foundation.

Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week, and admission is free. The Archipenko exhibition concludes on Sunday, Dec. 11.

Grinnell College welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. You can request accommodations from Conference Operations and Events.

Important: The College welcomes the presence of minors at all age-appropriate public events and for informal visits, with the understanding that a parent, legal guardian, or other responsible adult assumes full responsibility for their child’s safety and behavior during such visits or events. In these cases the College expects that an adult responsible for the visiting child takes measures to ensure the child’s safety and sees that the child complies with directions of College personnel. Grinnell College is not responsible for supervision of minors on campus.

'Hallelujah' Chorus Sing/Play-Along

Grinnell College will celebrate the last day of classes of the fall semester with the 12th annual sing/play-along performance of the popular "Hallelujah" chorus from Handel’s Messiah.

Local singers and instrumentalists are invited to join students, faculty and staff in the informal performance starting at noon on Friday, Dec. 9, in the rotunda of the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, 1108 Park St., Grinnell. The event, which is expected to last about 15 minutes, is free and open to the public.

Blanche Johnson Professor of Music John Rommereim will direct the singers and instrumentalists. Music will be provided for all participants, along with chairs and music stands.

All instruments are welcome. Anyone who wishes to play is asked to email Jennifer Brown in advance to find a part that works for his or her particular instrument.

Grinnell College welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. Accommodation requests may be made to Conference Operations.

The College also welcomes the presence of minors at all age-appropriate public events and for informal visits, with the understanding that a parent, legal guardian, or other responsible adult assumes full responsibility for their child’s safety and behavior during such visits or events. In these cases the College expects that an adult responsible for the visiting child takes measures to ensure the child’s safety and sees that the child complies with directions of college personnel. Grinnell College is not responsible for supervision of minors on campus.

‘Take It Easy’ with the Jazz Ensemble

The College's Jazz Ensemble, directed by Assistant Professor of Music Mark Laver, offers a chance to "Take It Easy' during the hectic holiday season.

The ensemble's "Take It Easy" concert, which is free and open to the public, will start at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 1, in Sebring-Lewis Hall, Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, 1108 Park St., Grinnell.

Members of the jazz ensemble work together to develop their program for each concert. Instrumentalists contribute song ideas and they all work on arrangements together in rehearsal. Their program for “Take it Easy” includes their own arrangements of:

  • “Feel Like Funkin’ It Up” by Rebirth Brass Band
  • “Goodbye Pork Pie Hat” by Charles Mingus (lyric by Joni Mitchell)
  • “Take It Easy My Brother Charles” by Jorge Ben Jor
  • “Is It a Crime” by Sade
  • “Freedom” by Rebirth Brass Band

The ensemble is made up of instrumentalists of all class years who are interested in the study and performance of jazz. The group, which performs twice a semester, plays music from a wide variety of jazz-related styles, and frequently performs works by both veteran and contemporary jazz composers. While the ensemble focuses primarily on traditional jazz ensemble literature, the group occasionally embarks upon large-scale musical performances of a nontraditional nature.

Grinnell College welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. You can request accommodations from Conference Operations and Events.

The College welcomes the presence of minors at all age-appropriate public events and for informal visits, with the understanding that a parent, legal guardian, or other responsible adult assumes full responsibility for their child’s safety and behavior during such visits or events. In these cases the College expects that an adult responsible for the visiting child takes measures to ensure the child’s safety and sees that the child complies with directions of College personnel. Grinnell College is not responsible for supervision of minors on campus.

Handel's Messiah with the Grinnell Oratorio Society and the Grinnell Singers

The Grinnell Oratorio Society, together with the Grinnell Singers, will present Handel’s Messiah on December 4, at 2 p.m. in Herrick Chapel under the direction of John Rommereim, Blanche Johnson Professor of Music.

The choir of 100 voices will include members of the Grinnell community as well as singers from nearby Newton and students, faculty, and staff of the College.

The orchestra will consist of players from various professional orchestras across the state. The soloists are drawn from the music faculty of Iowa’s universities:

  • Rachel Joselson, an associate professor of music at the University of Iowa, and an opera singer and recitalist who has performed across Europe, will sing the soprano solos.
  • The alto soloist will be Katherine Osborne, a faculty member at the University of Northern Iowa, and a versatile performer of operatic roles and concert works from the Baroque era to the 21st century.
  • Jeffrey Brich, a sought-after soloist with orchestras and opera houses, also from UNI, will sing the tenor solos.
  • Nicholas Miguel, who has developed a thriving voice studio at Grinnell College, and who the Grinnell audience will remember for his admirable performance in Handel’s Esther with the Lyra Baroque Orchestra and the Grinnell Singers in 2015, will sing the bass solos.

The concert will include the first part of Handel’s masterpiece (which climaxes with the “Hallelujah” chorus) in its entirety. Portions of parts two and three will also be performed, and the concert will conclude with the elaborate “Amen” that serves as such a resplendent finale to this beloved work.​

Grinnell College welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. You can request accommodations from Conference Operations and Events.

Important: The College welcomes the presence of minors at all age-appropriate public events and for informal visits, with the understanding that a parent, legal guardian, or other responsible adult assumes full responsibility for their child’s safety and behavior during such visits or events. In these cases the College expects that an adult responsible for the visiting child takes measures to ensure the child’s safety and sees that the child complies with directions of College personnel. Grinnell College is not responsible for supervision of minors on campus.

Artist and Adventurer Nina Elder Comes to Campus

Faulconer Gallery will host artist and adventurer Nina Elder for a week-long residency, which includes a narrative presentation of her work, “Nonlinear Creative Research: From Piles of Rocks to Polar Bears,“ made possible through the gallery's Artists@Grinnell program.

The presentation is scheduled for 4 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 15, in the Faulconer Gallery, Bucksbaum Center for the Arts. The event is free and open to the public.

Elder travels to some of the most environmentally impacted, geographically distant, and economically important places on the globe. She explored Alaska and the Western Arctic, researching how the natural environment is changing through human-centered activities, gathering more stories, images, ideas and correlations than can be translated into traditional two-dimensional art work.

The result is an evolving narrative presentation that art critic and author Lucy Lippard called "Something that embodies a social energy not yet defined as art."

The presentation is equal parts travelogue, artist talk, poetic narrative and a scrutiny of assumptions about the North. It weaves together unlikely associations between piles of rocks, Elder's father's untold military history, climate change, Native cultures, obsolete communication technology and the need for curiosity.

Great Voices Singing H. T. Burleigh

Randye Jones​Soprano, researcher, and Grinnell College Library staff member, Randye Jones will present, "Great Voices Singing H. T. Burleigh," sharing a century of recordings of Negro Spirituals by some of the world's greatest vocalists on the 150th anniversary of the composer's birth.  The free, public event begins at 4:15 p.m. Thursday Dec. 1, 2016, in the Burling Library Lounge.

The program draws from the music collection at Grinnell College's Burling Library and from Jones' private collection of rare recordings. Singers represented include:

  • Burleigh, 
  • Nellie Melba, 
  • Marian Anderson, 
  • Paul Robeson,
  • Ezio Pinza,
  • Martina Arroyo,
  • Sherrill Milnes, and
  • Barbara Hendricks.

"Since Burleigh published 'Deep River,' the first Negro Spiritual set for solo voice and piano, in 1916, his settings have become standard repertoire for untold numbers of developing and professional singers," Jones says. "The composer used some of the most powerful folk music ever produced. Combined with the performances by these wondrous singers, the music created can not help but move the souls of most of its listeners."

Jones, media collections coordinator, earned her bachelor's in music education from Bennett College, and her master's from Florida State University. She is currently a doctoral student in vocal literature at the University of Iowa.

She has gained recognition for her research of and published writings on African-American vocalists and composers, in addition to being a performer and lecturer herself. Frequently presenting lecture-recitals, Jones has been a panelist for events such as the Research, Education, and Activism and Performance National Conference on Spirituals, and the National Association of Negro Musicians conference.

The program is free and open to the public. For more information, contact 641-821-0188.

Grinnell College welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. You can request accommodations from Conference Operations and Events.

Important: The College welcomes the presence of minors at all age-appropriate public events and for informal visits, with the understanding that a parent, legal guardian, or other responsible adult assumes full responsibility for their child’s safety and behavior during such visits or events. In these cases the College expects that an adult responsible for the visiting child takes measures to ensure the child’s safety and sees that the child complies with directions of College personnel. Grinnell College is not responsible for supervision of minors on campus.