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Lavender Country Concert

Patrick Haggerty, founding member of first openly gay country music group, Lavender Country, will perform with his band at Grinnell College on Saturday, Sept. 30, 2017.

The concert is free and open to the public. It will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Herrick Chapel, 1128 Park St., Grinnell. No tickets are required.

AJ Lewis, former Grinnell College visiting professor of gender, women's and sexuality studies, will open the show with a banjo act with Lavender Country.

Grinnell College Public Events is sponsoring the concert, which is co-sponsored by Student Government Association Concerts.

In 1973, Haggerty formed the first openly gay country band. The group, called Lavender Country, released 1,000 bootleg copies of its self-titled and community-funded album. They played LGBTQ benefits and festivals for a few years and then disbanded with little fanfare.

In 1999, Lavender Country's album was archived at the Country Music Hall of Fame. In 2014, a still-unknown user uploaded one of Lavender Country's songs to YouTube. Up-and-coming record label, Paradise of Bachelors, rereleased the album to enthusiastic reception.

Since then, Lavender Country is bigger than ever. The band has recently been the subject of award-winning documentaries and there is talk of a feature-length movie in the works.

Head Hunters: The Music of Herbie Hancock

Cover of Herbie Hancock's Head Hunters albumThe Grinnell College Jazz Ensemble will perform “Head Hunters: The Music of Herbie Hancock” [’60] on Friday, Sept. 22, 2017.

The free, public concert will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Herrick Chapel, 1128 Park St., Grinnell.

Hancock is a renowned jazz composer, musician, bandleader, record producer, arranger, and actor.

The ensemble will pay tribute to Hancock by performing the music from one of his most seminal albums, Head Hunters. Recorded in 1973, Head Hunters had an enormous impact on the trajectory of jazz. Following on his earlier work with the Miles Davis electric bands of the late 1960s and early 1970s, Hancock incorporated sounds drawn from funk, rock, and soul music, creating a package that was equal parts experimental and groovy. 

Hancock, one of the most influential and prolific innovators in the history of jazz, has been on the creative cutting edge of American music for five decades. His omnivorous musical imagination has taken him from his longstanding collaborations with Miles Davis and Wayne Shorter to working with songwriters such as Joni Mitchell and Stevie Wonder, and to performing and recording with contemporary artists like Christina Aguilera and Kanye West.

Directed by Mark Laver, assistant professor of music, the Grinnell Jazz Ensemble performs music from a wide variety of jazz-related styles and frequently performs works by both veteran and contemporary jazz composers. While the ensemble focuses primarily on traditional jazz ensemble literature, the group occasionally embarks upon large-scale musical performances of a nontraditional nature.

Past concerts have included pieces by composers such as Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Toshiko Akiyoshi, Sammy Nestico, Charles Mingus, Maria Schneider, Gordon Goodwin, Thad Jones, and Oliver Nelson.

Make/Shift Open Studio at Stew Art Studios

Student exhibitions, artist talks, and public workshops will be held at Stew Art Studios on Broad Street as part of a new year-long collaboration between the Grinnell College Studio Art Department and the Grinnell Area Arts Council.

Make/Shift open studio is a continuing effort by the Studio Art Department to engage with the Grinnell community. A variety of Make/Shift events will take place throughout the year. This fall's events will be held on most Thursday evenings, and will focus on collage, drawing, and zine-making.

Make/Shift is scheduled from 7-9 p.m. on the following dates at the Stew Art Studios space at 927 Broad Street, Grinnell, IA:

  • Thursday, Sept. 21 and 28
  • Thursday, Oct. 5 and 19
  • Thursday, Nov. 2, 9, 16, and 30
  • Thursday, Dec. 7 and 14

These drop-in evenings are free and open to anyone in the community.

All ages and skill levels are encouraged to attend and all materials are provided. For more information about Make/Shift, contact Jeremy Chen, senior lecturer at Grinnell College, 641-269-4835.

For more information about the Stew Art Studios, contact the Grinnell Area Arts Council, 641-236-3203.

 

Many Visions, Many Versions: Art from Indigenous Communities in India

Grinnell College’s Faulconer Gallery will be the first stop on a North American museum tour ofMany Visions, Many Versions: Art from Indigenous Communities in India.

The exhibition opens Friday, Sept. 22, 2017, and features works from the Gond and Warli communities of central India, the Mithila region of Bihar, and the narrative scroll painters of West Bengal. Many Visions, Many Versions is organized by BINDU Modern Gallery, and is toured by International Arts & Artists (IA&A), Washington, D.C. The exhibition was curated by Drs. Aurogeeta Das and David Szanton with assistance from curating consultant Jeffrey Wechsler.

“India is increasingly a bigger and bigger player in the world’s geo-political scene,” said Faulconer Gallery Director Lesley Wright. “This travelling installation is a great opportunity to learn more about the cultural traditions of the sub-continent, while also contributing to Global Grinnell, the College’s mission of global education.” Grinnell enrolls a high number of students of South Asian heritage, including 46 from India.

Many Visions, Many Versions is on view through Dec. 10 and encompasses 47 paintings by 24 artists. One of the artists represented in the exhibition, painter and singer Swarna Chitrakar, will be in-residence Oct. 3–9 to offer public demonstrations of scroll painting from her native Patua artisan community.

The exhibition paintings — on paper, canvas, particle board, and fabric — are divided into four broad categories: myth and cosmology, nature, village life, and contemporary explorations. They demonstrate responsiveness to contemporary global concerns, as well as deeply rooted cultural traditions.

  • Gond tribal art includes mud wall and floor paintings portraying deities and symbols from nature.
  • Warli tribal art, which uses only red/brown and white pigments, depicts human relationships to deities and nature through use of triangular and hourglass-shaped figures.
  • Mithila regional art uses vivid pigments with cow dung and mud to illustrate global events.
  • And scrolls from the Patua artisan community refer to mythological and religious themes and socio-political issues.

As contemporary practitioners, the artists also use their traditions to address challenges such as HIV/AIDS, tsunamis, women’s rights, and pollution.

A number of Faulconer Gallery programs have been developed to support understanding of India’s art and culture, including:

Gallery Talk: Modernism to Indigenous Arts in Post-Independence India
Sept. 22, 4 p.m.
Umesh Gaur and Sunanda Gaur have one of the largest collections of modern and contemporary Indian art in the world, including the art in this exhibition.
The collectors will introduce artists in their collection and provide context for the rise of modernism at the time of Indian independence in 1947, and the subsequent recognition of modern indigenous traditions.
Opening Reception
Sept. 22, 5–6 p.m.
Refreshments will be served.
Museum Day Live!
Sept. 23, 11 a.m.–5 p.m.
Faulconer Gallery will participate in Smithsonian magazine’s national day of recognition for the role of cultural institutions to inspire creativity, inspire curiosity and pursue knowledge.
Yoga in the Gallery with Monica St. Angelo
Mondays and Thursdays, Sept. 25–Dec. 14, 12:15–12:50 p.m.
No yoga Oct. 16, Oct. 19, and Nov. 23.
Enjoy a free 30-minute yoga practice of warming and invigorating poses and a final period of relaxation.
All levels welcome. Mats provided. Co-sponsored by Live Well Grinnell.
20 Minutes @ 11 with Timothy Dobe
Sept. 26, 11 a.m.
Timothy Dobe, associate professor and chair of religious studies at Grinnell, will speak about works in the exhibition based on his research in comparative religions. Dobe will publish a book this year about Hindu and Christian holy men (faqirs) of colonial north India.
Artists @ Grinnell Residency: Swarna Chitrakar
Oct. 3–9
Swarna Chitrakar is a member of India’s Patua community of painter-singers who travel from village to village recounting stories and legends in song while revealing scroll paintings.
Chitrakar has participated in major festivals in Australia, Asia, Europe, and North America, sharing her scrolls and songs, which explore current socio-political issues including HIV/AIDS, child trafficking, and women’s empowerment.
She will be accompanied by translator Suravi Sarkar.
Co-sponsoring these events are Grinnell College’s Institute for Global Engagement and the Departments of Religious Studies and Music.
Demonstrations and Conversation with Swarna Chitrakar
Oct. 3, 3–5 p.m.
Oct. 5, 2–4 p.m.,
Oct. 6 and 9, 3–5 p.m.
Gallery Talk: Swarna Chitrakar
Oct. 4, 4 p.m.
The painter-singer will speak about the development and content of her work.
Community Day
Oct. 7, 1:30–3 p.m.
Enjoy demonstrations by artist-in-residence Swarna Chitrakar, plus storytelling and hands-on activities.

For more information about related programs in late October and November, visit Faulconer Gallery.

Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week (closed Nov. 23, Thanksgiving Day), and admission is free. The Faulconer Gallery is in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, 1108 Park St., Grinnell.

Public Events Performance: Declassified Memory Fragment

Baker and Tarpaga Dance Project will perform Declassified Memory Fragment at Grinnell College on Saturday, Sept. 16. The free, public performance will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Flanagan Theatre in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, 1108 Park St., Grinnell.

A 70-minute dance theater work with live music, Declassified Memory Fragment explores ideas and themes around memory, history, and images of some of the political and cultural realities affecting the continent of Africa.

The work was created as an open letter on African society — its lifestyles, cultures, beauty, complexities and politics. Declassified Memory Fragment works to declassify, or reveal, the aspects of everyday life that are subjected to restrictions and cultural expectations of secrecy and privacy, even within the family.

The performance at Grinnell College is partially funded by the New England Foundation for the Arts National Dance Project Presentation Grant, with lead funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Creating a rich blend of live music and physical image making, Baker and Tarpaga Dance Project is a transnational dance theatre project based in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, and Philadelphia. Ethnochoreographers Esther Baker-Tarpaga and Oliver Tarpaga co-founded the project in 2004. Drawing from Africanist and postmodernist aesthetics, the project integrates choreography, spoken word, and live music soundscapes.

Baker and Tarpaga Dance Project has performed worldwide, from the Dance Bridge International festival in Tokyo and Centre de Développement Chorégraphique la Termitière in Burkina Faso, to the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts at Cornell University in New York.

Tickets

While the event is free, tickets are required.

They will be distributed starting Wednesday, Sept. 13 at the box office in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts.

Tickets are free to those present at the box office during open hours between noon and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Phone reservations are not accepted, although individuals may call the box office at 641-269-4444 during open hours to determine if tickets are still available.

Film Showing: I Am Not Your Negro

At 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 24, the Strand Theater in downtown Grinnell will host a free, public viewing of Raoul Peck's documentary I Am Not Your Negro.

I Am Not Your Negro is an examination of race and racism in America through the lens of James Baldwin's unfinished book, Remember This House. He intended the book to be an account of American history told through the lives of slain civil rights activists Medgar Evers, Malcom X, and Martin Luther King Jr., each of whom Baldwin knew personally. However, Baldwin was only able to assemble 30 pages of notes before his death in 1987.

The film draws on Baldwin's vision to combine his words, archival footage, and scenes from the contemporary United States to illuminate the place of racism in American life. Narrated by Samuel L. Jackson, the documentary makes important connections between the history of racism in the United States and the present moment.

Baldwin, born in 1924 in Harlem, New York, is recognized as one of the 20th century's greatest writers. He was a pioneer who broke new literary ground through his exploration of racial and social issues in his many works. He is especially well known for his unflinching look on the black experience in America through essays such as “Nobody Knows My Name.”

“Baldwin has a prophetic voice,” said Caleb Elfenbein, director of the Center of the Humanities and associate professor of history and religious studies. “Although he was writing decades ago, his thoughts on race and racism help us connect deep currents in American history with contemporary developments, from recent violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, to shocking displays of hate in Creston, Iowa. This film is essential viewing for our community because it will introduce lots of people to perspectives that they may not otherwise hear.”

The viewing is sponsored by the College's Center for the Humanities and the Office of Community Enhancement and Engagement.

UNITY Project Celebrates Individuality and Community

Members of the Grinnell community are invited to take part in an interactive art project designed to celebrate the uniqueness of each member of the community and raise awareness of how labels are impacting our perception of and interactions with the world.

Participants will string yarn between poles labeled with statements that reflect their identities to create a yarn canopy of human connectedness, ultimately showing that we are all connected by something.

The UNITY Project, 1033 Broad Ave., Grinnell, Iowa, will be open to the public the following days/times:

  • September 21, 4-7 p.m.
  • September 22, 5-8 p.m.
  • September 23, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
  • September 24, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Sponsors include Grinnell's Offices of Intercultural Affairs, Diversity and Inclusion, International Student Affairs, and Community Enhancement and Engagement. The Grinnell Arts Council is a community partner.

Running Named a 2017 Iowa Arts Council Fellow

Lee Emma Running, associate professor of art, joins a writer, a musician, a filmmaker, and another visual artist as a 2017 Iowa Arts Council Fellow.

Each will receive access to professional development opportunities, promotional support to enhance their careers, and a $10,000 grant to support new works. They will also participate in Creative Capital's Core Weekend Professional Development Program, one of the nation's premier artist professional development programs, and will participate in "Meet the Artist" public programs at various arts and cultural venues throughout the state.

Lee Emma Running

Lee Emma RunningRunning makes installations and sculptures inspired by natural phenomena, working with animal bones, paper, fabric, fur, raw pigments, and gold. She moved to Iowa City in 2001 to apprentice with papermaker Timothy Barrett at the University of Iowa Center for the Book where she learned to analyze materials and processes as well as maintain the discipline of a fine craft.

Running has done artist residencies at Jentel in Wyoming, Penland School of Crafts in North Carolina, the Santa Fe Art Institute in New Mexico, and the Vermont Studio Center in Vermont.

Her work has been exhibited at the Des Moines Art Center, the Charlotte Street Foundation, the Robert C. Williams American Museum of Papermaking, and the Urban Institute for Contemporary Art.

She received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Pratt Institute in 1999 and a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Iowa in 2005. She is represented by Olson-Larsen Galleries.

The Iowa Arts Council Fellowship

A panel of of Iowa arts professionals selected as this year's fellows, who were ​honored ​during a ceremony with Gov. Kim Reynolds and Lt. Gov. Adam Gregg at the State Capitol.

Besides Running, the other 2017 fellows are:

  • River Breitbach of Rickardsville,
  • Jennifer Drinkwater of Ames,
  • Jack Meggers of Des Moines, and
  • Rachel Yoder of Iowa City.

“Iowa has a proven track record of developing talented artists. In return, these individuals use their abilities to strengthen our state’s cultural vitality,” Gov. Reynolds said. “I’m proud to recognize these five artists as our newest Iowa Arts Fellows and am eager to hear about the incredible experiences they’ll have over the next year.”

“More Iowans recognize the important role the arts play in improving quality of life across our state,” Lt. Gov. Gregg said. “Iowa has nearly 6,000 art-related businesses that employ nearly 23,000 people. The governor and I are proud to support artists who choose to build their careers in Iowa and commit to contribute to our communities.”

The Iowa Arts Council created the multi-discipline Artist Fellowship Program in 2014 to support professional, active Iowa artists who are at a pivotal point in their careers and who demonstrate exceptional creativity and the capacity to contribute to the excellence and innovation of the arts in Iowa.

Learn more at Lee Emma Running's site or the Iowa Arts Council.

 

Exhibition of Summer Student Artists

An exhibition of artworks created by elementary students in area summer programs will be on view at Grinnell College's Faulconer Gallery from 4:30-5:30 p.m. on Friday, July 28. The exhibition will include paintings, cyanotypes, sculptures, and books, and is free and open to the public.

The student works will be installed next to works in the Faulconer Gallery's summer exhibition of pop art, “Shiny, Sticky, Smooth: Pop Art and the Senses — from the Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer and his Family Foundation.”

"Shiny, Sticky, Smooth" opened on July 1 and continues through Sunday, Sept. 3. Appropriate for all ages, the exhibition of more than 70 pop art prints and sculptures features generations of America's most famous pop artists from the 1960s to 1990s. Pop art emerged from the booming consumer culture in post-World War II America, combining advertising imagery and strategies with bold colors and familiar objects.

This exhibition includes works by Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Wayne Thiebaud, Robert Rauschenberg, Claes Oldenburg, Jeff Koons and other exceptional artists who offer viewers deeper understanding of pop culture in the form of art.

Faulconer Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week, and admission is free. The Faulconer Gallery is in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, 1108 Park St., Grinnell.

‘Shiny, Sticky, Smooth’ Eye-Popping Art Exhibition To Grace Faulconer Gallery

“Shiny, Sticky, Smooth: Pop Art and the Senses — from the Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer and his Family Foundation" will be open to the public from Saturday, July 1, through Sunday, Sept. 3, 2017, in Grinnell College's Faulconer Gallery.

Appropriate for all ages, the exhibition of more than 70 pop art prints and sculptures features generations of America’s most famous pop artists from the 1960s to 1990s. Pop art emerged from the booming consumer culture in post-World War II America, combining advertising imagery and strategies with bold colors and familiar objects.

 “Pop art was initially based on advertising and pop culture in the ‘50s, adapting principles of commercial design to the making of fine art. In today’s lexicon, we would call it ‘branding,’“ says Daniel Strong, curator of exhibitions for Faulconer Gallery. “Pop artists looked to consumer product advertising for their inspiration. It’s an art movement that turned brands into art and gave them stature.”

 “Shiny, Sticky, Smooth” includes works by Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Wayne Thiebaud, Robert Rauschenberg, Claes Oldenburg, Jeff Koons, and other exceptional artists who offer viewers deeper understanding of pop culture in the form of art.

“This appealing summer show goes a long way to making people realize they understand more of art than they think that they do,” said Lesley Wright, director of Faulconer Gallery. “These well-known artists, most not displayed here before, have made art out of everyday objects. The works in this exhibition are bright, colorful, fun, and will be recognizable to viewers’ senses of sight, sound, taste, touch and smell.”

Among the vivid, eye-catching collection, summer visitors to Faulconer Gallery will see:

  • Warhol’s iconic soup can screen print;
  • Lichtenstein’s “Interior Series” of furnishings from the ’60s;
  • Robert Cottingham’s “American Signs” as art;
  • Thiebaud’s lithographs of familiar food; and
  • Rauschenberg’s mixed media of slingshots.

Faulconer Gallery events related to the pop art exhibition include:

Yoga in the Gallery with Monica St. Angelo
Thursdays, July 6 through Sept. 7, 12:15-12:50 p.m.
Enjoy a 30-minute yoga practice, including warming and invigorating poses and a final period of relaxation. All levels welcome. Mats provided. Co-sponsored by Live Well Grinnell.
Exhibition of Summer Student Artists
Friday, July 28, 4:30-5:30 p.m.
The community is invited to view artworks created by students in area summer programs, installed next to works in “Shiny, Sticky, Smooth.” Refreshments will be served.

Faulconer Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week (closed Tuesday, July 4), and admission is free. The Faulconer Gallery is in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, 1108 Park St., Grinnell.