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Humanities

Calendar Customer Code: 
HUMANITIES_DIVISION

Alumni Recitation Hall (ARH)

The Alumni Recitation Hall contains classrooms for classes in the Social Studies and Humanities, as well as faculty offices for departments of foreign languages and Classics. The facilities also include a 158-seat screening auditorium, the multipurpose Meredith AudioVisual Center, and an additional computer lab with multiple printers for both classroom and general student use.

ARH is wheelchair accessible. An elevator at the south end makes it easy to reach the auditorium and accessible restrooms on the third floor. Automatic door operators are located on the southeast and southwest sides, and accessible parking is available along Park Street.

Guest Artist: Nina Assimakopoulos

Internationally acclaimed flutist Nina Assimakopouloshas been hailed as "...a marvel!" (Münchner Merkur), and a versatile virtuoso with a "dramatic sense of pacing" who demonstrates "not just perfect technique and total breath control but supreme intelligent, elegant phrasing; broad tone color; lyricism; a full range of dynamic expression; and above all STYLE that paints the differences from Bach to Bartok..." (American Record Guide).

A champion of contemporary music, Nina Assimakopoulos is credited with over 50 international world-premiere performances and commissions, as well as multimedia collaborative projects and concerts integrating baroque through contemporary flute music with visual and digital arts, dance, and theater.

Career Highlights include her New York Solo Debut at Carnegie Hall, solo recitals at The Alden Theater "Rising Stars" Concert Series in Washington, D.C., the "Dame Myra Hess Radio Broadcast Concert Series" in Chicago, the "Live from Hochstein" radio broadcast concert series in Rochester, New York, and the AmBul New Music Festival in Sofia, Bulgaria.

She has performed as principal flute with the Munich City Opera, Bavarian Radio Symphony Academy Orchestra, the New Hampshire Symphony Orchestra, and the Toledo Symphony Orchestra.

Guest Artist: Linda Pereksta

Linda Pereksta joined the faculty of The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh as Assistant Professor of Flute in 2009. Prior to coming here, she taught at The University of Mississippi and Tulane University. She currently holds the position of Piccolo with the Madison Symphony Orchestra, and has previously been a member of the Arkansas, Tupelo, and Memphis Symphony Orchestras. As a tenured member of the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra in New Orleans, she performed in the orchestra's 2005 joint concert with the New York Philharmonic, playing under the batons of James Conlon, Leonard Slatkin and Lorin Maazel. She can be heard with the two orchestras on the Nonesuch CD, "Our New Orleans," accompanying Randy Newman.

Dr. Pereksta has been featured as a concerto soloist with Belle Meade Baroque, the Germantown Symphony Orchestra and the Tallahassee Bach Parley, and has performed with Mallarmé Chamber Players, jazz artist Nnenna Freelon, Baroque Southeast, Fiori Musicali, the Iowa Center for New Music, and numerous professional orchestras.

Dr. Pereksta holds degrees from The University of Iowa, The Peabody Conservatory of Music and Florida State University. She was a two-time recipient of Peabody Career Development Grants, and as a Doctoral Fellow at FSU, taught Baroque Flute and Recorder, directed the Baroque Ensemble and earned the Certificate in Early Music. Her doctoral treatise, "Twentieth-Century Compositions for the Baroque Flute," was a winner of the National Flute Association's 2004 call for DM/PhD Papers. Twice a major prizewinner in the NFA Baroque Flute Artist Competition, Dr. Pereksta later served as Coordinator of the competition and is presently Chair of the NFA's Historical Flutes Committee. She is Editor of TRAVERSO (a quarterly historical flute newsletter), has published articles in The Flutist Quarterly, and has performed and presented at numerous NFA conventions.

Her primary flute teachers have included Betty Bang Mather, Leone Buyse, Charles DeLaney and Robert Willoughby. She also studied baroque flute with Christopher Krueger and Colin St. Martin, recorder with Michael Lynn, and orchestral conducting and literature with the late James Dixon.

2013 Iowa Flute Festival

IOWA FLUTE FESTIVAL 2013: Saturday February 23

FLUTE OUT OF THE BOX: New Paths for the 21st-Century Flutist

Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, Grinnell College

If you want to put an exact address into your GPS, Bucksbaum Fine Arts Center is located at 1108 Park St. in Grinnell. Welcome to the homepage of the 2013 Iowa Flute Festival at Grinnell College, with guest artists Nina Assimakopoulos and Linda Pereksta! Nina is a specialist in contemporary music who is also a prize-winning painter. Linda is both a Baroque and modern flutist who has won awards for her performance and scholarship on early music for traverso; she is also distinguished for presenting ground-breaking new compositions on the same instrument.

Discover your own paths to becoming an expanded, more complete flutist and musician. The two guest artists represent innovative achievements in each of their specialties that lead to out-of-the-box approaches to their instruments. Workshops, panels, warmups, and master classes will present traditional methods alongside new perspectives on how to improve your playing and explore your unique personality as a musician.

The Festival will take place in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts on Saturday February 23, between 8:30 AM and 6 PM. You may download registration forms (general registration form, Flute Wonders Competition form, and exhibitor form) from the website and print them out. Please mail in all registrations with payment to the address on the forms, by the dates indicated on each of them.

We look forward to a spectacular Festival on the beautiful campus of Grinnell College and are excited to have you join us!

Registration - Humanities Student Research Poster Session

The poster session will be Saturday, September 26, 2015; 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. in the John Rosenfield Center on the second floor, as a part of Family Weekend activities. Any Grinnell College student who has conducted research (either on- or off-campus) in the past year and wants to present a poster about that research may register. Registration deadline is September 17.  Participants should get a message from De by the end of that week to confirm that your form was received.

Roberts Theatre

The Roberts Theatre semi-thrust stage, seating 450, was renovated and restored under the design of Cesar Pelli and Associates (New Haven, CT). The project was completed in 2000.

For more information about the Roberts Theatre please call the Technical Director at 641-269-3130.

 

Sebring-Lewis Hall

Sebring-Lewis Hall, opened in 1999, seats 338 people in a 4,050 square-foot space. It is the home of most music department performances and numerous guest artist events. One of the first ensembles to perform in the hall, the American String Quartet, described it as "one of the two or three best halls in the country for chamber music." The rich colors and cherry wood details in the hall make it as beautiful aesthetically as it is acoustically. Electrically adjustable curtains in the upper back of the hall allow for a tunable acoustic. A well-equipped control room and numerous computer data and sound connection points within the hall itself allow Sebring-Lewis to accommodate experimental computer music as well as chamber and ensemble performances. 

Bucksbaum Center for the Arts

Parking and Access

Bucksbaum Center for the Arts is located at the corner of Park Street and 6th Avenue. On-street parking is available on the east side of Park Street between 5th and 8th Avenues and in visitor spots around campus. Accessible parking is available in the cul-de-sac off 6th Avenue. See Maps and Directions for more information.

Recital Hall and Rehearsal Rooms

Sebring-Lewis Hall in the Bucksbaum Center has elevated Grinnell's musical performance tradition by providing an intimate, accessible, and acoustically responsive space. Well suited for student and faculty recitals and concerts, the recital hall preserves and enhances the College's level of musical excellence. Student performers test their skills here, and students in the audience discover new musical interests as they are exhilarated by listening to live music.

Key Features

  • Square feet of recital hall: 4,050
  • Seating capacity of recital hall: 348
  • Type of stage floor: tongue-in-groove, cherry
  • Portable seated risers
  • Two Green Rooms
  • Sound-isolated control room
  • Separate rehearsal spaces for large ensembles, early music, and non-Western instruments
  • Square feet of early music hall: 1,125
  • Square feet of ethno music hall: 940
  • Square feet of large ensemble rehearsal room: 1,940

Gallery

The Faulconer Gallery is an inspiring aesthetic experience. It also offers a valuable learning and teaching experience for students, faculty, and the campus community.

Key Features

  • Square feet of gallery space: 7,420
  • Climate control system
  • Flexible and functional exhibition space for diverse artistic genres
  • Special reception desk, which reflects the shape of the building
  • Five lighting zones, ranging from natural to five-foot candles
  • Square feet of storage space: 1,870
  • Square feet of workshop space: 725
  • Square feet of packing and preparation area: 1,200

Theatres and Dance Studio

The theatre component of the Bucksbaum Center allows for innovation and the means to enhance Grinnell's theatre tradition. The Flanagan Studio Theatre provides students and faculty with space for experimentation and refinement. Built to be flexible, the studio theatre allows for multiple seating arrangements and lighting possibilities.

Key Features

  • Square feet of studio theatre: 2,000
  • Seating capacity of studio theatre: variable, 120 maximum
  • Square feet of scene shop: 3,200 with paint area
  • Square feet of dance studio: 1,170
  • Dedicated dust collection system in scene shop
  • Number of major power tools: 10 including table saw, radial arm saw, drill press
  • Ceiling height in scene shop: 20 feet
  • Sprung floor in Roberts Theatre, properly constructed for dance
  • Separate welding room
  • Circuiting systems for lighting
  • House light system
  • Upgraded lighting and sound systems
  • Costume shop with separate dye, wash, and spray rooms
  • Sound/recording studio
  • One Green Room
  • Dressing and make-up rooms

Art Studios

A ceramics studio, a sculpture studio, a printmaking studio, a painting studio, and several multipurpose studios optimize faculty and student interaction. Students are no longer turned away from studio art courses because of a lack of space. In addition, art studios for visiting artists attract speakers and artists from around the nation, giving students exposure to a variety of artistic styles and techniques.

Key Features

  • Number of art studios: 11
  • Square feet of faculty art studios: 500
  • Square feet of sculpture studio: 2,200
  • Square feet of ceramics studio: 2,200
  • Square feet of multipurpose studio: 1,750
  • Square feet of printmaking studio: 2,400
  • Square feet of painting studio: 1,930
  • Square feet of drawing studio: 1,760
  • Track lighting in all studios
  • Special air handling and exhaust systems
  • Separate welding room
  • Separate kiln room
  • Art computer room

Music Practice, Classroom, and Lab Spaces

The Bucksbaum Center offers an environment that accommodates students and fulfills educational needs. Students have access to technologies that aid teaching and learning, including an electronic music laboratory, a multimedia arts laboratory, and a CD-ROM library of audio and visual materials.

Key Features

  • Total number of music practice rooms: 15
  • Square feet for practice rooms: varies from 50 to 250
  • Largest practice room: percussion
  • Special rooms for percussion, harp, and two-piano practice
  • Square feet of electronic music studio: 500
  • Thirteen-station music keyboard and computer lab
  • Multimedia production laboratory
  • Floor, ceiling, and wall treatments for sound isolation
  • Special software and hardware for music notation, ear training, and group keyboard instruction
  • Audio-, video-, and computer-equipped classrooms and seminar rooms
  • Climate control system for instrument storage

Carnegie Hall

Carnegie Hall, 1210 Park Street, is located north of Herrick Chapel. Dedicated June 13, 1905, the building is in modified Classical form with a low hipped roof, impressive cornice with dentils, red-brick walls, and quoins outlining window areas. The middle section of the facade is framed by two imposing pilasters with six engaged columns within the frame, the pilasters and columns all topped with Ionic capitals. A frieze surmounting the walls bears the names of some of the greats of Western civilization: Shakespeare, Dante, Homer, Plato, Michelangelo, Darwin, Goethe, Galileo, Emerson, and Caesar.

Carnegie Hall today houses classrooms and offices for Humanities faculty. At the rear of the building is the College Bookstore, which was added in 1970.