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Bookstores to be Closed June 18 – July 4 While Moving

The Grinnell College Bookstore, on campus, and the Pioneer Bookshop, at 823 4th Ave., will be closed for moving starting on June 18, 2016.

The two stores will be combined at the new location at 933 Main Street, Grinnell. The new store will open on July 5 as the Pioneer Bookshop. The online bookstore is also closed during the move.

The new Pioneer Bookshop will still offer the same wide selection of children’s books and toys, fiction, and non-fiction. It will also have the same special order service and gift wrapping.

In addition, the store will feature Grinnell College clothing, school and office supplies, art supplies, consumer electronics, greeting cards, and gifts.

Goldstein Earns Academic All-America Honors

Grinnell College’s Daniel Goldstein ’16 joined elite company Tuesday when he became the 24th Pioneer in history to earn Academic All-America recognition.

Goldstein made the At-Large Team after enjoying a stellar diving and scholastic career at Grinnell.

The team is chosen by the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA), The At-Large category covers 16 sports, including Grinnell’s offerings of men’s and women’s swimming and diving, golf, and tennis.

Goldstein, a computer science/mathematics major from Ann Arbor, Mich., qualified for the NCAA Division III National Championships for the third year in a row this season. He earned honorable mention All-America honors twice.

A three-time Midwest Conference Diver of the Year, he won five league titles in his career and owns school and MWC records in 1-meter diving for 11 dives (score of 529.45), 1-meter diving for six dives (333.55) and 3-meter diving for six dives (335.90).

Goldstein three times earned Academic All-District recognition and in 2016 collected Grinnell’s Morgan Taylor ’26 Award for outstanding senior athlete.

2016 Research Award Winners

Grinnell College librarians Julia Bauder, Kevin Engel, and Phil Jones are recipients of the 2016 Research Award from the Iowa Chapter of the Association of College and Research Libraries. Their article, Mixed or Complementary Messages: Making the Most of Unexpected Assessment Results,” was published this March in College & Research Libraries, 77(2), 197-211. Read their remarks upon accepting the award during the ILA/ACRL 2016 Spring Conference.  

Summer Research in Chemistry is Underway

Chemistry summer research has begun! Thirty-five students are working with ten faculty mentors in the chemistry department on a variety of projects, such as conductivity of lithium electrolytes, dynamics and synthesis of biological molecules, biogeochemistry in aquatic systems, and the use of metal oxides as photocatalysts.

Safety training is a priority before lab work commences. One session involved all participating students practicing to use a fire extinguisher. 

Besides literature searches and bench work, chemistry's summer program also involves presentations from research groups and a culminating poster session. The department will host two social picnics throughout the summer as well. 

Research projects are funded by various sources, including Grinnell College's MAP program and Erickson fund, and grants from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Health, and the National Science Foundation's Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation. 

Mark Christel Named Librarian of the College

Mark ChristelMark Christel, director of libraries at the College of Wooster in Ohio, will be the next Samuel R. and Marie-Louise Rosenthal Librarian of Grinnell College. He was selected through a national search and will begin his new position on Aug. 1.

"Mark Christel brings an impressive record of leadership and innovation to the Grinnell College Libraries," said Michael Latham, vice president for academic affairs and dean of Grinnell College. "His experience in promoting student and faculty research, interdisciplinary digital initiatives, external grants and collaborations, facilities design and strategic planning makes him well suited to this role. I am confident that he will provide outstanding leadership for the Grinnell College Libraries, and I am grateful to members of the search committee for their efforts."

Christel has served with distinction in positions of increasing responsibility over the past 22 years at Hope College, Vassar College and the College of Wooster. Since joining Wooster as Director of Libraries in 2008, Christel built close collaborations with faculty to support student learning, carefully stewarded collections, and championed emerging technologies to promote open access and scholarship. 

He is a committed advocate for the application of digital technologies in teaching and research. He also was the lead author of two Mellon Foundation grants awarded to the Five Colleges of Ohio and has served on the steering committee for the Institute for Liberal Arts Digital Scholarship. 

"I am so honored to be joining Grinnell and its exceptional library staff," Christel said. "Grinnell’s foundational commitment to undergraduate research and teaching creates an exciting context for exploring the traditional and evolving facilities, services and collections offered by contemporary academic libraries.  

"I look forward to many engaging conversations about what the libraries are and might become, and then working with key campus partners and my colleagues within the libraries to achieve that vision over the coming years."

Christel succeeds Julia Bauder, who was named interim director of Grinnell's libraries last October after Richard Fyffe, Samuel R. and Marie-Louise Rosenthal Librarian of the College and associate professor, began permanent medical leave. He died on Nov. 5, 2015, due to complications from ALS.

"It is very humbling," Christel said, "to follow in the footsteps of Richard Fyffe, a friend and colleague whom I greatly admired."

An award-winning librarian, Fyfe made vital contributions to many national partnerships and consortia. He also was an eloquent advocate for libraries' central role in fulfilling the educational mission at Grinnell and other liberal arts colleges.

In announcing Christel's appointment, Latham said, "I want to thank Julia Bauder for her great commitment and dedication in serving as interim director of the libraries. At a time when Grinnell sought to recover from the loss of Richard Fyffe, she brought great energy and vision to a challenging task, and she excelled at it. We are all in her debt."

Audition for Grinnell Singers! Fall 2016

New Grinnell Singers Auditions

Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, Room 152

  • Monday, August 22, 3:30–5 p.m.
  • Tuesday, August 23, 3:30–5 p.m.
  • Wednesday, August 24, 7–8 p.m.

Sign up for an audition

Returning Singer Auditions

Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, Room 152

  • Thursday, August 25, 4:15–6 p.m.; 7–9 p.m.
  • Friday, August 26, 4:15–6 p.m.

All returning students are required to complete an individual audition. We need to complete these auditions for returning students before the callbacks on Saturday, so we will need the cooperation of the returning students in fitting in all of these individual appointments on the Thursday and Friday of the first week of the semester.

Sign up for an audition

Callback Group Auditions

Sebring-Lewis Hall , Saturday, August 27

  • Altos, 10–11 a.m.
  • Sopranos, 11 a.m.–noon
  • Basses, 1–2 p.m.
  • Tenors, 2–3 p.m.

For the Audition

Please fill out the information sheet provided online prior to the audition.

The ten-minute individual audition will consist of:

  • Singing measures 1 through 35 of “Laudibus in sanctis” by William Byrd.  You are encouraged to study the excerpt ahead of time.  We’ll be singing this wonderful piece in the fall, so any work that you do on it to prepare for the auditions will help to give us a leg up on it.  By the way -- this is totally optional -- if any of you choral enthusiasts are just raring to go and have an abundance of energy you are welcome learn the entire piece and submit it to the Grinnell Virtual Choir.  There is a conducting video on the GVC web site; just follow the instructions to submit your own video. 

  • Singing back short melodies played on the piano (testing tonal memory).
  • Testing your range using a simple pattern, such as 1-5-4-3-2-1 on "ee" and "ah" vowels. The pattern will move up and down by half steps.

Optionally, you may sing a prepared piece up to three minutes long. It is helpful to hear how you sound when you're singing a piece that you know well. Any style is acceptable — whatever allows you to show your musical and vocal personality. Again, this is optional; it is perfectly ok if you don't have a prepared piece.

I'm looking forward to meeting you and hearing you sing!

Generall Historie of Plantes

The Herball, or, Generall Historie of Plantes, gathered by English surgeon and botanist John Gerarde, is a lushly illustrated guide to botany and herbal medicine. Special Collections is home to a rare first edition printing of the Herball, published by John Norton in 1597. This 419-year-old book is remarkably intact; however abrasions on the cover and minor stains and tears throughout demonstrate that this book was frequently consulted. In fact, Gerarde’s Herball was the most widely circulated book on plants published in English in the 17th century.

The first edition of the Herball consists of 1,484 pages divided into three books: “The First Booke of the Historie of Plants, Containing Grasses, Rushes, Corne, Flags, Bulbose, or Onion-rooted Plants,” “The Second Booke… Containing the description, place, time, names, nature, and vertues of all sorts of herbs for meate, medicine, or sweete smelling use, etc.,” and “The Third Booke… Containing… Trees, Shrubs, Bushes, Fruit-bearing plants, Rosins, Gums, Roses, Heath, Mosses: Some Indian plants, and other rare plants not remembered in the Proeme to the first booke. Also Mushrooms, Corall, and their several kindes, etc.”

The Herball was published more than a century prior to Linnaean taxonomy; therefore, the plants discussed within the book are not organized according to rank-based classification. Instead, Gerarde arranged the plants using a classification system based on differences of leaf structure. The back of the Herball contains multiple indices, including a table of the “Nature, Vertue, and Dangers of all the Herbes, Trees, and Plants, of the which are spoken in this present Herball.

Gerarde’s prose combines naturalistic description and Elizabethan folklore. For example, Gerarde writes that Tragopogon, pictured on these pages, is commonly known as “Go to bed at noone,” “for it shutteth it selfe at twelve of the clocke, and sheweth non his face open until the next daies sunne do make it flower anew” (595). The author’s description of the medicinal uses for Tragopogon is equally poetic. He writes that the root of Tragopogon “warmeth the stomacke, prevaileth greatly in consumptions, and strengthneth those that have been sicke of a long lingering disease” (596).

Although the Herball bears Gerarde’s name, most of the book is a translation of a renowned herbal published by Dutch scholar Rembert Dodoen in 1554. Furthermore, Gerarde did not translate the entire book himself; he took over the translation project from Robert Priest, a member of the London College of Physicians who died before the book was published. Additionally, almost all of the eighteen hundred woodcuts in the Herball were taken from the Eicones Plantarum of Jacobus Theodorus, published in 1590, which were in turn reproductions from other earlier works. Though Gerarde was the superintendent of the gardens of the adviser to Queen Elizabeth, his knowledge of botany fell short and he paired many plant descriptions with the wrong illustrations. A second edition of the Herball, corrected and expanded to around 1,700 pages by London apothecary Thomas Johnson, was published in 1633, two decades after Gerarde’s death.

Gerarde is often credited with contributing original entries about plants from his own garden, including plants from the New World that were considered rare and exotic at the time. Notably, Gerarde’s Herball contains the first English description of the potato. Gerarde obtained a Virginian potato plant for his own garden through his contacts with explorers Walter Raleigh and Francis Drake. The illustration included with his entry, which is one of the only original woodcuts in the Herball, was the first depiction of the potato many English people had ever encountered.

We encourage anyone with an interest to drop by Special Collections and take a look at this book in person.  Special Collections and Archives is open to the public 1:30-5:00pm Monday through Friday and mornings by appointment. Additional information about the Herball can be found on the websites for the University of Virginia Historical Collections at the Claude Moore Heath Sciences Library and on the Encyclopaedia Romana published in affiliation with the University of Chicago.

http://exhibits.hsl.virginia.edu/herbs/herball/

http://penelope.uchicago.edu/~grout/encyclopaedia_romana/aconite/gerard.html#anchor5371

 

Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Program Loan Repayment

Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellows who have entered a Ph.D. program in a Mellon designated field within 39 months of graduation from Grinnell are eligible for up to $10,000 in loan repayment benefits. For each year of full-time graduate study, one-eighth of your undergraduate debt (up to $1,250) can be paid by the Mellon Foundation through Grinnell College. Students who complete their doctorate are eligible for an additional $5,000 in loan repayment.

Lopatto to be Honored for Excellence in Science Education

David Lopatto headshotDavid Lopatto, the Samuel R. and Marie-Louise Rosenthal professor of natural science and mathematics, professor of psychology, and inaugural director of the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Assessment, will receive the 2016 Bruce Alberts Award for Excellence in Science Education.

The American Society for Cell Biology selected Lopatto for the award for his leadership in assessing the benefits of undergraduate research experiences. The award is named after former ASCB president Bruce Alberts.

“It is significant that professional scientific organizations are recognizing work in science education,” Lopatto says. “Understanding the student experience and the best practices for science learning are essential for inspiring the next generation of scientists and science teachers.”

Central to Lopatto’s research and national impact have been several survey instruments that capture student self-reported feedback and enable analysis of the impact of experiences on student self-perceived gains in knowledge, skills, and confidence in research.

The Survey of Undergraduate Research Experiences (SURE) was developed by Lopatto in 2004 and was the first instrument available to faculty and program directors for assessing the impact of research programs. It was quickly adopted by faculty for use in diverse applications.

Since the introduction of the SURE (now in its third iteration), Lopatto has directed the development of related instruments, including measures of perceived student impacts of classroom-based Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) research; interdisciplinary STEM curricula; and research in non-STEM areas. These assessment tools are now used by over 150 institutions with more than 10,000 students annually.

Possibly the most significant impact of Lopatto’s work has been in establishing standardized faculty practice for assessment, which has laid the groundwork for development of new approaches and tools for student outcomes assessment.

Progress in the past decade has advanced assessment practice in STEM communities, and the conversation has expanded to include education researchers, cognitive scientists, and evaluation scholars, all of whom now inform practical understanding of student learning in STEM. These interactions not only advance assessment practice but also have led to new scholarship including discipline-based education research.

As noted by one of Lopatto’s nominators, Cynthia Bauerle at Howard Hughes Medical Institute, “These developments continue to motivate improvements in faculty practice initiated originally by the efforts of early researchers like Dr. Lopatto, who recognized the importance of assessment practice as a driver for improved teaching, for achieving a more ‘scientific teaching.’“

Lopatto will accept the award on Dec. 4 at the ASCB annual meeting in San Francisco.