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Adult Community Exploration Series (ACES) offered by faculty this summer

Thursday, May. 26, 2011 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA - Grinnell College will offer the Adult Community Exploration Series (ACES) throughout the summer with courses taught by faculty in anthropology, biology and French. The free courses, co-sponsored by the Community Education Council and Grinnell College, will be held on Wednesday mornings from 10 to 11:30 a.m. in the Pioneer Room of the college's Old Glove Factory, located at 733 Broad Street in Grinnell. Registration is requested to assist instructors in preparing for class needs. To register, send email to calendar@grinnell.edu, or call 641-269-3178.

Courses for summer 2011 include:

“Americans in Paris: Through the Looking Glass”

June 15, 22

Taught by Jan Gross, professor of French, and Dan Gross, director of the Alternate Language Study Option (ALSO) Program

As an international meeting place for revolutionary and artistic movements, and a refuge from racial, gender and political barriers, Paris has been many things to many Americans. This course will examine the myths and realities associated with the City of Light through literary readings, films, memoirs, essays and sites of American interest.

Jan and Dan Gross have been regular visitors to Paris for more than 40 years. Jan, who is Seth Richards Professor in Modern Languages, has taught French at Grinnell since 1977. Her area of research is contemporary performance and how theatre expresses identity. She taught a tutorial for first-year students on the ACES topic. Dan specializes in language self-instruction and pedagogy. He created the college’s self-instructional ALSO program and serves as an officer of the National Association of Self-Instructional Language Programs.

“Vaccinations and Society”

June 29, July 6

Taught by Shannon Hinsa-Leasure, assistant professor of biology

Class participants will discuss many aspects of vaccinations, including the discovery of vaccines, compliance and non-compliance with recommended guidelines, and the responsibility to provide effective low-cost vaccines to the world. Discussions will include how race, gender and religion influence choices.

Shannon Hinsa-Leasure holds a Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology from Dartmouth Medical School. Her research investigates traits important for bacterial survival in the extreme environment of the Siberian permafrost; specifically, she examines the genes necessary for bacteria to attach to surfaces and form biofilms under a variety of environmental conditions.

“Rethinking Local History for the Sake of a Local Future”

July 13, 20

Taught by Jon Andelson, professor of anthropology and director, Center for Prairie Studies Small-town Iowa has a past that deserves to be preserved and remembered. But does small-town Iowa have a future? What will the future be? Does the past we remember have anything to do with the future we create? The class will explore these questions while sharing and rethinking local history.

Jon Andelson, Rosenfield Professor of Social Science, studies intentional communities, the relationship between humans and nature, sustainability, agriculture and religion. He is currently working on a book about the Amana culture and history. Jon co-founded the Grinnell Area Local Foods Alliance, served on the Imagine Grinnell board, and serves on the board of Grinnell-Newburg Educational Excellence.

“The French Revolution: History and Present-day Consequences”

July 27, Aug. 3

Taught by David Harrison, associate professor of French, and director, Center for International Studies This class will explore how religion, democracy, elitism and state authority emerged during the French Revolution and Enlightenment. Harrison will lead the class in discussion of how these ideas apply and are contested in contemporary France.

David Harrison teaches French and the literature and culture of the 17th and 18th centuries. He has published scholarly articles on French writers of these periods and is currently researching the 17th century French novel. As director of the Center for International Studies, he oversees initiatives to increase the global dimensions of student and faculty work.

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Two alumni receive Wall Awards for service projects

Monday, Jun. 13, 2011 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA -  

Grinnell, IA
 
6/13/11

Two Grinnell College alumni have been awarded Joseph F. Wall Alumni Service Awards of $25,000 each for service projects in their selected non-profit organizations.

The Wall Alumni Service Awards are named for the late Joseph F. Wall, a Grinnell College alumnus and long-time professor of history who inspired an ideal of social responsibility in his Grinnell students. The awards provide financial support for Grinnell graduates to engage in service projects, programs, and organizations that are dedicated to improving the lives of others.

Since the inception of the Wall awards in 1996, more than $750,000 has been distributed to the service projects of more than 30 Grinnellians.

The 2011 Wall Alumni Service Award winners are:

Wall Award winner Leah Bry '04• Leah Bry, a 2004 Grinnell graduate, who works with GreenLeaf, a Denver-based organization encouraging youth to grow fresh foods. The young people also grow by challenging themselves in an environment that creates lasting, just and sustainable social change, in addition to health and nutrition knowledge.

 

 

Wall Award winner Jeff Mok '02• Jefferson Mok, a 2002 Grinnell graduate, who developed radio programming in Burundi to open information flow to citizens in the civil war-torn country. The radio show offers a sustainable public forum and community participation in sharing of perspective and individual experiences of life in Burundi.

The Wall Alumni Service Awards are open to all graduates of Grinnell College with a service commitment to benefit others. For more information, go to:http://www.grinnell.edu/offices/socialcommitment/awards/wall/.

Grinnell College is a nationally recognized, private, four-year, liberal arts college located in Grinnell, Iowa. Founded in 1846, Grinnell enrolls 1,600 students from all 50 states and from as many international countries in more than 26 major fields, interdisciplinary concentrations, and pre-professional programs.

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Two third-year students awarded competitive Goldwater Scholarships

Wednesday, Mar. 30, 2011 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA - Grinnell, IA

3/30/11

Two Grinnell College students have been awarded Goldwater Scholarships for up to $7,500 toward tuition and expenses for the 2011-12 academic year. The Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship Program was established by Congress to encourage excellence in science and mathematics for American undergraduate students with excellent academic records and outstanding potential.

Boanne MacGregor, a third-year math and physics double major from Fairfield, Ia., and Emily Blythe, a third-year biological chemistry major from Kalamazoo, Mich., received Goldwater Scholarships to complete their Grinnell educations.

MacGregor plans a career in theoretical physics and to teach at the university level.

As a Grinnell student, MacGregor has served as a teaching assistant and member of the student educational policy committee for the physics department and as a volunteer for Grinnell Women in Science.

 

Blythe plans a career in biomedical or pharmacological research.

As a Grinnell student, she has been involved in the Student Environmental Committee; Grinnell Women in Science; the student educational policy committee for biological chemistry; Grinnell Swing Society; a contributing artist to the student literary magazine; and an actor for the Neverland Players.

Kevin Jennison, a third-year biology major from Lake Geneva, Wisc., received honorable mention in the national scholarship competition.

Grinnell College is a nationally recognized, private, four year, liberal arts college located in Grinnell, Iowa. Founded in 1846, Grinnell enrolls 1,600 students from all 50 states and from as many international countries in more than 26 major fields, interdisciplinary concentrations, and pre-professional programs.

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U.S. immigration experts to examine all sides of timely policy issue Apr. 11-14

Tuesday, Mar. 29, 2011 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA - Grinnell, IA

3/29/11

Immigration—complicated policies, controversial possibilities. A Grinnell College symposium on “U.S. Immigration Policy,” Apr. 11-14, will examine a wide range of viewpoints on this timely topic, with experts on both sides of open and closed borders; representatives of immigration and asylum services; and interdisciplinary perspectives on the way forward.

“No matter what your point of view,” said Sarah Purcell, director of the college’s Rosenfield Program, “there’s agreement that U.S. immigration policy is broken. It’s a topic of local, state, national, and international concern that touches people in unexpected ways, and we plan to explore all sides of this policy issue.”

The immigration policy symposium, sponsored by Grinnell’s Rosenfield Program in Public Affairs, International Relations and Human Rights, will include the following free, public events:

• Mon., Apr. 11, 12 noon: Immigration-related student presentations based on tutorial projects, mentored advanced projects (MAPs), and Alternative Break projects. Joe Rosenfield ’25 Center, 2nd floor atrium.

• Mon., Apr. 11, 7 p.m.: Teach-In by members of the Grinnell faculty providing interdisciplinary background on immigration from the fields of sociology, history, political science, and anthropology.

• Tues., Apr. 12, 4:15 p.m.: Mark Kirkorian, executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies, will argue for tighter controls in “Mass Immigration vs. Modern Society.” The Center for Immigration Studies is a non-profit research organization which examines the impact of immigration on U.S. resources. Kirkorian frequently testifies before Congress and has appeared on 60 Minutes, Nightline, NewsHour with James Lehrer, CNN, and NPR.

• Wed., Apr. 13, 4:15 p.m.: Jonathan Blazer, policy attorney for the National Immigration Law Center, will discuss the interaction between federal and state immigration laws. The National Immigration Law Center is dedicated to advancing the rights of low-income immigrant families. Blazer’s main focus at the law center is on promoting immigrant access to economic supports and educational opportunities.

• Wed., Apr. 13, 8 p.m.: Representatives from immigration services throughout the state will lead a panel discussion on “Iowa and U.S. Immigration Policy.”

• Thurs., Apr. 14, 11 a.m.: The Scholars’ Convocation on “A Nation of Immigrants?” will be delivered by Mae Ngai, Lung Family Professor of Asian American Studies and professor of history at Columbia University. Her book, “Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America,” has won numerous awards for addressing the controversial topic of immigration reform.

• Thurs., Apr. 14, 4:15 p.m.: Jeffrey Heller, a New York City asylum attorney, will offer perspectives on representing asylum seekers. Heller has taught clinical immigration and asylum law, written on immigration issues for Bender’s Immigration Bulletin and The Westchester Guardian, and opened his home to released immigrants for more than 25 years. Heller’s daughter Rebecca is a senior history major at Grinnell.

• Thurs., Apr. 14, 8 p.m.: Wall St. Journal editorial board member Jason Riley will close the symposium with a discussion of his book “Let Them In,” which stresses the economic value of open borders. Riley has worked since 1994 at the Journal, where he continues to write on social issues such as immigration reform.

All symposium events will be held in Room 101 of the Joe Rosenfield ’25 Center on the Grinnell College campus, unless otherwise noted. For more information about the symposium, contact Sarah Purcell,purcelsj@grinnell.edu, 641-269-3091.

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Mini-grants to local projects announced

Monday, Mar. 7, 2011 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA -  

Grinnell, IA
3/7/11

Eleven Grinnell area organizations will benefit from more than $30,000 in grant support from the Grinnell College Mini-Grant Program for arts, educational and community initiatives.

“We increased both the maximum grant amount and the total grant funds available from the program this year so we were better able to meet community needs,” said Monica Chavez-Silva, director of community enhancement and engagement. The maximum award increased to $7,500 for the annual mini-grant program, which has, since 2002, funded more than $131,000 in small-to mid-scale projects for the Grinnell area.

Traditionally, the grants review committee has been comprised of faculty, staff and Grinnell College students from the local area. This year, the review committee, led by Chavez-Silva, added two community members, Rick Ramsey and Monique McLay Shore.

Of the 25 proposals submitted, the volunteer committee designated full or partial funding to the following projects this spring: Drake Community Library for electronic book service; Grinnell Area Arts Council for computer and office equipment; Grinnell Area Chamber of Commerce for website development; Grinnell Big Brothers Big Sisters for activities to support mentor matches; Grinnell Community Daycare and Preschool for a school bus; Grinnell Little League for field upgrades; Grinnell Parks and Recreation Department to improve Arbor Lake shelters; Grinnell Police Department for patrol bicycles; Grinnell Regional Medical Center for electronic records wireless access; PALS animal shelter for insulated pet doors; and Poweshiek County Fair Association for campground improvements.

For more information about the mini-grant program, contact Chavez-Silva at 641-269-3900,chavezsm@grinnell.edu, or visit the website: http://www.grinnell.edu/Offices/communityenhance/minigrant. - 30 -

 

Abraham Inc. to perform cross-cultural, cross-genre concert Jan. 31

Thursday, Jan. 20, 2011 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA - Funk, jazz and hip hop will collide in a Grinnell College performance by Abraham Inc.—an eclectic group of klezmer, clarinet, and trombone—on Mon., Jan. 31 at 7:30 p.m. in Herrick Chapel.

Featuring klezmer artist and clarinetist David Krakauer; funk trombonist Fred Wesley; and hip hop architect Socalled, Abraham Inc. creates a new musical space, “a cross-cultural, cross-genre development.” The group’s debut release “Tweet Tweet” topped Billboard’s charts as #1 in funk, #1 in Jewish and Yiddish music, and #7 in jazz, plus #35 in music sales on Amazon.

“This is a not-to-miss performance,” said Rachel Bly, director of conference operations and events at Grinnell. “This concert is all about collaboration, mutual respect and breaking down boundaries. There is something for everyone with this fun, upbeat music created by world-class musicians.”

Tickets are required for this free public performance and may be obtained at the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts box office, beginning Wed., Jan. 26, noon-5 p.m. Limited tickets are also available from the Pioneer Bookshop in downtown Grinnell. For ticket questions, call 641-269-3101 or go to http://www.grinnell.edu/car/confops/publicevents/.

Abraham, Inc.’s appearance at Grinnell is sponsored by the college’s Public Events Committee. Herrick Chapel is located at 1128 Park St. Grinnell welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. If accommodations are needed, please contact the event’s sponsoring organization as soon as possible to make a request.

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Trustees approve faculty promotions

Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 11:30 am

 

This spring, the Grinnell College Board of Trustees announced the promotion of faculty members to new ranks for the 2010-11 academic year:

• Promoted to full professor: Vicki Bentley-Condit (anthropology); Katya Gibel Mevorach (anthropology); Kathleen Skerrett (religious studies); and Susan Strauber (art).