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Liberal Arts Colleges Reach Minds Behind Bars

Fri, 2013-01-04 02:24 | By Anonymous (not verified)

 

Contacts: 

 Lauren Sieben, Chronicle of Higher Education

Liberal-Arts Colleges Reach Minds Behind Bars

By Lauren Sieben

Re-published with permission of The Chronicle of Higher Education

John Hammers spent the past 12 years behind bars. His daily routine consisted mostly of playing pinochle or spades and watching sitcoms on television. Serving time for burglary, he wanted to better himself, but he had no outlet.

Why a bill proposed to sell Pollock's "Mural" is a bad idea

Fri, 2013-01-04 02:24 | By Anonymous (not verified)

Posted by:  Lesley Wright

State Rep. Scott Raecker, a Grinnell alumnus, has introduced a bill in the Iowa Legislature to sell a painting, Jackson Pollock's "Mural," owned by the University of Iowa Museum of Art in order to create a fund to pay for scholarships for art students. For more on the original story see:

Eco House

This college-owned house is one of the three available project houses on campus. A project house consists of students with a common interest and a desire to promote that interest to the campus community. Groups interested in a house must submit a project proposal and present their proposal to the Residence Life Committee for consideration. This school year (2012—13), this house has been awarded to Eco House, a group working towards sustainable living and environmentalism. To learn more about the project house process, visit the Residence Life Project Houses page.

College contemplates wind turbines to lower carbon footprint, costs

Tue, 2012-04-24 07:51 | By Anonymous (not verified)

The Grinnell College Board of Trustees initiated a series of studies at its February meeting designed to result in a wind farm to supply power for college use. College officials are now preparing a financing plan, performing feasibility studies and considering locations to gather information for a detailed plan for the trustees. The studies, which could take as much as two years, will assess a wind farm estimated at three turbines costing around $13 million and possibly supplying as much as half the college’s power consumption.

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