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Dutch Global Horizons and Phi Beta Kappa

Larry SilverLarry Silver, Farquhar Professor of Art History at the University of Pennsylvania, will present a Scholars' Convocation, "Dutch Global Horizons," at 11 a.m. Thursday, April 28, in Joe Rosenfield '25 Center, Room 101. The event is free and open to the public.

Silver's presentation is part of Grinnell's Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Program. New members of Phi Beta Kappa will be announced at the beginning of the convocation.

Silver describes his presentation as an exploration of the imagery of the seaborne empire of the Netherlands during the Golden Age of the 17th century, when Dutch ships plied the oceans and established commercial and political links with bold Old World Asia and New World Latin America. He also notes that images of India and East Asia, as well as the short-lived Dutch colony in Brazil, permitted armchair travelers in Amsterdam to experience the globe as never before.

Silver, who received his bachelor's degree from the University of Chicago and his master's and doctoral degrees from Harvard University, is a specialist in painting and graphics of Northern Europe. He focuses primarily on works produced in Germany and the Netherlands during the era of Renaissance and Reformation. He has served as president of the College Art Association and the Historians of Netherlandish Art. He recently was honored with the University of Pennsylvania’s Lindback Award for Teaching Excellence. 

His publications include Rubens, Velázquez, and the King of Spain, Rembrandt’s Faith, Peasant Scenes and Landscapes, Hieronymus Bosch and a general survey, Art in History. He has organized a number of print exhibitions, among them Grand Scale: Monumental Prints in the Age of Dürer and Titian and Graven Images, dealing with professional engravers of the 16th-century Netherlands.

Grinnell College welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. Room 101 in the Rosenfield Center is equipped with an induction hearing loop system, which enables individuals with hearing aids set to T-Coil to hear the program. Accommodation requests may be made to Conference Operations and Events.

Alternative Universities as Sites of Creativity

Artists from the Bruce High Quality Foundation University (BHQFU) and Vincent Katz, a professor of art at Yale University, will give talks on alternative universities as sites of creativity on Wednesday, April 20, at Grinnell College.

The free and public talks will take place at 7:30 p.m. Joe Rosenfield ’25 Center, Room 101.

Earlier that day, the founders of BHQFU will hold a workshop, “B.Y.O.U.: Build Your Own University,” in the Masonic Temple downtown, 928 Main St., Grinnell. The workshop on teaching and learning will take place from 1-3 p.m. It is free and open to the public.

The founders of BHQFU will “How to Die an Artist: Resistance and Futility.” BHQFU, founded in 2009, is New York’s Freest Art School. It provides tuition-free classes, residencies, workshops, exhibitions and public programs to a community of thousands of New Yorkers. The school is an alternative to contemporary art schools that emphasize professionalization.

A professor at the Yale University of Art, Katz will discuss “Black Mountain College: Finding the Center in the Remote.” His lecture will cover the pedagogy of Black Mountain College in terms of its location and locus, especially as related to the college’s later years. He also will discuss Black Mountain’s relevance today, as a model, and also consider parallels to modern, remotely-operated web-based experience of culture.

Katz is a celebrated poet, critic, translator, editor and curator. His criticism has been published in numerous books, catalogs, and journals, including in Apollo, Art in America, ARTnews and Art on Paper, among others. He is also the author of The Complete Elegies Of Sextus Propertius, winner of the National Translation Award in 2005.  

He has curated several celebrated exhibitions, including an exhibition on Black Mountain College for the Reina Sofia museum in Madrid, and Street Dance: The New York Photographs of Rudy Burckhardt for the Museum of the City of New York.

The Center for Humanities is sponsoring these events as part of this year's theme: Sites of Creativity: Streets, Salons, Studios, and Schools.

Fracture: Essays, Poems, and Stories on Fracking in America

A panel of four Iowa-based writers, editors, thinkers, and environmentalists will discuss Fracture: Essays, Poems, and Stories on Fracking in America, the country's first anthology of creative writing that explores hydraulic fracturing, at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, April 19, in Joe Rosenfield '25 Center, Room 101. The discussion is free and open to the public.

Debra Marquart, Carolyn Raffensperger, Frederick Kirschenmann, and Taylor Brorby will all read their work from the anthology and explore impacts of hydraulic fracking on Iowa.

The Center for Prairie Studies and the Environmental Studies Concentration are sponsoring the event.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. You can request accommodations from Conference Operations and Events.

Debra Marquart

Marquart is a professor of English at Iowa State University, teaching in the Master of Fine Arts program in Creative Writing and Environment. The author of a memoir, The Horizontal World: Growing up Wild in the Middle of Nowhere and two poetry collections, she has received numerous honors for her work, including John Guyon Nonfiction Award, the Mid-American Review Nonfiction Award, a New York Times Editor's Choice commendation, and a 2008 National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Prose Fellowship.

Carolyn Raffensperger

Raffensperger is an environmental lawyer specializing in the changes in law and policy necessary to address climate change and preserve public health and the environment. She is executive director of the Science and Environmental Health network, and has edited three comprehensive volumes on the precautionary principle of environmental law. Her work has been featured in Gourmet magazine, the Utne Reader, Yes! Magazine, the Sun, Whole Earth, and Scientific American.

Frederick Kirschenmann

A national expert in sustainable agriculture, Kirschenmann is a family farmer, writer, and scholar on ecology. He has held numerous appointments, including director of the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture at Iowa State University. He also has served on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Organic Standards Board and the National Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production. His farm has been featured in numerous publications, including National Geographic, Business Week, Audubon, and Gourmet magazine, for its diverse crop rotation and productivity without using synthetic inputs. His book, Cultivating an Ecological Conscience: Essays from a Farmer Philosopher, traces the evolution of his ecological and farming philosophy over the past 30 years.

Taylor Brorby

The editor of Fracture, Taylor Brorby is an award-winning essayist, poet and environmentalist. He is currently pursuing his masters of fine arts in Creative Writing and Environment at Iowa State University. His work has been featured on Minnesota Public Radio and North Dakota Public Radio and in numerous newspapers. A talented writer himself, he is currently working on two poetry collections, one related to the Bakken oil boom and the other about the Adirondacks in upstate New York, as well as an essay collection about western North Dakota.

Nelson Ogbuagu ’16 Wins Short Story Contest

Grinnell College senior and winner of the Nick Adams Short Story Contest, Nelson Ogbuagu Nelson Ogbuagu ’16 has been named the winner of the Associated Colleges of the Midwest 2016 Nick Adams Short Story Contest. His story, "Playing it Safe," was selected from the 32 stories submitted by students from ACM colleges.

Author Bill Hillman, who served as the final judge for the contest, awarded first prize to Ogbuagu, praising his story as “a psychological thriller and a coming of age tale of an introspective and sensitive youth” that “works on a lot of levels.”

A Chicago native, Ogbuagu is an economics major. His interest in writing, inspired by his love for hip-hop music and storytelling, started in high school, where he served as both an arts and entertainment and a sports editor.

He began to write short stories in a creative writing course he took at Grinnell with author Dean Bakopoulos, assistant professor of English.

“His mentorship, teaching, feedback, and general support as I developed in his classes and outside of them not only made me a better storyteller through writing, but also encouraged a type of self-exploration that made me believe that I had meaningful stories to tell,” Ogbuagu said.

These workshop-based courses require students to read each other’s work and give extensive critiques in class discussions. “After all of that feedback, we’d go and make a revision that was very deep, very heavy,” said Ogbuagu. “You really get a very sharp sense as to the different ideas that different types of writers have for the directions you can go with a story. It really informed how I could take a certain experience and craft it in a way that I hadn't originally considered.”

In addition to writing, Ogbuagu serves as co-chair of the All Campus Events Committee of the Student Government Association and co-leads the Latin American Dance club. This fall, he will join LinkedIn’s Business Leadership Program for global sales in San Francisco. He plans to continue writing and eventually pursue a master’s degree in fine arts.  

Grace Lloyd ’16, a senior from Allentown, New Jersey, was awarded honorable mention for her story "Crush." She is an English and theatre major with a concentration in technology studies. She is currently writing a novella with the mentorship of Bakopoulos and plans to continue writing after graduation.

The Nick Adams Short Story Contest has been held annually since 1973 by the ACM. Winners receive $1,000, made possible by a gift from an anonymous donor.

Racialized State Violence and the Movement for Black Lives

In a free, public event, Damon Williams ’14 will present “Bigger Than the Cops: Racialized State Violence and the Movement for Black Lives” at 4 p.m. Thursday, April 28, in ARH Auditorium, Room 302.

After a brief presentation, Williams will join in a one-on-one conversation with Shanna Benjamin, associate professor of English. Alexandra Odom ’17 will introduce participants and set the stage for the discussion.

At 5 p.m., there will be a break for refreshments. Attendees will return at 5:15 p.m. for a workshop with Williams and Kesho Scott, associate professor of American studies and sociology.

Event sponsors include Alumni in the Classroom Program, Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Center for the Humanities, Peace and Conflict Studies, the Departments of Sociology, American Studies, and Economics, and the Rosenfield Program in Public Affairs, International Relations, and Human Rights.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. You can request accommodations through Conference Operations and Events.

About Damon Williams ’14

After a brief presentation, Williams will join in a one-on-one conversation with Shanna Benjamin, associate professor of English at Grinnell College. Senior Alexandra Odom will introduce participants and set the stage for the discussion.

At 5 p.m., there will be a break for refreshments. Attendees will return at 5:15 p.m. for a workshop with Williams and Kesho Scott, associate professor of American studies and sociology at Grinnell.

Williams is a community producer, organizer, radio host, hip-hop performance artist, actor, teacher and public speaker from the south side of Chicago. He has performed across the country with his sister, Kristiana Colón, as the poetic duo April Fools. He also co-hosts "AirGo Radio," a weekly show on WHPK, Chicago Community Radio.

In addition, Williams co-chairs the Chicago chapter of Black Youth Project 100, a national political organization comprised of black youth ages 18-35. He co-edits the #LetUsBreathe Collective, an artistic activist organization that serves underprivileged people and creatively disrupts the anti-black racist status quo.

Committed to addressing economic inequality, Williams also serves as the co-director of the Ujamaa Jr. Investment Club, which promotes financial literacy and investment strategies.

Dave Stamey & Grinnell Symphony Orchestra

The Grinnell Symphony Orchestra will perform with celebrated Western musician Dave Stamey in concert at Grinnell College on Saturday, April 16.

A singer, songwriter and guitarist, Stamey also has been a cowboy, a mule packer, a dude wrangler, and is now one of the most popular Western entertainers working today. His "Vaquero Song" is widely considered one of the best Western songs of all time.

The performance will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Herrick Chapel. No tickets are required for this event, which is free and open to the public.

Stamey also will conduct a songwriting workshop from 4:15 to 5:45 p.m. Friday, April 15, in Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, Room 103. The workshop, which is free and open to all, offers a great chance to talk with Stamey and learn about the art and business of songwriting.

In 2010, 2011, and 2013, Stamey was named True West Magazine's "Best Living Western Solo Musician." The Western Music Association has voted Stamey Entertainer of the Year seven times, Male Performer of the Year six times, and Songwriter of the Year five times. He also received the Will Rogers Award from the Academy of Western Artists.

Stamey says he has long dreamed about it, but this will be his first time performing with a symphony orchestra, said Grinnell Professor of Music Eric McIntyre who directs the Grinnell Symphony Orchestra. Stamey will sing 10 of his songs that McIntyre has arranged for orchestra.

"The orchestra has a long history of performing with soloists and ensembles that are not from the standard classical tradition," McIntyre said. "These include collaborations with Grinnell College's Young, Gifted and Black gospel choir, Jazz Ensemble, a hip-hop DJ narrator, and even a traditional German Oompah band.

"This performance will be the first time the orchestra has worked with a singer/songwriter," McIntyre added. "It is a wonderful opportunity to expand our range of styles and savor the experience of working with a popular artist."

McIntyre noted that Stamey has a big following and that the College has received inquires from people who plan to travel to Iowa to hear Stamey perform with an orchestra.

"It's going to be an amazing show," he said. "We recommend that people come early to get good seats."

The Grinnell Symphony Orchestra is comprised of student musicians representing all disciplines within the College who are unified by a love of music and a dedication to the art of orchestral performance.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. You can request accommodations from Conference Operations and Events.

Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity Symposium

The Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity Symposium will take place in the Joe Rosenfield ’25 Center and will feature the work of over 70 students.

Please come support the students as they present their papers, posters, readings, and performances.

Tuesday, April 12
11 a.m.-1 p.m., Poster Sessions and Panels, Rosenfield Center, various rooms
Wednesday, April 13
8 a.m.-4 p.m., Posters on display, Rosenfield Center, Room 101
Thursday, April 14
11 a.m.-1 p.m., Moderated panels, Rosenfield Center, various rooms

Detailed Symposium Schedule

April 11–14, 2016

Monday, April 11: Opening Reflections

7–9 p.m. Opening Reflections – Faulconer Gallery

Please join us as David Cook-Martin, Eliza Kempton, and Lee Running reflect on the value of research and creative work to their own scholarly pursuits, and then join us to view the Studio Art Faculty Exhibition and BAX: Bachelor of Arts Exhibition, a juried show featuring the work of third- and fourth-year students. These events will be followed by a dessert reception.

Tuesday, April 12: Poster Session and Moderated Panels

A light lunch is available in Rosenfield Center, Room 101

11 a.m.–1 p.m. Poster Session – Rosenfield Center, Room 101

  • Ana Karin Kozjek ’17
  • “Efficacies and Kinetics of Potential PET Ligand Agonists of α7 nAChR Differ”
  • Ian Dixon-Anderson ’17 and Thomas Robinson ’16
  • “Ionic Conductivities of Silyl and Carbonate Blend Electrolytes”
  • Michael Fitzpatrick ’16
  • “Morphological and Physiological Characterization of a Novel Subpopulation of Perisynaptic Schwann Cells”
  • Minna Montgomery ’16
  • “Synthetic Investigations Toward Biologically Active Derivatives of Polypeptide Macrolactones”
  • Nathan Kolacia ’16
  • “Synthesis and Characterization of Molybdenum(V) Imido Complexes with N-Salicylidene-2-Aminophenol”
  • Ryan Davis ’16
  • “Sex-Specific Antipredator Response to Auditory Cues in the Black Spiny- Tailed Iguana”
  • Helen Colliton ’16 and Maddy Pesch ’16
  • “Substituted Chalcones”
  • Peter Anderson ’16
  • “Police Use of Excessive Force Against People of Color in Baltimore”
  • Hannah Brown ’16
  • “Improving Clinical Trial Transparency”
  • Glorianne Dorce ’17
  • “Cuban Adjustment Act Reform”
  • Sophia Shin ’16
  • “Asian-American Mental Health Policy”
  • Sarina Farb ’16
  • “Setting Federal Nutrition Guidelines that Best Reflect Nutrition Science”
  • Jacob Ziontz ’16
  • “Effect of High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity on Spatial and Declarative Memory”
  • Maile Leathem-Rietz ’17
  • “CAFO in Poweshiek County, Iowa, Is a Reservoir for Carbenicillin Resistance Genes”
  • Caroline Graham ’16
  • “Marine Policy in the Arctic: Looking to the Future”
  • Deborah Msekela ’17
  • “Dissolved Organic Matter Sulfidization and Impact on HgS Bioavailability for Methylation”
  • Connor Mulligan ’17
  • “Organosilyl Electrolyte Conductivities, Lithium Transference Numbers, and Solvation Shells via PFG-STE NMR Diffusion Experiments and Their Application in Lithium-Ion Batteries”

11 a.m.–noon Studying Grinnell: Exploring Our Local Community – Rosenfield Center, Room 209

  • Sarah Henderson ’16
  • “Increasing Attendance at the Grinnell Historical Museum”
  • Samantha Snodgrass ’16
  • “Water and Landscape Management in Grinnell”
  • Summer Jones ’17
  • “Determining Students’ Postsecondary Plans: A Program Evaluation of the Tools Used by Grinnell High School’s Counseling Department”
  • Roselle Tenorio ’17
  • “Food Security Barriers for Rural Food Pantry Clients”

11 a.m.–noon Colonization and Hybridity – Rosenfield Center, Room 227

  • Aminata Kinana ’18 “Discourses on Mixity: How Identity and Difference Are Viewed in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania”
  • Willa Collins ’16 “Cult Classic: The Academy and Popular Religion in Colonial and Post-Renovation Vietnam”Sofia Mendez Subieta ’19 “Rethinking the Defeat of the Aztec Empire”
  • Rebecca Wong ’17 “Negotiating the Boundary Between Christianity and Filial Piety in Modern-Day Hong Kong”

11 a.m.–noon Culture, Confrontation, and Dislocations – Rosenfield Center, Room 226

  • Hening Zhang ’16
  • “A Search for Liberal Arts Studenthood in Modern China: Student Activism in Yenching University, 1918–1949”
  • Fangda Li ’16
  • “Through the Eyes of Shanghai Jewish Refugees: German, Austrian Jews in Shanghai”
  • Fenyi Wu ’17
  • “Red Amnesia: Responses to the Cultural Revolution in Contemporary Chinese Art”
  • Alyssa DeBella ’19
  • “Ritual Action and Social Spectacle: The Creation and Systematic Destruction of The Hunger Games”

11 a.m.–noon Interventions in Media Studies – Rosenfield Center, Room 225

  • Sophie Donlon ’16
  • “Confronting the Gaze: Reconfiguring Spectatorship in Untitled (Kitchen Table Series) by Carrie Mae Weems”
  • Lily Seibert ’19
  • “I Can’t Tell What’s Real Anymore: Paying the Price of Reality Television and Media”
  • Kai Vorhies ’19
  • “Capitol Whistleblowers: The Ethics of Mass Surveillance”
  • Meredith Carroll ’16
  • “The Marvelous and the Modern: Selling the Phonograph in Victorian London”

11 a.m.–noon Representations of Space and Time – Rosenfield Center, Room 202

  • Cameron Frank ’16
  • “Spatial Dependence in Newton-Cartan Gravity in Noninertial Reference Frames”
  • Jun Taek Lee ’18
  • “Randomness of Multifractal Systems”
  • Kaiqian Zhang ’17 and David Koychev ’16
  • “New Formulas from LU Matrix Decomposition”

Noon–1 p.m. Cognition, Meta-Cognition, and Knowledge – Rosenfield Center, Room 202

  • Lizzie Eason ’17
  • “Priming Epistem Stances”
  • Krista Matthews-Saugstad ’16
  • “Investigating Gestures”
  • Isabel Monaghan ’16
  • “Priming Epistem Stances”

Noon–1 p.m. Production, Consumption, and Capitalism: Across Time and Place – Rosenfield Center, Room 203

  • Rosemarie O’Brien ’16
  • “Chinese Art Today: Rural Aesthetics vs. Urban Commodities”
  • Jenny Samuels ’16
  • “Moral Capitalism and Democracy in the Third New Deal: Keynesian Fiscal Policy after the 1937–1938 Recession”
  • Mari Holmes ’17
  • “Analyzing the Multiplicity of Childhood and Who Gets Access”

Noon–1 p.m. Environmental Challenges and Responses – Rosenfield Center, Room 209

  • Jackson Dunnington ’16
  • “Cross-Temporal Analysis of Sociocultural Response to Drought in the American West”
  • Greg Margida ’16
  • “Racism of Climate Apathy”
  • Cassandra Miller ’16
  • “An Analysis of the 17th Karmapa as an Effective Environmentalist”

Wednesday, April 13 Posters on Display

8 a.m.–4 p.m. Posters on display – Rosenfield Center, Room 101

Thursday, April 14 Moderated Panels

A light lunch is available outside Rosenfield Center, Room 209

11 a.m.–noon Performances – Rosenfield Center, Room 101

  • Ivy Kuhn ’16
  • “The National Water Dance: Somatic and Site-Specific Dance-Making”
  • Alexandra Barnard ’17
  • “I Dream Before I Take the Stand”
  • Aaron Israel Levin ’17
  • “Brass Quintet”

11 a.m.–noon Women of Color Negotiating Agency and Representation – Rosenfield Center, Room 225

  • Alexandra Odom ’16
  • “Perceptions of Impact Among African American Women in the Civil Rights Movement”
  • Jocelyn Acosta ’16
  • “Race, Class, and Sex Work”
  • Jermaine Stewart-Webb ’16
  • “Discussing Black Female Sexuality with Private Letters: The Nellie McKay and Nell Irvin Painter Correspondence”

11 a.m.–noon Education and Pedagogy – Rosenfield Center, Room 226

  • Carlina Arango ’16
  • “An Evaluation of Al Exito’s Impact on Participants in the Program’s First Three Years (2006–09)”
  • Paulina Campbell ’16
  • “Pedagogy and Social Change”
  • Katherine Tucker ’16
  • “The Gendered Nature of Social Class: How Intersecting Identities Inform College Students’ Plans for Relationship and Family Formation”

11 a.m.–noon Explorations in the Digital Humanities – Rosenfield Center, Room 227

  • Emily Hackman ’16
  • “Civil War Memory and GIS”
  • Paige Wheeler ’16 and Julia Marquez-Uppman ’17
  • “Blood vs. Love: Power in Early Modern Spain”
  • Noah Schlager ’16
  • “Digital Amanas”

Noon–1 p.m. Novella Readings – Rosenfield Center, Room 101

  • Hannah Condon ’16 River Valley Natives
  • Emma Thomasch ’16 Where We Go From Here
  • Leo Abbe-Schneider ’16 French Rollins
  • Phoebe Mogharei ’16 Careless
  • Grace Lloyd ’16 Saccharine

Noon–1 p.m. Individuals and Nations – Rosenfield Center, Room 203

  • Lauren Yi ’18
  • “The Religion of Victimhood in North Korea: How Juche Ideology Shaped a New Nation”
  • Dhruv Gupta ’17
  • “Variables Underlying Trust in Nation-States”
  • Colleen Moser ’16
  • “West African Communities in France: Contemporary Challenges for Malian Village Associations and Transnational Development”

Noon–1 p.m. Surveying Sex at Grinnell College – Rosenfield Center, Room 209

  • Melissa Melloy ’16
  • “Love for One or Love for All: Polyamory at Grinnell College”
  • Mara Rosenberg ’17
  • “Queering High Street: Investigating Strategies for Same-Sex Hookups at Grinnell College”
  • Elaina Notman ’16
  • “Preference for Intoxication in Consensual Sexual Encounters”

Noon–1 p.m. Intimate Surfaces: Troubling the High/Low Divide – Rosenfield Center, Room 202

  • Eliza Harrison ’16
  • “Early Sonia Delaunay: The Avant-Garde at Home”
  • Lauren Roush ’16
  • “Fabric Portraits”
  • Mai Pham ’16
  • “Traces of Pop in Dinh Q. Lê’s Art”

Sponsored by the Office of the Dean of the College.

The dean’s office wishes to thank Vance Byrd, Jennifer Dobe, Andrew Graham, Jan Graham, Kelly Maynard, Casey Oberlin, Terri Phipps, Andi Tracy ’99, Tilly Woodward, and the Dining Services staff for their assistance in organizing this symposium.

If you require an accommodation in order to attend or fully participate in any of these events please contact Maria Tapias or the coordinator of disability resources, Autumn Wilke, or call 641-269-3702.

Fred Magdoff: Capitalism and Agriculture

On Monday, April 11, Fred Magdoff, emeritus professor of plant and soil science at the University of Vermont, will discuss capitalism, agriculture, soil, and soil health in two event.

He will give a talk, “Capitalism and Agriculture” at 7:30 p.m. in Joe Rosenfield '25 Center, Room 101. Before the talk, Magdoff will lead a roundtable discussion about “Soil and Soil Health” at 4 p.m. in Noyce Science Center, Room 1022.

Grinnell College's Center for Prairie Studies is sponsoring the events, which are free and open to the public.

“When a leading soil scientist and a leading political activist are the same person, the results are bound to be interesting,” said Jon Andelson, Rosenfield professor of social science-anthropology and director of the Center for Prairie Studies. “Professor Magdoff will subject the capitalist context of American and world agriculture to critical scrutiny, as he has in much of his published work. If you believe capitalism is the best economic system for agriculture, come and hear an argument to the contrary.”

Numerous social and ecological problems arise from the way that agriculture functions within capitalist economies, according to Magdoff. These include hunger in the midst of plenty, lack of nutrient cycling, poor rotations, inhumane raising of animals on factory farms, poor treatment of farm and slaughterhouse labor, and environmental pollution with pesticides and fertilizers.

He asserts that these problems are outcomes of a system in which the overriding goal and motivating force is profit. In such a system, decisions that makes sense from the narrow economic standpoint, are frequently ecologically and socially irrational.

Magdoff's interests range from soil science to agriculture and food (science, production, economics, policy) to the environment to the U.S. economy. His science research has expored ways to improve soil fertility, especially focusing on the critical role of soil organic matter. He oriented his agricultural outreach activities to explaining the application of ecological principles to food production.

He is co-author of Building Crops for Better Soil: Sustainable Soil Management and What Every Environmentalist Needs to Know About Capitalism. He is co-editor of Agriculture and Food in Crisis: Conflict, Resistance and Renewal. His forthcoming book, Creating an Ecological Society, is due out later this year.

Student and Faculty Exhibitions at Faulconer Gallery

Student and faculty exhibitions at Faulconer Gallery open with a combined reception at 4 p.m. Friday, April 8.

The student BAX Exhibition will be on view through May 1, while the Studio Faculty Exhibition will continue through June 19.

Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week, and admission is free. The gallery will be closed for Memorial Day on May 30.

Bachelor of Arts Exhibition (BAX)

Caelum Froikin and Ezra Edgerton "Flipbook No. 1"

An electric flipbook created by seniors Caelum Froikin and Ezra Edgerton "Flipbook No. 1," 2016 Archival digital print, wood, power drill.

The Bachelor of Arts Exhibition features works in the creative arts by students at Grinnell College.

BAX is an exhibition of works by advanced third- and fourth-year art students. This year, the exhibition will feature works by 22 students in a variety of media including painting, photography, print, drawing, sculptures, textiles, interactive art, performance art, and installations.

Student-selected juror Jane Gilmor, professor emerita of art at Mount Mercy University in Cedar Rapids, will present awards at 4:15 p.m. during the opening reception. Gilmor is a nationally recognized artist from Iowa with work in the Faulconer Gallery, Grinnell College Art Collection.  Her project, “(Un)Seen Work,” was featured in the Faulconer Gallery exhibition “Culturing Community” in 2010.

Students on the art department's student educational policy committee organize the exhibition with support from the Faulconer staff. They manage all the exhibition details from the submission of proposals, to the selection of a juror, to the installation and awarding of prizes.

This year's organizers are  Hannah Condon ’16, Hannah Kelley’16, and Lauren Roush ’16.  

Studio Faculty Exhibition also opens April 8

BAX will be shown in conjunction with the Studio Faculty Exhibition, which will feature work by professors in the art department:

  • Jeremy Chen
  • Mary Coats
  • Andrew Kaufman
  • Matthew Kluber
  • Evan McLaughlin
  • Andrew Orloski
  • Lee Emma Running
  • Jill Davis Schrift

20 Minutes@11

The Studio Faculty Exhibition will feature six 20-minute talks by Grinnell faculty and staff starting at 11 a.m. in Faulconer Gallery.

Tuesday, April 19 — "Death and Drifting: Conversations Between a Poet and an Artist."
Hai-Dang Phan, assistant professor of English, and Jeremy Chen, assistant professor of art, will converse about poetry and art.
Wednesday, April 20 — "Friday I'm in Love."
Matthew Kluber, associate professor art, will investigate the intersection of painting and digital technology.
Friday, April 22 — "Culling the Herd."
Elizabeth Hill, Conard Environmental Research Area manager, and Lee Emma Running, associate professor of art, will discuss our relationship to the wild herd of whitetail deer in Iowa.
Tuesday, April 26 — "Rube Goldberg: Vintage Wine and Marathon Training."
Andrew Orloski, art technical assistant, will explore how complex, deeply philosophical notions can be found in simple, everyday objects and actions.
Tuesday, May 3 — "Series in Progress."
Andrew Kaufman, associate professor of art, will discuss the motivations and processes of his new series of artworks, which are based on forms of fracture.
Friday, May 6 — "Sunday Morning."
Evan McLaughlin, lecturer in art, will discuss how being raised in a religious household during the rise of video game culture inspired his fascination with creativity.

Scholars' Convo: Bestselling Author Roxane Gay

Roxane GayRoxane Gay, a 2014 New York Times bestselling author and feminist scholar, will give a free public reading at  11 a.m. Thursday, April 7 in Joe Rosenfield '25 Center, Room 101.. Her novels and essays have attracted international acclaim for their treatment of complex issues such as gender inequality, sexual violence, institutional racism and body image.

An accomplished scholar, Gay is an associate professor of English at Purdue University in Indiana. Her research interests include the intersections between race, gender, and popular culture, contemporary fiction, and the political novel.

Gay uses her personal experience with race, gender identity and sexuality to inform her analyses and deconstruction of feminist and racial issues in her work. In addition to her more serious scholarly and creative work, she is a well-known figure on social media, with tens of thousands of Twitter followers, many of whom are drawn to her often irreverent and humorous "instant" commentaries on major news events, politics, pop culture, and reality television.

Bad Feminist, her bestselling essay collection, is a personal manifesto that takes readers through the journey of Gay's evolution as a woman of color and describes how feminism affects Gay's own life — for better or worse. The essays cover a wide a range of topics, from competitive Scrabble to novels written by women to advice on acknowledging privilege.

Gay's writings on gender and racial inequality have won numerous awards in recent years and have appeared in Tin House, Oxford American, The New York Times Book Review, Bookforum, Time, The Los Angeles Times, The Nation, The Rumpus, Salon, and many other media outlets.

Gay's debut novel, Untamed State, explores the privilege that made Haitian-American Mireille Duval Jameson a target for kidnapping and the strength she must draw on to survive the kidnapping and reclaim her life. Deadline.com recently reported that the novel will be adapted for film by Beyond the Lights director Gina Prince-Bythewood. Gay is co-writing the script with Prince-Bythewood. Gugu Mbatha-Raw has been selected to portray Jameson.

Gay's latest book, Hunger, is scheduled to be released in June. Hunger focuses on Gay's experience with weight, body image, and building a positive relationship with food.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. Rosenfield Center has accessible parking in the lot to the east. Room 101 is equipped with an induction hearing loop system.  You can request accommodations from Conference Operations and Events.