Communication

Reviewing Tosca

Fri, 2013-01-04 02:23 | By Anonymous (not verified)

 

Each student in the course Tyrants and Tunesmiths: Music and the State in Modern Europe wrote a review based upon the experience of the performance, but adopting the perspective of a particular cultural or political figure from the original premiere in 1900 in Rome.

According to Assistant Professor of History Kelly Maynard, the exercise provides a good way for students to apply the historical training they have been receiving in this unique course to their evening at the opera.

Two students share their reviews:

Judge James R. Wilson ’68

Fri, 2013-01-04 02:23 | By Anonymous (not verified)

I knew Jim from the time that he was a senior at Grinnell College and I was on the admission staff. He and Judge Dale Mossey '68 and I started at the University Law School together in the fall of 1968, an incredible year of presidential resignation, two assassinations, exploding Democratic convention, a close race for the presidency, and the war in Vietnam.

Priming the Pump

Fri, 2013-01-04 02:23 | By Anonymous (not verified)

 

Seeking to maximize the benefits of the decennial accreditation process for formative reflection and conversation, the College requested and received permission from the Higher Learning Commission to engage in a Special Emphasis self study focused on an issue critical to improving our ability to achieve our mission: reinvigorating our traditional commitment to train leaders in public service and social justice as we enter the 21st century. The College's mission reads, in part:

Why Give?

Fri, 2013-01-04 02:23 | By Anonymous (not verified)

 

Everyone has a different reason for pulling out the checkbook and writing a check to Grinnell. We asked several Grinnellians for their thoughts on philanthropy and the College.

Joel Spiegel ’78

Joel Spiegel '78

Why give to Grinnell? Trustee Joel Spiegel says the College needs to stress how giving throughGrinnell can make a difference in the world.

The Evolution of Language

Fri, 2013-01-04 02:23 | By Anonymous (not verified)

Carmen Valentin, newly tenured in Grinnell's Spanish department, also has scholarly and personal interests on two continents -- in her case, Europe and North America. A native of Spain, she received B.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Hispanic philology at the University of Valladolid, and cut her teeth as an instructor by teaching the university's courses in Spanish for foreign students.

Continuing in the Family Business

Fri, 2013-01-04 02:23 | By Anonymous (not verified)

 

For Erik Simpson, English is more than a discipline; it's the family business.

He grew up in Olean, N.Y., the son of an English professor at St. Bonaventure University. His mother, too, is in academe, running the learning center at the local community college. His parents met -- as did he and his wife, Carolyn -- in an English graduate program. Simpson's father teaches the British Romantics; so does he.

That said, Simpson stresses that he never felt any pressure to walk the same path his parents walked. Quite the opposite, in fact.

Walking the Walk

Fri, 2013-01-04 02:23 | By Anonymous (not verified)

 

Issue: 

 Summer 2007

Author: 

 Mark Baechtel

When Grinnell's English department brought Ralph Savarese to Iowa six years ago from Florida, he saw it as a chance to nourish a range of interests that -- to an outsider, at least -- looks not only exhaustive, but downright exhausting.

Following the Connections

Fri, 2013-01-04 02:23 | By Anonymous (not verified)

Shuchi Kapila believes that English is an academic discipline that is anything but merely academic.

"By the time I got to university, the study of English had become a cutting-edge discipline," she says. "I felt that in studying English I would be doing something to change the world of ideas."

Kapila, who grew up in Chandrigarh and New Delhi, came of age intellectually and academically during a time of foment in Indian society, when the roles of women and questions of class were being re-examined from bottom to top.

Goldwater Scholarship for excellence in math and science to Alice Nadeau '13

Friday, Mar. 30, 2012 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA -  

Grinnell College student Alice Nadeau has been awarded a Goldwater Scholarship for up to $7,500 toward tuition and other expenses during the 2012-13 academic year. The Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship Program was established by Congress to encourage excellence in science and mathematics for American undergraduate students with excellent academic records and outstanding potential.

Nadeau, a third-year mathematics major from Waterloo, Ia., plans to pursue a Ph.D. and teach at the university level. “I am currently trying to explore as many areas of mathematics as available to me,” Nadeau said. “This is important in both teaching and research since connections and correlations can and frequently do come from outside one’s own specific field of study.”

As a Grinnell student, Nadeau serves as a student assistant for the Grinnell Science Project pre-orientation program; works in the costume studio for the theatre department; swims for the varsity swim team; and is an active participant in student government.

Grinnell student Rebecca Mandt, a third-year biology major from Mendota Heights, Minn., was named honorable mention in the competition. She plans a career in biomedical research.

Grinnell College is a nationally recognized, private, four year, liberal arts college located in Grinnell, Iowa. Founded in 1846, Grinnell enrolls 1,600 students from all 50 states and from as many international countries in more than 26 major fields, interdisciplinary concentrations, and pre-professional programs.

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