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Fracture: Essays, Poems, and Stories on Fracking in America

A panel of four Iowa-based writers, editors, thinkers, and environmentalists will discuss Fracture: Essays, Poems, and Stories on Fracking in America, the country's first anthology of creative writing that explores hydraulic fracturing, at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, April 19, in Joe Rosenfield '25 Center, Room 101. The discussion is free and open to the public.

Debra Marquart, Carolyn Raffensperger, Frederick Kirschenmann, and Taylor Brorby will all read their work from the anthology and explore impacts of hydraulic fracking on Iowa.

The Center for Prairie Studies and the Environmental Studies Concentration are sponsoring the event.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. You can request accommodations from Conference Operations and Events.

Debra Marquart

Marquart is a professor of English at Iowa State University, teaching in the Master of Fine Arts program in Creative Writing and Environment. The author of a memoir, The Horizontal World: Growing up Wild in the Middle of Nowhere and two poetry collections, she has received numerous honors for her work, including John Guyon Nonfiction Award, the Mid-American Review Nonfiction Award, a New York Times Editor's Choice commendation, and a 2008 National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Prose Fellowship.

Carolyn Raffensperger

Raffensperger is an environmental lawyer specializing in the changes in law and policy necessary to address climate change and preserve public health and the environment. She is executive director of the Science and Environmental Health network, and has edited three comprehensive volumes on the precautionary principle of environmental law. Her work has been featured in Gourmet magazine, the Utne Reader, Yes! Magazine, the Sun, Whole Earth, and Scientific American.

Frederick Kirschenmann

A national expert in sustainable agriculture, Kirschenmann is a family farmer, writer, and scholar on ecology. He has held numerous appointments, including director of the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture at Iowa State University. He also has served on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Organic Standards Board and the National Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production. His farm has been featured in numerous publications, including National Geographic, Business Week, Audubon, and Gourmet magazine, for its diverse crop rotation and productivity without using synthetic inputs. His book, Cultivating an Ecological Conscience: Essays from a Farmer Philosopher, traces the evolution of his ecological and farming philosophy over the past 30 years.

Taylor Brorby

The editor of Fracture, Taylor Brorby is an award-winning essayist, poet and environmentalist. He is currently pursuing his masters of fine arts in Creative Writing and Environment at Iowa State University. His work has been featured on Minnesota Public Radio and North Dakota Public Radio and in numerous newspapers. A talented writer himself, he is currently working on two poetry collections, one related to the Bakken oil boom and the other about the Adirondacks in upstate New York, as well as an essay collection about western North Dakota.

Celebrate the Earth

Grinnell College will host a series of events throughout April and early May in celebration of Earth Month. The free, public events will be focused on local food, creativity, volunteering, and exploration.

The events will take place throughout the campus and city, with a focus toward "getting rooted in the community." Featured events include Fred Magdoff’s lecture “Capitalism and Agriculture” on April 11, the National Water Dance on April 16, and the Eco Fair on April 23.

Some events will take place off-campus at Arbor Lake Park and the Conard Environmental Research Area (CERA), including a lake cleanup and woodland wildflower hike. Free transportation is provided from Grinnell's campus to these events. RSVP to Elizabeth Hill  for transportation.

Calendar of Events

Local Food

Monday, April 11

Fred Magdoff

4 p.m. Noyce 1022 (Roundtable)

7:30 p.m. Joe Rosenfield ‘25 Center, Room 101 (Public Talk)

Fred Magdoff, Professor Emeritus of Soils at the University of Vermont, will give a roundtable on “Soil and Soil Health” and a public talk on “Capitalism and Agriculture.”

Saturday, April 16

Spring Fest

Noon-4 p.m. Ecohouse

Join Ecohouse members for a celebration of spring, local foods, music, and community. Explore Ecohouse’s environmental projects and take part in seed planting. Enjoy live music from student performers, springtime crafting, and more!

Wednesday, April 20

Richard Oppenlander

7:15 p.m. ARH Auditorium, Room 302

Consultant and researcher Richard Oppenlander, author of Food Choice and Sustainability, will guide the audience through a fact-filled journey of the food choice-animal agriculture-environment connection, revealing why humanity is currently on a path of pseudo-sustainability.

Friday, April 29

Food For Thought May Day Celebration

5-8:30 p.m. Cleveland Beach

Join members of Grinnell College’s Food For Thought group to celebrate early May Day. Bring a dish to the potluck and enjoy face-painting, music, and a discussion about campus food activism. Come and find out what Food For Thought is doing to increase the amount of “real food“ on campus!

Creativity

Saturday, April 16

National Water Dance

3 p.m. CERA

Join campus and community dancers and musicians in celebrating the importance of water in our lives.

Email Jan Graham to reserve transportation. Van leaves the Rosenfield Center drop-off zone at 2:15 p.m., and Mayflower Community at 2:25 p.m.. If driving on your own, meet at CERA’s Environmental Education Center at 2:50 p.m.

Monday, April 18

Site-Specific Studio Critique

1­–4 p.m. CERA

Join Professor Lee Emma Running and her Site Specific Studio class for the critique of their place-based art installations at CERA. Student art installations explore how we connect to the Iowa landscape.

Email Elizabeth Hill to reserve transportation

Wednesday, April 20

Ecohouse Movie Night

9 p.m. Bob’s Underground Café

Join Ecohouse members to watch The Secret Life of Plants, a 1979 documentary based on the book of the same name. The film features time-lapse photography of plants and fungi growing and an original score by musician Stevie Wonder.

Friday, April 22

20 Minutes @ 11: Culling the Herd

11 a.m. Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, Faulconer Gallery/Room 131

Explore our human relationship to white-tailed deer with Professor Lee Emma Running, who will present her recent project “Cure” in which she carves and gilds the bones of roadkill, and CERA Manager Elizabeth Hill, who will provide background on deer management in Iowa.

Learn

April 12 and 14

Undergraduate Research Symposium

11 a.m.-1 p.m. Rosenfield Center, various locations

Undergraduate research panel and poster presentations include many student talks on local and global environmental and food justice topics. Arrive at 11 a.m. to grab a free lunch and full presentation schedule.

Panel presentations in Rosenfield Center, Rooms 202, 203, 209, 225-227

Poster session in Rosenfield Center, Room 101

Tuesday, April 19

Fracture: Essays Poems, and Stories on Fracking in America

7:30 p.m. Rosenfield Center, Room 101

Join Taylor Brorby (ed.) and Iowa-based writers and thinkers Debra Marquart, Carolyn Raffensperger, and Frederick Kirschenmann for a book reading and question and answer session on the impacts of hydraulic fracturing (fracking).

Saturday, April 23

The Power is Ours!, Spiritual Reflections on Earth Day

12:30 p.m. Grinnell United Church of Christ

Join UCC members in welcoming Grinnell College faculty Liz Queathem and David Campbell, together with Associate Chaplain and Rabbi Rob Cabelli, who explore spiritual connections to Earth Day and climate change.

Thursday, April 28

Ecofeminist Organizing Workshop

4-5:30 p.m. ARH 102

Learn about inclusive organizing with two extraordinary activists! Join Bakken Resistance Pipeline Coalition co-founders and Women Food and Agriculture Network board members Ahna Kruzic and Dr. Angie Carter for a workshop on ecofeminist activism and organizing.

Explore

Saturday, April 23

Eco Fair

11 a.m.–1 p.m. Rosenfield Center, 1st floor and outdoor patio

SEC and Off-the-Grid students will present posters and demonstrations on topics pertaining to sustainable and off-the-grid living, including the tiny home movement, water sanitation and heating, backcountry camping tips, permaculture, urban gardening, and composting toilets.

Sunday, April 24

Arbor Lake Cleanup

2 p.m. Arbor Lake Park, 123 Pearl Street

Join IOWATER club in removing waste and beautifying Arbor Lake Park. Be prepared to get dirty, please wear rain boots and old clothes.

Email IOWATER to register.

Meet at GORP room in Harris Center or at Arbor Lake Park.

Tuesday, April 26

Woodland Wildflower Hike

4:15-6:15 p.m. CERA

Join CERA Manager Elizabeth Hill on a 1.5 mile spring ephemeral wildflower hike at CERA.

Wear sturdy walking shoes. Hike starts 4:45 p.m. at CERA.

Van leaves from Rosenfield Center drop-off zone at 4:15 p.m. Email Elizabeth Hill to reserve transportation

Saturday, May 7

Tallgrass Audubon Bird Banding

8 a.m.-noon Bob and Connie VanErsvelde’s house

Join members of the Tallgrass Audubon Society to learn about bird banding and the natural history of migratory birds. Families welcome!

Van leaves from Rosenfield Center drop-off zone

Email Elizabeth Hill for transportation or address

Event Sponsors

Center for Prairie Studies, CERA, Environmental Studies, Faulconer Gallery, Peace and Conflict Studies, Food for Thought, Iowater, Student Environmental Committee, Ecohouse, Poweshiek County SWCD, Advancing Animal Compassion Together, Student Government Association.

Swing into Spring Contra Dance

Grinnell College's Contra Dance club is holding its Second Annual Contra Dance at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, April 22. The free, public event will take place in Main Quad Dining Hall.

The dance will feature live music by Can I Get an Amen, one of Chicago's foremost folk bands. Nikki Herbst, a renowned contra dancer from Iowa, will be calling the social dances.

Contra dance is an American folk tradition, similar to square dancing. Fun for both skilled and beginner dancers, this live dance is a unique opportunity to experience one of America's folk traditions firsthand.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. You can request accommodations from Conference Operations and Events.

This event is supported by the Grinnell Department of Music with funds from the Terri Thaler ’82 Memorial Endowment.

Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity Symposium

The Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity Symposium will take place in the Joe Rosenfield ’25 Center and will feature the work of over 70 students.

Please come support the students as they present their papers, posters, readings, and performances.

Tuesday, April 12
11 a.m.-1 p.m., Poster Sessions and Panels, Rosenfield Center, various rooms
Wednesday, April 13
8 a.m.-4 p.m., Posters on display, Rosenfield Center, Room 101
Thursday, April 14
11 a.m.-1 p.m., Moderated panels, Rosenfield Center, various rooms

Detailed Symposium Schedule

April 11–14, 2016

Monday, April 11: Opening Reflections

7–9 p.m. Opening Reflections – Faulconer Gallery

Please join us as David Cook-Martin, Eliza Kempton, and Lee Running reflect on the value of research and creative work to their own scholarly pursuits, and then join us to view the Studio Art Faculty Exhibition and BAX: Bachelor of Arts Exhibition, a juried show featuring the work of third- and fourth-year students. These events will be followed by a dessert reception.

Tuesday, April 12: Poster Session and Moderated Panels

A light lunch is available in Rosenfield Center, Room 101

11 a.m.–1 p.m. Poster Session – Rosenfield Center, Room 101

  • Ana Karin Kozjek ’17
  • “Efficacies and Kinetics of Potential PET Ligand Agonists of α7 nAChR Differ”
  • Ian Dixon-Anderson ’17 and Thomas Robinson ’16
  • “Ionic Conductivities of Silyl and Carbonate Blend Electrolytes”
  • Michael Fitzpatrick ’16
  • “Morphological and Physiological Characterization of a Novel Subpopulation of Perisynaptic Schwann Cells”
  • Minna Montgomery ’16
  • “Synthetic Investigations Toward Biologically Active Derivatives of Polypeptide Macrolactones”
  • Nathan Kolacia ’16
  • “Synthesis and Characterization of Molybdenum(V) Imido Complexes with N-Salicylidene-2-Aminophenol”
  • Ryan Davis ’16
  • “Sex-Specific Antipredator Response to Auditory Cues in the Black Spiny- Tailed Iguana”
  • Helen Colliton ’16 and Maddy Pesch ’16
  • “Substituted Chalcones”
  • Peter Anderson ’16
  • “Police Use of Excessive Force Against People of Color in Baltimore”
  • Hannah Brown ’16
  • “Improving Clinical Trial Transparency”
  • Glorianne Dorce ’17
  • “Cuban Adjustment Act Reform”
  • Sophia Shin ’16
  • “Asian-American Mental Health Policy”
  • Sarina Farb ’16
  • “Setting Federal Nutrition Guidelines that Best Reflect Nutrition Science”
  • Jacob Ziontz ’16
  • “Effect of High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity on Spatial and Declarative Memory”
  • Maile Leathem-Rietz ’17
  • “CAFO in Poweshiek County, Iowa, Is a Reservoir for Carbenicillin Resistance Genes”
  • Caroline Graham ’16
  • “Marine Policy in the Arctic: Looking to the Future”
  • Deborah Msekela ’17
  • “Dissolved Organic Matter Sulfidization and Impact on HgS Bioavailability for Methylation”
  • Connor Mulligan ’17
  • “Organosilyl Electrolyte Conductivities, Lithium Transference Numbers, and Solvation Shells via PFG-STE NMR Diffusion Experiments and Their Application in Lithium-Ion Batteries”

11 a.m.–noon Studying Grinnell: Exploring Our Local Community – Rosenfield Center, Room 209

  • Sarah Henderson ’16
  • “Increasing Attendance at the Grinnell Historical Museum”
  • Samantha Snodgrass ’16
  • “Water and Landscape Management in Grinnell”
  • Summer Jones ’17
  • “Determining Students’ Postsecondary Plans: A Program Evaluation of the Tools Used by Grinnell High School’s Counseling Department”
  • Roselle Tenorio ’17
  • “Food Security Barriers for Rural Food Pantry Clients”

11 a.m.–noon Colonization and Hybridity – Rosenfield Center, Room 227

  • Aminata Kinana ’18 “Discourses on Mixity: How Identity and Difference Are Viewed in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania”
  • Willa Collins ’16 “Cult Classic: The Academy and Popular Religion in Colonial and Post-Renovation Vietnam”Sofia Mendez Subieta ’19 “Rethinking the Defeat of the Aztec Empire”
  • Rebecca Wong ’17 “Negotiating the Boundary Between Christianity and Filial Piety in Modern-Day Hong Kong”

11 a.m.–noon Culture, Confrontation, and Dislocations – Rosenfield Center, Room 226

  • Hening Zhang ’16
  • “A Search for Liberal Arts Studenthood in Modern China: Student Activism in Yenching University, 1918–1949”
  • Fangda Li ’16
  • “Through the Eyes of Shanghai Jewish Refugees: German, Austrian Jews in Shanghai”
  • Fenyi Wu ’17
  • “Red Amnesia: Responses to the Cultural Revolution in Contemporary Chinese Art”
  • Alyssa DeBella ’19
  • “Ritual Action and Social Spectacle: The Creation and Systematic Destruction of The Hunger Games”

11 a.m.–noon Interventions in Media Studies – Rosenfield Center, Room 225

  • Sophie Donlon ’16
  • “Confronting the Gaze: Reconfiguring Spectatorship in Untitled (Kitchen Table Series) by Carrie Mae Weems”
  • Lily Seibert ’19
  • “I Can’t Tell What’s Real Anymore: Paying the Price of Reality Television and Media”
  • Kai Vorhies ’19
  • “Capitol Whistleblowers: The Ethics of Mass Surveillance”
  • Meredith Carroll ’16
  • “The Marvelous and the Modern: Selling the Phonograph in Victorian London”

11 a.m.–noon Representations of Space and Time – Rosenfield Center, Room 202

  • Cameron Frank ’16
  • “Spatial Dependence in Newton-Cartan Gravity in Noninertial Reference Frames”
  • Jun Taek Lee ’18
  • “Randomness of Multifractal Systems”
  • Kaiqian Zhang ’17 and David Koychev ’16
  • “New Formulas from LU Matrix Decomposition”

Noon–1 p.m. Cognition, Meta-Cognition, and Knowledge – Rosenfield Center, Room 202

  • Lizzie Eason ’17
  • “Priming Epistem Stances”
  • Krista Matthews-Saugstad ’16
  • “Investigating Gestures”
  • Isabel Monaghan ’16
  • “Priming Epistem Stances”

Noon–1 p.m. Production, Consumption, and Capitalism: Across Time and Place – Rosenfield Center, Room 203

  • Rosemarie O’Brien ’16
  • “Chinese Art Today: Rural Aesthetics vs. Urban Commodities”
  • Jenny Samuels ’16
  • “Moral Capitalism and Democracy in the Third New Deal: Keynesian Fiscal Policy after the 1937–1938 Recession”
  • Mari Holmes ’17
  • “Analyzing the Multiplicity of Childhood and Who Gets Access”

Noon–1 p.m. Environmental Challenges and Responses – Rosenfield Center, Room 209

  • Jackson Dunnington ’16
  • “Cross-Temporal Analysis of Sociocultural Response to Drought in the American West”
  • Greg Margida ’16
  • “Racism of Climate Apathy”
  • Cassandra Miller ’16
  • “An Analysis of the 17th Karmapa as an Effective Environmentalist”

Wednesday, April 13 Posters on Display

8 a.m.–4 p.m. Posters on display – Rosenfield Center, Room 101

Thursday, April 14 Moderated Panels

A light lunch is available outside Rosenfield Center, Room 209

11 a.m.–noon Performances – Rosenfield Center, Room 101

  • Ivy Kuhn ’16
  • “The National Water Dance: Somatic and Site-Specific Dance-Making”
  • Alexandra Barnard ’17
  • “I Dream Before I Take the Stand”
  • Aaron Israel Levin ’17
  • “Brass Quintet”

11 a.m.–noon Women of Color Negotiating Agency and Representation – Rosenfield Center, Room 225

  • Alexandra Odom ’16
  • “Perceptions of Impact Among African American Women in the Civil Rights Movement”
  • Jocelyn Acosta ’16
  • “Race, Class, and Sex Work”
  • Jermaine Stewart-Webb ’16
  • “Discussing Black Female Sexuality with Private Letters: The Nellie McKay and Nell Irvin Painter Correspondence”

11 a.m.–noon Education and Pedagogy – Rosenfield Center, Room 226

  • Carlina Arango ’16
  • “An Evaluation of Al Exito’s Impact on Participants in the Program’s First Three Years (2006–09)”
  • Paulina Campbell ’16
  • “Pedagogy and Social Change”
  • Katherine Tucker ’16
  • “The Gendered Nature of Social Class: How Intersecting Identities Inform College Students’ Plans for Relationship and Family Formation”

11 a.m.–noon Explorations in the Digital Humanities – Rosenfield Center, Room 227

  • Emily Hackman ’16
  • “Civil War Memory and GIS”
  • Paige Wheeler ’16 and Julia Marquez-Uppman ’17
  • “Blood vs. Love: Power in Early Modern Spain”
  • Noah Schlager ’16
  • “Digital Amanas”

Noon–1 p.m. Novella Readings – Rosenfield Center, Room 101

  • Hannah Condon ’16 River Valley Natives
  • Emma Thomasch ’16 Where We Go From Here
  • Leo Abbe-Schneider ’16 French Rollins
  • Phoebe Mogharei ’16 Careless
  • Grace Lloyd ’16 Saccharine

Noon–1 p.m. Individuals and Nations – Rosenfield Center, Room 203

  • Lauren Yi ’18
  • “The Religion of Victimhood in North Korea: How Juche Ideology Shaped a New Nation”
  • Dhruv Gupta ’17
  • “Variables Underlying Trust in Nation-States”
  • Colleen Moser ’16
  • “West African Communities in France: Contemporary Challenges for Malian Village Associations and Transnational Development”

Noon–1 p.m. Surveying Sex at Grinnell College – Rosenfield Center, Room 209

  • Melissa Melloy ’16
  • “Love for One or Love for All: Polyamory at Grinnell College”
  • Mara Rosenberg ’17
  • “Queering High Street: Investigating Strategies for Same-Sex Hookups at Grinnell College”
  • Elaina Notman ’16
  • “Preference for Intoxication in Consensual Sexual Encounters”

Noon–1 p.m. Intimate Surfaces: Troubling the High/Low Divide – Rosenfield Center, Room 202

  • Eliza Harrison ’16
  • “Early Sonia Delaunay: The Avant-Garde at Home”
  • Lauren Roush ’16
  • “Fabric Portraits”
  • Mai Pham ’16
  • “Traces of Pop in Dinh Q. Lê’s Art”

Sponsored by the Office of the Dean of the College.

The dean’s office wishes to thank Vance Byrd, Jennifer Dobe, Andrew Graham, Jan Graham, Kelly Maynard, Casey Oberlin, Terri Phipps, Andi Tracy ’99, Tilly Woodward, and the Dining Services staff for their assistance in organizing this symposium.

If you require an accommodation in order to attend or fully participate in any of these events please contact Maria Tapias or the coordinator of disability resources, Autumn Wilke, or call 641-269-3702.

The National Water Dance Comes to Grinnell

Ivy Kuhn ’16 and an ensemble will perform a dance as part of the National Water Dance project at 3 p.m. on Saturday, April 16. Kuhn organized the event and choreographed the community-dance project as part of a Mentored Advanced Project with Celeste Miller, assistant professor of theatre and dance.

Kuhn's performance, which will feature the Tai Chi Women's Group, Grinnell Community Ensemble, and Pioneer String Quartet, will take place at the College's Conard Environmental Research Area (CERA). Sponsored by the Center for Prairie Studies, it is free and open to the public.

The performance at CERA is one of more than 100 National Water Dance sites around the nation that will join together April 16 for a simultaneous event to bring awareness to the pressing issues of water. This event will be live-streamed on the National Water Dance website

National Water Dance is an organization that creates opportunities for dancers of all ages to experience the power of art and performance as a vehicle for social change by collaborating on the formation of a nationwide movement choir.

“Water is so obviously precious to human life — and to all life — that we shouldn’t need a dance to make us realize it. But this dance is taking place at locations all around the country on the same day and at the same time as a statement that we need to achieve an even more profound realization,” said Jon Andelson ’70, Rosenfield professor of science – anthropology and director of the Center for Prairie Studies. 

Each site of the National Water Dance project features a dance that is specifically choreographed to reflect a local water issue.

“I centered my choreography,” Kuhn said, “on the sensory elements of the prairie playing with the imagery of the extensive roots, gravity and sinking, the exchange between breath and contact, in contrast to the internal and external sense of water's fluidity and ability to flood and alter when there is nothing holding it in place.”

Audience participation will be invited at the April 16 event at CERA. “If you can move,” Andelson said, “you can participate in this dance.”

Those interested in participating in the dance are encouraged to attend one of the following workshops, which are open to all ages with no dance experience required:

  • Saturday, April 9, 10:30-11:30 a.m., North Room of the Grinnell Arts Center, 926 Broad St.
  • Saturday, April 9, 1-2 p.m., Caulkins Community Room at the Drake Community Library, 930 Park St.
  • Sunday, April 10, 3:30-4:30 p.m., room 209 of Grinnell College's Joe Rosenfield '25 Center, 1115 Eighth Ave.
  • Tuesday, April 12, 2-3 p.m., Carmen Center, Mayflower Community, 616 Broad St.

Free, round-trip bus transportation to CERA on April 16 will be provided at 2:15 p.m. at the Rosenfield Center. Reservations can be made by contacting Jan Graham, 641-269-4384, by noon, Tuesday, April 13.

To drive to CERA, take Interstate-80 west from Grinnell to Exit 173. Go north on Highway 224 and turn right on the first gravel road (South 12th Avenue East), following it east about 1.5 miles to the main entrance of CERA.

Scholars' Convo: Bestselling Author Roxane Gay

Roxane GayRoxane Gay, a 2014 New York Times bestselling author and feminist scholar, will give a free public reading at  11 a.m. Thursday, April 7 in Joe Rosenfield '25 Center, Room 101.. Her novels and essays have attracted international acclaim for their treatment of complex issues such as gender inequality, sexual violence, institutional racism and body image.

An accomplished scholar, Gay is an associate professor of English at Purdue University in Indiana. Her research interests include the intersections between race, gender, and popular culture, contemporary fiction, and the political novel.

Gay uses her personal experience with race, gender identity and sexuality to inform her analyses and deconstruction of feminist and racial issues in her work. In addition to her more serious scholarly and creative work, she is a well-known figure on social media, with tens of thousands of Twitter followers, many of whom are drawn to her often irreverent and humorous "instant" commentaries on major news events, politics, pop culture, and reality television.

Bad Feminist, her bestselling essay collection, is a personal manifesto that takes readers through the journey of Gay's evolution as a woman of color and describes how feminism affects Gay's own life — for better or worse. The essays cover a wide a range of topics, from competitive Scrabble to novels written by women to advice on acknowledging privilege.

Gay's writings on gender and racial inequality have won numerous awards in recent years and have appeared in Tin House, Oxford American, The New York Times Book Review, Bookforum, Time, The Los Angeles Times, The Nation, The Rumpus, Salon, and many other media outlets.

Gay's debut novel, Untamed State, explores the privilege that made Haitian-American Mireille Duval Jameson a target for kidnapping and the strength she must draw on to survive the kidnapping and reclaim her life. Deadline.com recently reported that the novel will be adapted for film by Beyond the Lights director Gina Prince-Bythewood. Gay is co-writing the script with Prince-Bythewood. Gugu Mbatha-Raw has been selected to portray Jameson.

Gay's latest book, Hunger, is scheduled to be released in June. Hunger focuses on Gay's experience with weight, body image, and building a positive relationship with food.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. Rosenfield Center has accessible parking in the lot to the east. Room 101 is equipped with an induction hearing loop system.  You can request accommodations from Conference Operations and Events.

 

Total Health from the Ground Up

Daphne MillerDr. Daphne Miller, a family physician, writer, and associate professor of family medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, will discuss “Farmacology: Total Health from the Ground Up” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 10, in Joe Rosenfield '25 Center, Room 101.

She will also lead a roundtable discussion about health professions, alternative medicine, and diet at 4 p.m.  in Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, Room 152. Both events are free and open to the public.

Miller will use her latest book, Farmacology: What Innovative Family Farming Can Teach Us About Health and Healing, to frame her discussion of family farms. Her lecture will cover all the aspects of farming — from seed choice to soil management — that have a direct and powerful impact on health.

Bridging the traditional divide between agriculture and medicine, Miller will share lessons learned from inspiring farmers and biomedical researchers as she weaves their insights and discoveries, along with stories from her patients, into the narrative.

A practicing family physician, Miller is also a leading scholar on health ecology. Her writings in the field have been published in The Washington Post, The New York Times, Vogue, Orion Magazine, Yes! Magazine, Food and Wine, The Guardian, and Harvard Medical Magazine.

Miller has received numerous honors for her achievements in health ecology, including fellowships at the University of California San Francisco, funded by the National Institute of Health, and at the Berkeley Food Institute. She also serves on the boards of a number of non-profits, including Institute of the Golden Gate, Education Outside, Mandela Marketplace, and the Edible Schoolyard Foundation.

Sponsoring this event are the Grinnell College Office of the President; Center for Prairie Studies; Rosenfield Program in Public Affairs, International Relations, and Human Rights; Office of Community Enhancement and Engagement; Wellness Program; Chaplain’s Office; Student Environmental Committee; and the Student Government Association.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. Rosenfield Center has accessible parking in the lot to the east. Room 101 is equipped with an induction hearing loop system.  You can request accommodations from the event sponsor or Conference Operations and Events.

Audre Lorde: The Berlin Years and Artists' Coffeehouse

A free, public screening of the documentary Audre Lorde: The Berlin Years 1984-1992 will take place at 2 p.m. Sunday, March 6, in Alumni Recitation Hall, Room 102.

The film focuses on Audre Lorde’s relation to the German Black Diaspora as well as her literary and political influence. It is a unique visual document about the times the author spent in Germany.

Audre Lorde tells about the development of an Afro-German movement and the origins of the anti-racist movement before and after the German reunification. It describes the beginnings of these political debates and facilitates a historical analysis and an understanding of present debates on identity and racism in Germany.

For the first time, Dagmar Schultz’s archival video and audio recordings and footage has been made available to a wide public. The film represents an important addition to the documentary A Litany for Survival: The Life and Work of Audre Lorde by Ada Gray Griffin and Michelle Parkerson, which was screened at the 45th Berlin Film Festival in 1995.

Following the film, students are encouraged to share their poetry, short stories, and other talents with the group in an Artists' Coffeehouse Showcase to honor the legacy of Lorde and her work.

Light refreshments will be served.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. You can request accommodations from the event sponsor or Conference Operations and Events.

The screening and coffeehouse are sponsored by the Cultural Films Committee, Intercultural Affairs, and the German, American Studies, and Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies departments.

The Literary Prehistory of Virtual Reality

Michael Saler headshotMichael Saler, professor of history at the University of California, Davis, will discuss the prehistory of imaginary worlds in fantasy and science fiction as a source of modern enchantment when he speaks at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 2, in Joe Rosenfield '25 Center, Room 101.

Saler's free, public lecture is titled "The Literary Prehistory of Virtual Reality: Modern Imaginary Worlds as Sites of Creativity."

"Professor Saler will speak about imaginary worlds as sites of creativity that encourage both escapism and social engagement. His talk will be of broad interest to historians and students of culture, fantasy and modernity," said Shuchi Kapila, professor of English and director of the Center for the Humanities.

"In our contemporary world," she added, "millions of people of all ages inhabit imaginary worlds, as we can see from the popularity of books and movies about Harry Potter and Sherlock Holmes, as well as The Lord of the Rings fantasy novel and film trilogy. Prof. Saler will discuss why this interest in fantasy is more than mere escape."

The College’s Center for the Humanities — which is engaged in a year-long exploration of the theme of Sites of Creativity: Streets, Salons, Studios, and Schools — is sponsoring Saler’s talk.

Saler is an accomplished scholar of modern European intellectual history and the author of The Avant-Garde in Interwar England: 'Medieval Modernism' and the London Underground and As If: Modern Enchantment and the Literary Prehistory of Virtual Reality. He also writes for The Times Literary Supplement, The Nation, The Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. Rosenfield Center has accessible parking in the lot to the east. Room 101 is equipped with an induction hearing loop system.  You can request accommodations from the event sponsor or Conference Operations and Events.

So You Think You Can Write

Grinnell alumni return to campus for a two-day symposium on written communication Friday and Saturday, Feb. 19 and 20, 2016.

The free, public symposium features informational panels, writing challenges, an internship and information fair, and plenty of opportunities to talk directly with successful alumni in the field.

Schedule

Friday, Feb. 19

4 p.m. Freelance Writing Panel
Tequia Burt ’98, Courtney Sherwood ’00, and Molly McArdle ’09
Alumni Recitation Hall, Room 302
5:30 p.m. Dinner (Open only to those who preregistered by Feb. 12)
Rosenfield Center, Room 101

Saturday, Feb. 20

10 a.m. Writing Challenge Events
Students can take part in writing challenges judged by
Christa Desir ’96 and Katie In ’13.
Rosenfield Center, Room 101
12:30 p.m. Lunch With Alumni
Rosenfield Center Marketplace,
Rooms 224 A and B
2 p.m. Writing Careers: Years in the Making Panel
Dan Weeks ’80, Jeanne Pinder ’75, Jim Bickal ’82, and Molly Backes ’02
Rosenfield Center, Room 101
3:30 p.m. Internship and Information Fair
Speak one-on-one with our guest alumni.
Bucksbaum Center for the Arts rotunda
5 p.m. Networking Hour with Alumni
Refreshments will be served.
Rosenfield Center, second floor lobby
6 p.m. Dinner (Open only to those who preregistered by Feb. 12)
Rosenfield Center, Room 101

Guest Alumni Panelists

M. Molly Backes ’02

M. Molly Backes ’02 is the author of the young adult novel The Princesses of Iowa (Candlewick Press, 2012), which was named Chicago Public Library’s Best of the Best Fiction for Teens (2013) and Forever Young Adult’s Best YA Books of 2012 and was a finalist on NPR.org’s Best-Ever Teen Novels list in 2012. She has performed her personal essays at reading series including Essay Fiesta, Funny Ha-Ha, Is This a Thing?, and Sunday Salon and is a frequent guest at writing conferences and festivals across the country. Since graduating from Grinnell, Backes has had a number of careers, including middle school English teacher, wildlife conservation educator, arts administrator, marketing department copy writer/editor, and writing coach. She is currently an M.F.A. candidate at Iowa State University, where she teaches composition and creative writing.

Jim Bickal ’82

Jim Bickal ’82 began his career in 1984 as an unpaid intern for Minnesota Public Radio News. He has worked as a reporter and producer for MPR and Twin Cities Public Television. Some of the stories he has covered include the Minnesota Twins’ improbable 1987 World Series championship, the election of Jesse Ventura as governor of Minnesota in 1998, the 2002 Minnesota Senate campaign after the death of Paul Wellstone, and the I-35W bridge collapse in 2007. He has produced two hour-long radio documentaries. One traces a song (“The Rock Island Line” by Little Richard) to its origins, and the other looks at how growing up in Minnesota shaped Bob Dylan’s music. He is currently developing a podcast centered around the events of May 10, 2013. That’s when an unarmed man fleeing arrest broke into Bickal’s home in Minneapolis and was killed by police officers in his basement.

Tequia Burt ’98

Tequia Burt ’98 is a veteran editor and writer with more than 10 years of experience covering marketing, business, media and government. Before becoming a freelancer last year, she was editor in chief of FierceCMO. Burt earned her M.S.J. from Medill in 2005.

Christa Soule Desir ’96

Christa Soule Desir ’96 writes contemporary fiction for young adults. Her novels include Fault Line, Bleed Like Me, and Other Broken Things. She lives with her husband, three children, and overly enthusiastic dog outside Chicago. She is a founding member of the Voices and Faces Project, a nonprofit organization for rape survivors that conducts an international survivor-based testimonial writing workshop, including working with incarcerated teens. She also works as a romance editor at Samhain Publishing and once a week can be found working the stacks at Anderson’s Bookshop.

Katie In ’13

Katie In ’13 is an interdisciplinary media artist and musician based in Grinnell. She graduated from Grinnell College in 2013 with a B.A. in sociology and was a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow and recipient of the Ladies Education Society Award. A socially-minded observer of the world and creator of things, In uses video, music, and performance to tell stories and communicate ideas. She is part of the collaborative group Tiny Circus as well as the Midwest-based collective and band called The Plain Mosaic.

Molly McArdle ’09

Molly McArdle ’09 is Brooklyn Magazine’s books editor and a regular contributor to Travel + Leisure. She’s also founding editor of The Rumpus’ Tumblr (The Rumblr) and the creator of The Daily GIF. Her essays, criticism, and reporting have appeared in The Believer, the Los Angeles Review of Books, BuzzFeed, The Rumpus, Atlas Obscura, Bitch Magazine, Pacific Standard, Audubon Magazine, The Oyster Review, Fusion, and Library Journal, where she was an editor on the book review. She was a member of Grinnell’s first D.C. Posse and is working on a novel.

Jeanne Pinder ’75

Jeanne Pinder ’75 is founder and CEO of ClearHealthCosts.com, a New York City journalism startup bringing transparency to the health care marketplace by telling people what stuff costs. She founded ClearHealthCosts after volunteering for a buyout in 2009 from The New York Times, where she worked for almost 25 years as an editor, reporter and human resources executive. Pinder is a fellow at the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University. She was born and raised in Grinnell. She started working as a journalist in middle school at The Grinnell Herald-Register, her family’s twice-weekly independent paper. Before The Times, she also worked at The Des Moines Register and The Associated Press. She is a graduate of Grinnell College with a bachelor’s in Russian and studied Slavic linguistics in graduate school at Indiana University. She used to teach Russian, and she lived for a time in what was then the Soviet Union.

Courtney Sherwood ’00

Courtney Sherwood ’00 worked in newspapers for 12 years, first as a reporter then as an editor, before frustrations with the shrinking print industry prompted her to quit her day job to freelance in 2012. She continues to cover hard news from Portland, Ore., with pieces appearing in a wide range of outlets, including Science magazine online, Vice, The Irish Times, the Canadian Broadcast Corp., and many others. Most of her time is divided between NPR-affiliate Oregon Public Broadcasting, where she is a radio editor and web producer; Thompson Reuters, a news service for which she is one of two Oregon correspondents; and The Lund Report, which publishes her wonky analyses of how money moves the health care industry.

Dan Weeks ’80

Dan Weeks ’80 majored in American Studies at Grinnell and earned an M.A. in nonfiction writing from the University of Iowa Graduate Writing Program. He has spent the past  30-plus years as a magazine and book writer, photographer, editor, ghostwriter, editorial manager, publishing consultant, and freelancer. His magazine profiles, features, essays, and photographs on subjects ranging from adventure travel to zinnias have appeared in dozens of national, international, and regional magazines. His book Deadliest Catch: Desperate Hours, a companion to the Emmy-nominated reality show about Bering Sea crab fishermen, was a Discovery Channel best seller. He edited The Grinnell Magazine from 2010–2013 and currently edits The Iowan magazine.