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Start by Asking Questions

Asking questions is fundamental to the collecting and understanding of art, particularly contemporary art. That's why the Faulconer Gallery titled its fall opening exhibition "Start by Asking Questions: Contemporary Art from the Faulconer and Rachofsky Collections, Dallas."

With works by Janine Antoni, Eric Fischl, Mark Grotjahn, William Kentridge, Sigmar Polke, Yinka Shonibare, Kara Walker and others, "Start by Asking Questions" excites the mind and the senses with many provocative questions, says Lesley Wright, curator of the exhibition and director of the Faulconer Gallery.

"Some of the questions we expect our visitors to ask are:

  • How do I approach this object that doesn't fit my expectation of what art looks like?
  • What do I do with difficult feelings raised by the subject of this piece?
  • Why are these two or four objects in the same space?
  • Where do I even start?

Through our programming, our tours, and our educational materials, we hope people will ask these questions (and more) and begin to shape some answers."

The exhibition, which opens Friday, Sept. 18, brings 46 works to Grinnell College from two couples who are considered among the most adventurous collectors in the contemporary art world.

Vernon E. (’61) and Amy Hamamoto (’59) Faulconer have long supported the Faulconer Gallery, and their friends Howard and Cindy Rachofsky were named one of the top 200 art collectors in the summer issue of Artnews magazine.

Their art fills their homes and The Warehouse, a private collection space in Dallas, Texas, committed to exhibiting 20th- and 21st-century art, and to educating a diverse audience of students, teachers, and arts enthusiasts by encouraging them to deepen their engagement by asking questions of the art.

Although Vernon Faulconer, a life trustee of Grinnell College, died unexpectedly in Dallas on Aug. 7, his family decided to go ahead with the exhibition.

Amy Hamamoto Faulconer and Howard Rachofsky will attend the opening reception from 5–6:30 p.m. Sept. 18 at the Faulconer Gallery.

Preceding the reception from 4 to 5 p.m. will be a discussion titled "Collecting Art with Vernon: A Remembrance." Rachofsky and Wright will talk about Vernon Faulconer as an art patron and explore the world of art collecting and the role of private contemporary art spaces.

The "Collecting Art with Vernon" event and the opening reception are free and open to the public, as is the exhibition, which runs through Dec. 13. The Faulconer Gallery, closed for installation, reopens Sept. 18. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily except for Thanksgiving, when the gallery is closed.

Programs and Events

The exhibition includes a variety of public programs and events, including musical performances. Faulconer Gallery has a complete list of events. Highlights include:

Gallery Talk, Sept. 21, 8 p.m.

(originally scheduled for 4 p.m.)

Artist John Gerrard will talk about his research into petroleum, the Dust Bowl and nitrogen in conjunction with his art created between 2007 and 2014. His piece, "Grow Finish Unit," is featured in "Start by Asking Questions." 

Gerrard works with virtual reality, creating astonishingly real but entirely and meticulously time-based images, fabricated by the artist and his studio based on documentation of the agri-industrial landscapes of the American Great Plains. Co-sponsored by Artists@Grinnell.

Writers @Grinnell, Oct. 8, 8 p.m.

"If the Music is Too Loud You are Too Old — A Conversation with Grinnell College graduate Edward Hirsch about Poetry, Parenting, Disability and Grief." Hirsch (’75), whose poem "Gabriel," a long elegy for his son, was published in The New Yorker magazine and featured on NPR, is president of the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, and author of eight books of poems and five books of prose. Co-sponsored by Writers@Grinnell

Roundtable: A Conversation on "Emancipation Approximation," Nov. 17, 4 p.m.

Kara Walker's "Emancipation Approximation" (27 prints) explores the disconnect between the ideals of the Emancipation Proclamation (1863) and the people it was meant to serve, with ongoing implications in our current society.

Walker's art provides the catalyst for a conversation about political and social change. Panelists include:

  • Shanna Benjamin, associate professor of English;
  • Lakesia Johnson, associate dean, chief diversity officer and associate professor of gender, women's and sexuality studies;
  • Sarah Purcell, professor of history; and
  • Leslie Turner, assistant dean of students and director of intercultural affairs.

Gallery Talk: The Public/Private Museum, Nov. 24, 4 p.m.

Gilbert Vicario, former senior curator at the Des Moines Art Center, will explore how collecting by public institutions and private individuals has changed the way we experience contemporary art.

Community Day, Dec. 5, 1:30-3 p.m.

Community members of all ages are invited to visit the Faulconer Gallery for a fun afternoon of art and hands-on activities, plus a tour of "Start by Asking Questions." Funding provided by Shane and Lauren Jacobson.

Gallery + Students = Alternative Classroom

The Faulconer Gallery’s thought-provoking art exhibitions benefit more than the casual visitor. Students in courses across science, social studies, and humanities disciplines find that the Faulconer is more than just an art gallery — it’s an extension of the classroom. 

Gallery as biology lab 

“One of the reasons I do art that incorporates biology is the wonder aspect,” says Becky Garner ’15, who took Professor Jackie Brown’s History of Biology course.  

Brown has long been interested in the intersection between art and science. Last year he incorporated From Wunderkammer to the Modern Museum, 1606-1884, a Faulconer Gallery exhibition of books documenting cabinets of curiosity, into his History of Biology course. The exhibition demonstrated the change in scientific thinking over the course of nearly 300 years. Connected to the exhibition, there was a panel discussion of the role of wonder in scientific inquiry.  

Brown has also incorporated the gallery into his First-Year Tutorial. “Lesley Wright, director of the gallery, leads a close looking exercise,” says Brown. It’s a way of teaching students how to examine things closely without going as far as interpretation. Brown’s tutorial performs the exercise in different settings ranging from looking at an animal to looking at art. 

Gallery as race and gender studies classroom 

Last year, Professor Michael Gill incorporated a student-curated exhibition, Decay: The Ephemeral Body in Art, into his Feminist and Queer Disability Studies course. This year, he structured an advanced special topic course on masculinity around an exhibition at the gallery, Gordon Parks: The Making of an Argument. This exhibition showed how Time magazine shaped a photo essay by Parks to fit a particular narrative of black masculinity.  

“The cropping and lighting choices made a specific judgment of Red Jackson, the subject of the photo essay, and flattened his expression of gender for a white audience,” says Gill. Gill’s students responded to the exhibition by creating their own as a final project for the class.  

Gallery as education seminar 

Professor Kathryn Wegner took her students to both the Faulconer Gallery and the gallery in Burling Library to view two Chicago-related exhibitions. Students reacted to the narrative construction of Gordon Parks: The Making of an Argument and spent time studying Sandra Steinbrecher’s The Education Project Photo Exhibition. The latter was a photographic study of three struggling Chicago high schools. In addition to images and stories of teachers and students, it also profiled journalists, activists, and politicians. Wegner constructed the syllabus for her course on education reform around both the Steinbrecher exhibition and a number of speakers brought to campus by a Rosenfield symposium.   

“We are always seeking ways to make works in our collection and in the gallery a dynamic part of the learning process,” says Wright. “And we work with artists, critics, and scholars — as well as faculty and other on-campus experts — to create a richer context for our exhibitions.”

 

Open to Interpretation

Grinnell College's Faulconer Gallery collection is filled with intriguing and curious works of art, which can be enjoyed or interpreted in many different ways.

The gallery's new exhibition, "Open to Interpretation," brings together 35 such works and asks visitors to provide comments and captions, selections of which will be shared for others to enjoy and ponder.

"Open to Interpretation" is curated by Tilly Woodard, curator of academic and community outreach, and Lesley Wright, director of the Faulconer Gallery. They selected 35 works from the gallery's art collection, including paintings, prints, and sculptures dating from the 1600s through the 2000s.

"With this exhibition, we invite visitors to collaborate with us, offering insights, facts, stories and conjectures about any piece that moves them," Woodward and Wright said in a statement. "We will share some of what we gather in our wall texts, and all that we gather in binders around the gallery. We will continually update both the binders and the selections on the walls.

"Through words and pictures contributed by our visitors, we hope individuals will see a piece differently, laugh aloud, stir an emotion, or ask more questions," they added. "Art should never be static, with just one fixed meaning. We hope that by inviting visitors to share and enjoy many interpretations, they will be open to the art and to making it their own."

The gallery already has collected some visitors' musings about a number of the works, including a Philippine grave marker in form of "Ship of the Dead," created by an unknown artist.

"We all think about death," wrote Tanner Alger, a student at Grinnell Middle School. "What will happen? Where will I go? I think for some cultures this boat might be the answer. It will carry you to wherever we will go, like the boats of Ra, the Egyptian sun god. But this is the Philippine way to the afterlife." 

Students from the Grinnell College Preschool also studied the marker and then collaborated to create the following story about it. 

"Mice are sailing on a stormy day. They fall off into the water, so they made a boat out of paper so they could get back on their wooden boat. Then they are playing pirates. The pirates come and find the mice. They didn't know that people were on the boat, too. The people were pirates trying to get the rats off. The pirates caught the mice in the net. The pirates ate the rats. And then the rats came out and turned into squirrels.

"The pirates fell off the boat; they couldn't swim so they sank to the bottom. The mice cheered! The pirates were never seen again. There was a restaurant on the boat where the mice could eat cheese. There was a party at the restaurant and everybody cheered."

"Open to Interpretation" will continue through Sunday, Aug. 2, in the Faulconer Gallery, Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, 1108 Park Ave., Grinnell. The exhibition is free and open to the public daily from 11 a.m. through 5 p.m.

For more information about exhibitions and related programs, contact the Faulconer Gallery, 641-269-4660. The gallery is accessible. Accommodation requests may be made to Conference Operations, 641-269-3235.

Faulconer Gallery Unveils Bequest of Works by Toulouse-Lautrec and Others

Saxoleine, poster by Jules Cheret, 1896

Jules Cheret, Saxoleine Pétrole de Sureté, 1896

Grinnell College's Faulconer Gallery has received a bequest of 14 posters and lithographs by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Pierre Bonnard, and others from the estate of William M. Moore. The collection is named The Lenny Seidenman Collection, Bequest of William M. Moore, in memory of Nina Seidenman ’71. It honors both Moore’s deceased wife, who attended Grinnell College for two years and remembered her time with great pride, and his father-in-law, Lenny Seidenman, who collected the art while doing Jewish relief work in Paris just after World War II.

The collection includes:

  • Three posters, including the iconic Divan Japonais, and seven lithographs by Toulouse-Lautrec
  • A poster by Bonnard
  • Three posters by Jules Chéret
  • A large theatrical poster by Bécon.  

The works are now on view in the Print and Drawing Study Room on the lower level of Burling Library.

In making the offer of the collection, Moore wrote: “It has fallen to me to try to keep the collection intact by finding an eventual home for it, somewhere that would appreciate these incredible images when I am no longer able to enjoy them….”  The quality of the works and the connection with a Grinnell alumna, along with the family’s deep connection to education, made this bequest a wonderful addition to the Faulconer Gallery art collection.

Both Moore and Seidenman taught at Milton Academy, a private school in Milton, Massachusetts. Moore was raised in Vermont and Seidenman grew up in Europe, where her father was executive vice-president of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, working in France, Italy, and other countries to relocate Jewish refugees.

“The Lenny Seidenman Collection adds wonderful posters and prints from the late nineteenth century to our works on paper collection. These posters and prints will be of interest to students and faculty in art, French, theatre, history, gender and women’s studies, and to our wider audience,” says Faulconer Gallery director Lesley Wright. “Moore first approached us about adding the bequest to his will in 2013; we are only sorry that he passed away shortly after we met — much sooner than we expected. We are honored to have the collection at Grinnell.”

The Print and Drawing Study Room is open Monday to Friday from 1–5 p.m.

Against Reason: Anti/Enlightenment Prints

“Against Reason: Anti/Enlightenment Prints by Callot, Hogarth, Piranesi and Goya,” an art exhibition exploring the darker side of the Enlightenment, also known as the Age of Reason, opens Friday, April 3, at the Faulconer Gallery, Bucksbaum Center for the Arts.

Beginning in the mid-seventeenth century, Enlightenment thinkers in Britain, France, and elsewhere in Europe began to question religious and political authority, embracing the notion that humanity could be improved through critical reasoning. The Enlightenment produced scientific discoveries, legislative reform, pioneering philosophical texts, wars, and revolutions. It also supported the institution of slavery. 

Featuring prints by Jacques Callot, William Hogarth, Giovanni Battista Piranesi and Francisco de Goya y Lucientes, "Against Reason" examines the dangers of secularism, nationalism and a scientific method that dismisses rather than exalts the qualities that make us both human and humane.

The exhibition, which is free and open to the public, was curated by Timothy McCall ’15, Maria Shevelkina ’15, Dana Sly ’15, Emma Vale ’15, Elizabeth Allen ’16, Mai Pham ’16, and Hannah Storch ’16. The students worked under the direction of J. Vanessa Lyon, assistant professor of art history, during a fall 2014 exhibition seminar.

"With Good Reason: Conversations, Celebration and Music" will be held at Faulconer Gallery at 4:15 p.m. Friday, April 17, featuring the opportunity to speak with student curators and hear music from the Enlightenment period. Faculty members from the departments of philosophy, English, and French will join student curators in a roundtable discussion on the themes of the exhibition at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday, April 28, at the gallery.

"Against Reason" will be on view through Sunday, Aug. 2. The Faulconer Gallery is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. This exhibition includes a loan of four prints from Legacies for Iowa: A University of Iowa Museum of Art Collections Sharing Project, supported by the Matthew Bucksbaum Family.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. Bucksbaum Center for the Arts has accessible parking in a lot behind the building just north of Sixth Ave. Accommodation requests may be made to Conference Operations.

 

BAX Student Exhibition

The Bachelor of Arts Exhibition (BAX), which features works in the creative arts by students at Grinnell College, will open with a reception at 4:15 p.m. Friday, April 10, at the Faulconer Gallery, Bucksbaum Center for the Arts.

BAX is an exhibition of works by advanced art students. This year, the exhibition will feature works by 26 students. Though many of this year's artists major in studio art, some are pursuing an additional major such as anthropology or computer science. Other majors represented include English, theatre, and biological chemistry. Works on view include painting, drawing, sculpture, ceramics, mixed media, and installations.

Students on the art and art history department's student educational policy committee organize the exhibition. This year's organizers are Becky Garner ’15, Eden Marek ’15, Maria Shevelkina ’15, David Cambronero-Sanchez ’16, Hannah Condon ’16, Eliza Harrison ’16, Glenys Hunt ’16, Hazel Batrezchavez ’17, Xena Fitzgerald ’17, and Lauren Roush ’17. The organizers designed a catalog to accompany the exhibition.

The exhibition is designed by Faulconer Gallery director of exhibition design Milton Severe and coordinated by director Lesley Wright. The exhibition is adjudicated by artist in residence Laleh Khorramian, a visual artist from New York with extensive experience in painting, drawing, animation and digital media. Khorramian will select most of the yearly prizes in studio art, which will be announced at the opening reception.

The exhibition will be on view through May 3. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week, and admission is free.

Artists/Writers@Grinnell: Dan O’Brien

Dan O'BrienAward-winning poet and playwright Dan O’Brien will be in residence March 1–7 and April 16–19, sponsored by Writers@Grinnell and Artists@Grinnell.

O’Brien is giving a free public works in progress talk about his creative process at 4:15 p.m. Thursday, March 5, in Faulconer Gallery.

His plays include The Body of an American, winner of the Horton Foote Prize for Outstanding New American Play, the PEN Center USA Award for Drama, and other awards. His poetry collections include Scarsdale and War Reporter.

In March, O’Brien is teaching an English and theatre short intensive course on the creation of a one-act play. Students of the course are learning the fundamentals of dramatic structure and will write, rehearse, and present their own completed one-acts during his second visit in April.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. You can request accommodations from the event sponsor or Conference Operations.

Artists@Grinnell: Stelios Manousakis

Artists@Grinnell welcomes artist-in-residence Stelios Manousakis for a two-week residency February 15–28, 2015.

Stelios Manousakis (Crete, Greece, 1980) is a composer, performer, sound artist, and researcher. He operates across the convergence zones of art, science, and engineering / composition, performance, and installation / the rich tradition of western sonic art and ‘digital-folk’ idioms. He studied music and linguistics in Greece, Sonology in the Netherlands, and is currently finishing a PhD in Visual and Performing Arts at the Center for Digital Arts and Experimental Media (DXARTS, University of Washington). You can view Manousakis’ portfolio online.

Manousakis will be visiting campus to share his process, produce work, and connect with students, faculty, and staff.

Please come to the following events in Bucksbaum Center for the Arts. Email Artists@Grinnell Residency for more information.

Scheduled Events

Student Lunch

Noon Wednesday, Feb. 18, in Bucksbaum Room 152

Artists@Grinnell and the Music Student Educational Policy Committee invites you to learn more about Stelios over an informal pizza lunch open to all majors and interested students.

Installation Tours

4:15 p.m. Wednesday, February 18, & Friday, February 20, in Faulconer Gallery

Manousakis’ sound installation titled "Act so there is no use in a centre" (2014) can be experienced in the Faulconer Gallery throughout his residency. The installation tours will be informal to give viewers a chance to ask the artist a few questions. The piece is an interactive radio-transmitted spatial play using text from Gertrude Stein’s “Rooms” (1914) and Manousakis’ audio archive.

Works in Progress Talk: Creating with Systems

4:15 p.m. Monday, February 23, in Faulconer Gallery

Stelios Manousakis will talk about feedback, musical cybernetics, and working with systems, processes, and texts. He will present some of his recent artworks and will discuss the creative processes involved while keeping an eye on a wider historical, scientific, and artistic context.

This talk is the first of a series called "Works in Progress Talks" where visiting artists are asked to speak about their processes.

Artists@Grinnell is an Innovation Fund project and a collaborative effort by Faulconer Gallery; the art and art history, music, and theatre and dance departments; and Writers@Grinnell. Manousakis’ residency is co-sponsored by the music department and Center for International Studies.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. Bucksbaum Center for the Arts and Faulconer Gallery are accessible. You can request accommodations from the event sponsor or Conference Operations.

Photography and German Expressionism

Photos and prints will be on display in the Faulconer Gallery for the first part of the semester. Gordon Parks: The Making of an Argument and Playing It Forward: German Expressionism to Expressionism Today” open with a reception on Friday, Jan. 23.

Gordon Parks: The Making of an Argument explores acclaimed photographer Gordon Parks' first photographic essay for Life magazine in 1948, "Harlem Gang Leader."

The exhibition traces the editorial process behind the production of the photo essay with vintage photographs, original issues of Life, contact sheets, and proof prints. It also raises important questions about photography as a documentary tool and a narrative device, its role in addressing social concerns, and its function in the world of publishing.

Playing It Forward: German Expressionism to Expressionism Today, features work acquired by the Faulconer Gallery from the collection of John L. and Roslyn Bakst Goldman of Rochester, New York. Since the Faulconer Gallery acquired the prints in 2001, the Goldmans have assembled a new collection of prints by international contemporary artists.

This exhibition will feature the print collections side-by-side, demonstrating the Goldmans' continued interests in cutting-edge printmaking and their fidelity to Expressionist ideals, including a wide variety of printing processes, masterful technique and challenging subject matter.

"The Parks and German Expressionism exhibitions feature artists confronting the issues of the world around them," says Daniel Strong, associate director and curator of exhibitions at the Faulconer Gallery. "While they are separate exhibitions, they speak to similar issues, and both align with Grinnell's commitment to social justice."

Strong curated Playing It Forward: German Expressionism to Expressionism Today while Gordon Parks: The Making of an Argument was curated by Russell Lord, Freeman Family Curator of Photographs at the New Orleans Museum of Art, in collaboration with The Gordon Parks Foundation.

In addition to the opening reception, numerous free public events will be held at the Falconer Gallery during the two exhibitions, which will run through March 15. 

Gordon Parks' photos and German expressionist prints to open at Faulconer Gallery

Grinnell, Iowa - Two exhibitions, "Gordon Parks: The Making of an Argument" and "Playing It Forward: German Expressionism to Expressionism Today," will open with a reception on Friday, Jan. 23, at Grinnell College's Faulconer Gallery.

The reception, which is free and open to the public, will run from 4:15 to 6 p.m. in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, 1108 Park St., Grinnell. Refreshments will be served.

"Gordon Parks: The Making of an Argument" explores acclaimed photographer Gordon Parks' first photographic essay for Life magazine in 1948, "Harlem Gang Leader."

Featuring vintage photographs, original issues of Life, contact sheets and proof prints, the exhibition traces the editorial process behind the production of the photo essay. The exhibition also raises important questions about photography as a documentary tool and a narrative device, its role in addressing social concerns and its function in the world of publishing.

"Playing It Forward: German Expressionism to Expressionism Today," features work acquired by the Faulconer Gallery from the collection of John L. and Roslyn Bakst Goldman of Rochester, New York. Since the Faulconer Gallery acquired the prints in 2001, the Goldmans have assembled a new collection of prints by international contemporary artists.

This exhibition will feature the print collections side-by-side, demonstrating the Goldmans' continued interests in cutting-edge printmaking and their fidelity to Expressionist ideals, including a wide variety of printing processes, masterful technique and challenging subject matter.

"The Parks and German Expressionism exhibitions feature artists confronting the issues of the world around them," said Daniel Strong, associate director and curator of exhibitions at Faulconer Gallery. "While they are separate exhibitions, they speak to similar issues, and both align with Grinnell's commitment to social justice."

Strong curated "Playing It Forward: German Expressionism to Expressionism Today" while “Gordon Parks: The Making of an Argument" was curated by Russell Lord, Freeman Family Curator of Photographs at the New Orleans Museum of Art, in collaboration with The Gordon Parks Foundation.

In addition to the opening reception, numerous free public events will be held at Falconer Gallery during the two exhibitions, which will run through March 15. These events include a:

  • Concert: Maurice Ravel's "Le Tombeau de Couperin: A Memorial to Friends Killed in the Great War," performed by Eugene Gaub, associate professor of music at Grinnell College, at 4:15 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 28. This concert is part of "A Century of War: 1914 and Beyond," sponsored by the College's Humanities Center.
  • Gallery Talk by Russell Lord titled "Authorship and Context in Question: Gordon Parks and the 'Harlem Gang Leader' Essay," at 4:15 p.m. Monday, Feb. 9. The talk will explore how Parks' first photographic essay for Life magazine was conceived, constructed and received.
  • Performance of "Carrying it Forward: Images, Word and Music," presented by students and guest performers celebrating Parks' contributions as a photographer, writer, filmmaker and musician. The College's Office of Intercultural Engagement and Leadership will host the performance, which starts at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 12, in Parks' honor and in celebration of Black History Month.
  • Gallery Talk by Jenny Anger, associate professor of art history at Grinnell College, titled "German Expressionism in America," at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 24. The talk will explore how two world wars and Americans' cultural admiration of France and the French bear some responsibility for the uneven American response to this early 20th-century movement in the arts. 
  • Gallery Talk titled "Look Twice" by Christiane Baumgartner, who is internationally known for monumental woodcuts that contrast the modern process of shooting digital video with the physicality of creating prints using ancient woodcutting techniques. Her talk will start at 4:15 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 26. Baumgartner's work is included in the "Playing it Forward" exhibition.
  • Ignite! Community Day on Saturday, Feb. 28, will give students from pre-kindergarten to eighth grade the opportunity to explore "Playing It Forward" through various hands-on classes. The event, offered in partnership with Careers in Education Professions, is free, but registration is required. For details, contact Tilly Woodward at woodward@grinnell.edu or 641-269-4663.

About Faulconer Gallery

Faulconer Gallery is located in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts at 1108 Park St., Grinnell. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, and admission is free. For more information about the exhibitions and related programs, call 641-269-4660 or visit www.grinnell.edu/faulconergallery. Information about parking and accessibility is available on the college website. Accommodation requests may be made to Conference Operations at 641-269-3235 or calendar@grinnell.edu.

About Grinnell College

Since its founding in 1846, Grinnell has become one of the nation's premier liberal arts colleges, enrolling 1,600 students from all 50 states and from as many countries. Grinnell's rigorous academic program emphasizes excellence in education for students in the liberal arts; the college offers the B.A. degree in a range of departments across the humanities, arts and sciences. Grinnell has a strong tradition of social responsibility and action, and self-governance and personal responsibility are key components of campus life. More information about Grinnell College is available at www.grinnell.edu.

Cutlines:

"Playing it Forward: German Expressionism to Expressionism Today"

Caption for linked photo: William Kentridge, "Man with Megaphone Cluster," 1998. Etching and aquatint with handcoloring. Collection of John L. and Roslyn Bakst Goldman.

 

"Gordon Parks: The Making of an Argument"

Caption for linked photo: Gordon Parks; American, 1912-2006; "Untitled, Harlem," New York, 1948; Gelatin silver print; Courtesy of The Gordon Parks Foundation. This image shows both the full frame image that Gordon Parks shot and the cropped selection, framed in the editor's marking pen, which was published in Life magazine. The cropped version dramatically heightens the intensity of the image, bringing the viewer closer to the fight.

Caption for linked photo: Gordon Parks; American, 1912-2006; "Untitled, Harlem," New York, 1948. Gelatin silver print, printed later; Courtesy of The Gordon Parks Foundation.

Caption for linked photo: Gordon Parks; American, 1912-2006; "Untitled, Harlem," New York, 1948; Gelatin silver print, printed later; Courtesy of The Gordon Parks Foundation.