Communication

Calendar Customer Code: 
COMMUNICATIONS

Priming the Pump

Fri, 2013-01-04 02:23 | By Anonymous (not verified)

 

Seeking to maximize the benefits of the decennial accreditation process for formative reflection and conversation, the College requested and received permission from the Higher Learning Commission to engage in a Special Emphasis self study focused on an issue critical to improving our ability to achieve our mission: reinvigorating our traditional commitment to train leaders in public service and social justice as we enter the 21st century. The College's mission reads, in part:

Senator Dole keynote at WWII celebration

Fri, 2013-01-04 02:23 | By Anonymous (not verified)

In the same strong voice that made him a Washington leader, Senator Bob Dole told local veterans and college community members today about his experiences as a World War II soldier and champion for all who served, young and old.

"Not everyone who served wore a uniform--teachers, nurses, others had to do their job so we could do ours," Dole said.

He also recognized several veterans in the audience whose stories he'd read during his plane trip to Grinnell.

Professor Emeritus of History George Drake '56 has compiled oral histories of several Poweshiek County veterans.

The East Street Shuffle

Fri, 2013-01-04 02:23 | By Anonymous (not verified)

 

Originally published in the Fall 2005 issue of The Grinnell Magazine.

On Sept. 20, 1975, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band played to a packed house at Grinnell's Darby Gym, virtually rockin' the place down. A month later, Springsteen simultaneously appeared on the covers of Time andNewsweek, hailed as the future of rock and roll.

The Evolution of Language

Fri, 2013-01-04 02:23 | By Anonymous (not verified)

Carmen Valentin, newly tenured in Grinnell's Spanish department, also has scholarly and personal interests on two continents -- in her case, Europe and North America. A native of Spain, she received B.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Hispanic philology at the University of Valladolid, and cut her teeth as an instructor by teaching the university's courses in Spanish for foreign students.

Continuing in the Family Business

Fri, 2013-01-04 02:23 | By Anonymous (not verified)

 

For Erik Simpson, English is more than a discipline; it's the family business.

He grew up in Olean, N.Y., the son of an English professor at St. Bonaventure University. His mother, too, is in academe, running the learning center at the local community college. His parents met -- as did he and his wife, Carolyn -- in an English graduate program. Simpson's father teaches the British Romantics; so does he.

That said, Simpson stresses that he never felt any pressure to walk the same path his parents walked. Quite the opposite, in fact.

Walking the Walk

Fri, 2013-01-04 02:23 | By Anonymous (not verified)

 

Issue: 

 Summer 2007

Author: 

 Mark Baechtel

When Grinnell's English department brought Ralph Savarese to Iowa six years ago from Florida, he saw it as a chance to nourish a range of interests that -- to an outsider, at least -- looks not only exhaustive, but downright exhausting.

Following the Connections

Fri, 2013-01-04 02:23 | By Anonymous (not verified)

Shuchi Kapila believes that English is an academic discipline that is anything but merely academic.

"By the time I got to university, the study of English had become a cutting-edge discipline," she says. "I felt that in studying English I would be doing something to change the world of ideas."

Kapila, who grew up in Chandrigarh and New Delhi, came of age intellectually and academically during a time of foment in Indian society, when the roles of women and questions of class were being re-examined from bottom to top.

My Story

Fri, 2013-01-04 02:23 | By Anonymous (not verified)

 

I have just finished my second cycle at the "Brain Injury Day Treatment Program" at the Rusk Institute of NYU Medical Center.

Before I started this training, I was unaware and didn't think I had any problems. I thought I could go right back to college. My family disagreed. At the time, I was arguing a lot and said hurtful things. I never wanted to, but I didn't know how to stop. This convinced me to come to Rusk and learn about my brain injury.

Samuel Elbert '28

Fri, 2013-01-04 02:23 | By Anonymous (not verified)

 

Died May 14, 1997

For many decades, it had become unfashionable, even rather awkward, for Hawaiians to speak Hawaiian, their own language. The language was dying.

But then Sam Elbert '28 came on the scene and recognized the importance of keeping the Hawaiian language alive. Over the last two decades or so, it has become acceptable to speak Hawaiian again. Elbert became an expert in the language, and with Mary Pukui, published a Hawaiian language dictionary.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Communication