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Board of Trustees elects new officers, re-elects eight members

Wednesday, May. 25, 2011 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA - The Grinnell College Board of Trustees elected new officers and re-elected eight trustees to four-year terms at its spring meeting.

  •  Clinton D. “Clint” Korver, a 1989 Grinnell graduate and venture capitalist from Atherton, Calif., was elected chair of the board, serving a two-year term. Elected as vice chairs were Laura Ferguson, a 1990 Grinnell graduate and Grinnell, Ia., family physician, and Paul Risser, a 1961 Grinnell graduate and nationally recognized biologist and university administrator from Norman, Okla.
  •  Re-elected to the board were:
  •  Robert F. Austin, a 1954 graduate and retired Houston, Tex., pediatrician,
  •  Kihwan Kim of Seoul, Korea, who leads the Seoul Financial Forum and is a 1957 graduate,
  •  Susan Holden McCurry, board member of the Holden Family Foundation and a 1971 graduate from Coralville, Ia., and Naples, Fla., o Karen Shaff, executive vice-president and general counsel of Principal Financial Group, Des Moines,
  •  Joel Spiegel of Woodinville, Wash., a 1978 graduate and retired vice-president of Amazon.com,
  •  David White, national executive director of the Screen Actors Guild, Los Angeles, and a 1990 graduate, and o Ferguson and Risser, who were also re-elected to four-year terms.

Grinnell College is a nationally recognized, private, four-year, liberal arts college located in Grinnell, Iowa. Founded in 1846, Grinnell enrolls 1,600 students from all 50 states and from as many international countries in more than 26 major fields, interdisciplinary concentrations, and pre-professional programs.


More than 1100 to return for Alumni Reunion Weekend, June 3-5

Wednesday, May. 18, 2011 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA -  

More than 1100 Grinnell College alumni, friends, and family will return to campus for the 132nd Alumni Reunion Weekend, June 3-5. Alumni will travel from as far as Thailand, Mexico and Canada to enjoy a full weekend of programming that begins Wednesday with Alumni College and concludes Sunday with a farewell breakfast and interdenominational Christian worship service.

Alumni College, which provides former students a chance to be in the classroom again, will focus on Africa and the college’s interdisciplinary studies programs devoted to that area of the world. Courses will be taught by Vicki Bentley-Condit, anthropology; Doug Cutchins, social commitment; Lesley Delmenico, theatre; George Drake, history; Bob Grey, political science; Shuchi Kapila, English; and J. Montgomery Roper, anthropology/global development studies.

Several new programs have been added to this year’s reunion schedule, including an open bench session on the Herrick Chapel organ; wellness activities; and Tiny Circus with Grinnell graduate Carlos Ferguson. The annual Alumni Lecture will be presented by Dr. John Canady, a 1980 graduate, who will discuss his experiences with “Giving Back: Surgical Humanitarian Missions in Developing Countries.”

Alumni Awards for service to professions, the college, and community will be presented to seven honored members of reunion classes on Saturday at 3:30 p.m. in Herrick Chapel. Other weekend highlights include the Reunion Waltz; 5K run/walk; music by campus bands from the classes of 2005-07; service projects; the traditional bakery run; and tours of new campus buildings and downtown.

For a schedule of reunion activities, go to http://loggia.grinnell.edu/reunion.


Grinnell College appoints new chief of fundraising and alumni relations

Thursday, May. 12, 2011 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA -  

After a national search, Grinnell College has named a new leader for the college’s fundraising and alumni relations operation. On July 5, Beth Halloran will begin her position as vice-president for development and alumni relations.

Currently assistant vice-president for the Office of University Development at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Halloran has 10 years experience in fundraising at Michigan, including director of major gifts for the law school and director of development for the Center for the Education of Women. Prior to her experience at University of Michigan, she worked in development at the Mayo Medical Center.

Grinnell College President Raynard S. Kington, M.D., Ph.D. said Halloran was selected from a large group of strong candidates. “Beth has demonstrated success in fundraising as a gift officer as well as an operational leader,” said Kington, adding, “Her intellectual ability; passionate commitment to Grinnell’s mission; and her ability to build meaningful relationships with members of the faculty, student body, board of trustees, and staff members overwhelmingly qualify her for Grinnell’s next vice-president for development and alumni relations. We are very fortunate to have her leadership during this important time in the College’s history.”

Halloran has long believed that the greatest societal equalizer is education. “Having the opportunity to join Grinnell College with its rich history of academic excellence and commitment to social change is compelling to me. I look forward to working closely with the entire Grinnell family to secure our future of excellence and deepen the impact Grinnellians make in the communities in which they live their lives,” said Halloran.

Halloran holds a B.S.W. from the College of Saint Teresa, an M.S.W. from the University of Wisconsin, and an M.B.A. from the University of St. Thomas.

Grinnell College is a nationally recognized, private, four-year, liberal arts college located in Grinnell, Iowa. Founded in 1846, Grinnell enrolls 1,600 students from all 50 states and from as many international countries in more than 26 major fields, interdisciplinary concentrations and pre-professional programs.

Young Innovator for Social Justice Prize announced

Tuesday, Nov. 30, 2010 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA - Grinnell College today announced the creation of a $300,000 annual prize program to honor individuals under the age of 40 who have demonstrated leadership in their fields and who show creativity, commitment and extraordinary accomplishment in effecting positive social change. The Grinnell College Young Innovator for Social Justice Prize will carry an award of $100,000, half to the individual and half to an organization committed to the winner’s area of social justice. One to three awards will be given each year for a total of up to $300,000 in prize monies.

The program directly reflects Grinnell’s historic mission to educate men and women “who are prepared in life and work to use their knowledge and their abilities to serve the common good.” Nominees may be U.S. citizens or nationals of other countries; no affiliation to Grinnell College is required. Entries are encouraged across a wide range of fields, including science, medicine, the environment, humanities, business, economics, education, law, public policy, social services, religion and ethics, as well as projects that cross these boundaries. The program will make a special effort to seek nominations of individuals who work in areas that may not have been traditionally viewed as directly connected to social justice, such as the arts and business.

The idea for The Grinnell College Young Innovator for Social Justice Prize originated with Grinnell’s new president, Raynard S. Kington, M.D., Ph.D., who began his tenure as the college’s thirteenth president in August, 2010. “I was attracted to Grinnell, in part, by the college’s longstanding belief in social justice as a core tenet of its liberal arts academic mission,” said Dr. Kington. “In creating this prize, we hope to encourage and recognize young individuals who embody our core values and organizations that share our commitment to change the world.”

Details of the program and its nomination process are available at www.grinnell.edu/socialjusticeprize. Each year, Grinnell will assemble a diverse panel of judges to evaluate the nominations and select winners who have demonstrated leadership, innovation, commitment, collaboration and extraordinary accomplishment in advancing social justice within their chosen fields. Judging criteria will also focus on how nominees embrace the values of a liberal arts education, including critical thinking, creative problem-solving, free inquiry and commitment to using and sharing knowledge for the common good.

“This prize represents a significant expansion of Grinnell’s educational philosophy,” said David White, chair of the board of trustees and Grinnell College class of 1990. “It extends the college’s mission beyond our campus and alumni community to individuals anywhere who believe, as we do, in the importance of social justice throughout the world.”

Nominations for the 2011 Prize are due by Feb. 1, with winners to be announced in May 2011, as the capstone of President Kington’s inaugural activities. In October of 2011, the college will hold a special symposium on campus featuring public lectures by prize recipients regarding their experiences and perspectives in shaping innovative social justice programs.

Grinnell College is a nationally recognized, private, four-year, liberal arts college located in Grinnell, Iowa. Founded in 1846, Grinnell enrolls 1,600 students from all 50 states and from as many international countries in more than 26 major fields, interdisciplinary concentrations and pre-professional programs.


"Kind Favor, Kind Letter" exhibition open at Faulconer Gallery

Friday, Jan. 14, 2011 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA - “Kind Favor, Kind Letter, “ a collaborative exhibition by Grinnell College faculty artist Lee Emma Running; Tatiana Ginsberg of Mount Holyoke College; and Santa Fe sculptor Kate Carr, will open Jan. 28 at Grinnell College’s Faulconer Gallery.

The installation of handmade paper, fabric, thread, and pre-printed material is based on the artists’ previous collaborative exhibition at Pyramid Atlantic Art Center in 2009. The three first worked together while training as papermakers at the University of Iowa Center for the Book.

“Hand-making paper is an aesthetic we learned together,” Running said. “The techniques have informed our practices as individual artists. We didn’t need to speak when making paper; our unspoken gestures were our dialogue.”

Gestures also play into the exhibition title, which is based on symbols or gestures from Gregg Shorthand, a phonetic writing system once used for speedy note-taking. The three artists wrote letters to one another as they began their collaboration, and their letters influenced the work on display in the Grinnell installation. “The text connected us across the country, and the garlands in the exhibition represent that connection,” Running said.

The three artists gathered in Grinnell in early January to install the works together. “We wanted to build an environment for the site-specific installation instead of discrete works. And we wanted to bring the show to Grinnell because of the collaborative model so student artists can see how they can stay connected to other artists,” Running said. Her works of paper will also be on display at Upper Iowa University and in Kansas City this spring.

Faulconer Gallery events related to “Kind Favor, Kind Letter” include:

  • Jan. 28, 4:15-6 p.m.: Opening reception.
  • Feb. 15, 4:15 p.m.: Gallery talk by Lee Emma Running, assistant professor of art, Grinnell College.
  • Mar. 2, 7:30 p.m.: Open mic night co-sponsored by Grinnell College Libraries
  • Mar. 10, 4:15 p.m.: “Unmapped Topography” gallery talk by Tatiana Ginsberg, Mount Holyoke College.
  • Thursdays, beginning Feb. 3, 12:15-12:50 p.m.: yoga in the gallery with Monica St. Angelo

“Kind Favor, Kind Letter” runs through Mar. 20 concurrent with “Of Fables and Folly,” an exhibition by South African artist Diane Victor. “Kind Favor, Kind Letter” is coordinated by Daniel Strong, associate director of Faulconer Gallery, and will be on display during regular gallery hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday, Sunday: noon – 5 p.m.; Thursday, Friday: noon – 8 p.m. or by appointment. All exhibition events are held in Faulconer Gallery in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts on the Grinnell campus, unless otherwise noted. For more information about the exhibition and related programs, call 641-269-4660 or visit www.grinnell.edu/faulconergallery.


Former White House correspondent on campus week of May 2

Tuesday, Apr. 19, 2011 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA -  

Former White House correspondent Richard Benedetto will talk about his political journalism career while on the Grinnell College campus during the week of May 2 as part of the Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellows program. Benedetto will visit English, political science and history classes throughout the week, have informal meetings with students, and give two free public lectures.

• Mon., May 2, 7:30 p.m.: Benedetto will discuss “What It’s Like to Cover the White House,” based on his 40-year career.

• Tues., May 3, 4:15 p.m.: Benedetto will offer his perspectives on “Political Coverage: Who Are the Media Talking To, Voters or Themselves?”

Both lectures will be held in Room 101 of the Joe Rosenfield ’25 Center on the Grinnell campus.

Benedetto was a founding staff member of USA Today and wrote the paper’s first cover story. In addition to reporting on the White House and national politics, he wrote a weekly political column for the Gannett News Service, covering every presidential campaign from 1984-2004. Retired since 2006, he continues his involvement in journalism as a consultant for C-Span and as an adjunct faculty member at American University’s School of Public Affairs.

The Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellows Program brings to campus prominent artists, diplomats, journalists, and business leaders to make connections between the academic and non-academic worlds. Benedetto’s Grinnell lectures are sponsored by the Rosenfield Program in Public Affairs, International Relations, and Human Rights. For more information about the program, contact Sarah Purcell, director, purcelsj@grinnell.edu, 641-269-3091. Grinnell welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. If accommodations are needed, please contact641-269-3235 as soon as possible to make a request.