Media relations

"Africa's Role in International Arena" symposium Apr. 9-13

Monday, Mar. 26, 2012 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA - Africa’s current and future roles in the international arena will be the focus of a week-long symposium at Grinnell College, Apr. 9-13, sponsored by the college’s Rosenfield Program in Public Affairs, International Relations and Human Rights. A former ambassador to Ethiopia, scholars of African politics and economics, and a recent leader of Africare will share first-hand experiences about the continent.

“Africa is a continent of contrasts that has tremendous importance for the rest of the world—international relations, economic growth, cultural affairs,” said Sarah Purcell, director of the Rosenfield Program. “We want to get at that importance by taking a look at Africa’s regional issues, as well as its effective relationships with the rest of the world.”

The week-long symposium will include the following free, public events to be held in Room 101 of the Joe Rosenfield ’25 Center on the Grinnell campus (unless otherwise noted):

  • Mon., Apr. 9, 8 p.m.: Lahra Smith, assistant professor in Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service, will discuss “Old Trade-Offs and New Realities: Challenges of Economic Development and Political Reform in Africa” in Alumni Recitation Hall, Room 302.
  •  Tues., Apr. 10, 4:15 p.m.: Boniface Dulani, a member of the faculty at the University of Malawi, will consider recent political movements in “Neither Consolidating nor Fully Democratic: The Evolution of African Political Regimes, 1999-2008.”
  •  Wed., Apr. 11, 4:15 p.m.: Africa’s place in the arts world will be the topic for Kelly Askew, associate professor of anthropology and Afroamerican/African Studies at the University of Michigan, in “Poetry and Politics along the Indian Ocean Littoral.” Askew is also director of Michigan’s African Studies Center.
  •  Wed., Apr. 11, 8 p.m.: Ambassador David Shinn, former U.S. ambassador to Burkina Faso and Ethiopia, will compare “China and Africa: An Evolving Relationship.” Shinn is adjunct professor at the Elliott School of International Affairs at the George Washington University.
  •  Thurs., Apr. 12, 11 a.m.: Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow Julius Coles will deliver the Scholars’ Convocation on “Prospects for Africa in the 21st Century.” Coles, the former president of Africare, is director of Morehouse College’s Andrew Young Center for International Affairs.
  •  Thurs., Apr. 12, 4:15 p.m.: The role of women will be the topic of a talk by Pearl Robinson, associate professor of political science at Tufts University, in “African Muslim Women and Civic Islam.”
  •  Fri., Apr. 13, noon: The symposium will close with a lecture in South Lounge of the College Forum by Assefa Mehretu, professor of geography at Michigan State University. Mehretu, who is also director of the Center for Integrative Studies in Social Science at Michigan, will discuss “The Rise and Decline of America's Soft-Power in Africa: The Case of Ethiopia.”

The African and Caribbean Students Union will host a film festival in connection with the symposium, offering “Umkhungo” at 8 p.m. on Apr. 12; “Teza” at 7 p.m. on Apr. 14; and “Ties that Bind” at 4:15 p.m. on Apr. 15. All films will be shown in Alumni Recitation Hall, Room 302.

For more information about the symposium, contact Sarah Purcell, purcelsj@grinnell.edu, 641-269-3091. Grinnell welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. Information on parking and accessibility is available on the college website. Accommodation requests may be made to Conference Operations at 641-269-3235 or calendar@grinnell.edu.

-30-

"1966 Yearbook Project" exhibition takes trip back in time via latest digital technology

Wednesday, Apr. 4, 2012 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA - In the days before personal computers, cell phones and email came the yearbook “Grinnell College – 1966,” deemed too controversial and banned from publication by the college until 1986. Photographed by Grinnell alumni Henry Wilhelm and the late John Phillips with contributions from fellow students John Wolf and Robert Hodierne, the yearbook was created as a photographic documentary of life in and out of the classroom at Grinnell during the mid-1960s, a time that soon led to major cultural and political turmoil on campuses and in society.

As part of a project to digitally re-master the 1966 yearbook for free worldwide online distribution, more than 100 high-quality, large-format photographs selected from the yearbook will be exhibited at Grinnell’s Faulconer Gallery, Apr. 13-June 3. The black-and-white images have been digitally printed from high-resolution scans of the photographers’ original 35mm negatives, preserved by Wilhelm for more than 45 years.

Wilhelm is an internationally recognized expert on photographic preservation and director of research at Wilhelm Imaging Research, Inc. in Grinnell. He has been a preservation consultant to numerous collecting institutions, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Corbis documentary photography collections owned by Bill Gates. In 2007, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Photoimaging Manufacturers and Distributors Association for his work on the evaluation of the permanence of traditional and digital color prints. In 2011, he received an honorary doctor of science degree from Grinnell.

A series of free, public exhibition programs, sponsored by Grinnell College and Faulconer Gallery, will provide background on the yearbook project and insight into the technological transformations making it accessible to the public. All events will be held in Faulconer Gallery unless otherwise noted.

  • Apr. 13, 4:15 p.m.: A panel discussion by college trustee Harold Fuson, an authority on freedom of the press; Wolf, who co-authored the yearbook’s text; attorney Michael Horwatt; and Wilhelm will focus on the book’s innovations, controversies and eventual publication. The discussion, moderated by Grinnell President Emeritus George Drake who arranged to publish the yearbook in 1986, will include First Amendment rights and the exercise and restraint of those rights at colleges and universities. Fuson, former editor of the college newspaper, lawyer, and journalist, is the author of “Telling it All: A Legal Guide to the Exercise of Free Speech.” Horwatt represented Phillips and Wilhelm in 1966 in negotiations with the college about the banned yearbook. 
  • April 13, 6-7 p.m.: Opening reception. • Apr. 24, 4:15 p.m.: “The Forbidden Text” reading and panel discussion by Grinnell College students, faculty and staff who will read from censored or banned texts and explore issues of censorship and technology. 
  • May 3, 4:15 p.m.: Gallery talk by Wilhelm about the changing technologies of photography, printing and image storage since the 1960s.


Concurrent with the “1966 Yearbook Project” are three special exhibitions in campus galleries: civil rights photographs by John Phillips in Burling Gallery and John Chrystal Center, and a related Burling Gallery exhibit of activism photos and memorabilia organized by members of classes from 1967 to 1973. The Phillips’ prints, selected from two portfolios of work acquired by Faulconer Gallery, include photographs taken in 1965 of Martin Luther King Jr.’s historic voting rights protests in Selma, Ala.

A set of prints of the 501 photographs in the yearbook will become part of the college’s permanent collection, and a high-resolution Adobe Acrobat PDF/A archival format digital edition of the book will also be created for online distribution. Supporters of these projects include Grinnell College, the late John Phillips, Henry, Carol, and Charlie Wilhelm, and the staff of Wilhelm Imaging Research, with assistance from Canon and ScanCafe.

Faulconer Gallery, located in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, 1108 Park St. on the Grinnell campus, is open Tuesday-Wednesday, noon to 5 p.m., Thursday-Friday, noon to 8 p.m., Saturday-Sunday, noon to 5 p.m.; closed Monday. For more information about the photographers, exhibition and related programs, call 641-269-4660 or visit www.grinnell.edu/faulconergallery.

-30-

Winners of 2012 Grinnell Prize for social change announced

Thursday, Sep. 6, 2012 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA - Grinnell College has announced the winners of the second annual  Grinnell Prize honoring young innovators for social change: Cristi Hegranes, executive director and founder, Global Press Institute; Jacob A. Wood, president of  Team Rubicon, and William B. McNulty III vice president of Team Rubicon (shared award); and Jane Chen, CEO of Embrace Innovations and co-founder, Embrace, and Linus Liang, Embrace co-founder and COO (shared award).

The Grinnell Prize, which received nominations from 45 countries, honors individuals under the age of 40 who have demonstrated leadership in their fields and who show creativity, commitment and extraordinary accomplishment in effecting positive social change.  Each winning entry receives $100,000, half to the individual(s) and half to an organization the winner(s) designates, for a total of $300,000 awarded this year in prize monies.

The pool of nominees for the Grinnell Prize spanned a diverse array of social issues, including hunger relief, disaster relief, childhood education, economic development, the environment, literacy, community-produced news, youth arts, fair housing, violence prevention, immigration, GLBTQ, restorative justice, public access to healthcare delivery, children’s mental health, urban agriculture, and global peace, among others.

“I’m delighted to announce these truly inspiring individuals as the winners of the 2012 Grinnell Prize. These young men and women embody Grinnell’s long-standing mission to prepare students to go out into the world and use their education for the benefit of the common good,” said Grinnell College President Raynard S. Kington, M.D., Ph.D. “Since we launched the Grinnell Prize two years ago, we have learned about a remarkable number of young people who are striving to make the world a better place. Our 2012 winners represent the ideals of the prize program in every way possible.”

Details for the second annual Grinnell Prize winners are as follows:

After observing numerous problems within her profession while working as a foreign correspondent in Nepal, Hegranes founded the Global Press Institute (GPI) to confront two specific challenges she observed: “the decline of quality international journalism and the need for more women’s economic empowerment.” Through GPI, Hegranes uses journalism as a development tool to educate, employ and empower women to produce high-quality local news coverage that elevates global awareness and ignites social change.

Hegranes has built a network of professional women journalists throughout the developing world – all of whom earn a fair wage for reporting about their communities. Their unique coverage of issues, specifically those often overlooked by the mainstream media, contributes directly to community development and empowerment and also brings greater transparency and change to the way the world views their people and cultures.

To help combat reintegration problems faced by many U.S. veterans, Wood and McNulty founded Team Rubicon to unite the skills and experiences of military veterans with medical professionals who deploy first-response teams to disaster areas. Since its founding in January 2010, Team Rubicon has successfully affected thousands of lives, including victims of global and national disasters and returning U.S. military veterans. While providing aid on the streets of Port-au-Prince in the aftermath of the Haitian earthquake, Team Rubicon veterans realized that natural disasters present many of the same problems that confront troops in Iraq and Afghanistan: unstable populations, limited resources and horrific conditions. The skills cultivated by those on the battlefields – emergency medicine, risk assessment and mitigation, teamwork and leadership –are invaluable in disaster zones. By helping veterans transfer these critical skills, Team Rubicon has given hundreds of military men and women  a renewed sense of purpose and has pioneered a new paradigm in disaster response that  helps fringe victims outside the scope of where traditional aid organizations venture.

In 2007, Chen and Liang created a $200 infant warmer in response to a challenge posed during a Stanford University course and following a trip to Nepal where they witnessed firsthand the high infant death rates in developing countries due to hypothermia. Reduced from the normal $20,000 cost of an incubator, the infant warmer can be used in remote regions of the world without a continuous supply of electricity. Realizing that their innovation solved a small part of a large problem – specifically poor maternal and child health outcomes in developing countries – Chen and Liang are also working on preventive measures including education in remote areas such as Jhagadia, India and Banadir, Somalia, where their infant warmers are provided.

Embrace is also investing in research and development to create additional, low-cost health innovations to improve both women’s and children’s well-being.  Early this year, Chen and Liang created the for-profit venture Embrace Innovations, which will license the technology from Embrace and work on manufacturing, distribution and research for new products.

The winners will visit the Grinnell College campus the week of November 12 to participate in the Grinnell Prize Symposium and awards ceremony.  Through public lectures and interactions with students and the campus community, the winners will share their experiences and perspectives of how they were able to create innovative programs to effect positive social change.

Jerry Greenfield, co-founder of Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream, will be the keynote speaker on Nov. 14. Before age 30, Greenfield and business partner Ben Cohen opened an ice cream shop in Burlington, Vt., that has since spawned a global brand. Though known for its ice cream, Ben & Jerry’s also has a strong commitment to “a sustainable corporate concept of linked prosperity.” Greenfield and Cohen are devoted not only to product and economic missions, but also to a progressive, nonpartisan social mission that “seeks to meet human needs and eliminate injustices” in their local, national and international communities by integrating the social concerns of their mission into day-to-day business activities.

Nominations for the 2013 Grinnell Prize are open through Nov. 5.

Grinnell College is a nationally recognized, private, four-year, liberal arts college located in Grinnell, Iowa.  Founded in 1846, Grinnell enrolls 1,600 students from all 50 states and from as many international countries in more than 26 major fields, interdisciplinary concentrations and pre-professional programs.

Writers@Grinnell kicks off fall semester

Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012 9:30 pm

Grinnell, IA - Writers@Grinnell will open its fall semester program with a reading from novelist and essayist Natalie Bakopoulos on Thurs., Sept. 13. All readings will be in Room 101 of the Joe Rosenfield '25 Center on the Grinnell College campus at 8 p.m. unless noted.

"We have an incredible group of writers coming this year," said Dean Bakopoulos, assistant professor of English, who is directing this year's program. "Some of the most entertaining readers and engaging teachers of writing in the country are coming to Grinnell this year. I'm excited for our students."

Natalie Bakopoulos will hold a roundtable discussion in Room 226 of the Joe Rosenfield '25 Center at 4:15 p.m. Bakopoulos recently released her first novel "The Green Shore," which paints a finely-etched portrait of one family, whose heartbreaking stories of love and resistance play out against the backdrop of the late 1960s Greek military dictatorship. She has also written essays for "Granta," "Salon," and "The New York Times" about Greece's current economic crisis. She is the sister of Dean Bakopoulos, who will join her for the roundtable discussion entitled "Sibling Rivalry: Writing About Family Without Getting Disowned."

Historian, biographer, and journalist Sam Tanenhaus, a 1977 Grinnell College graduate and visiting faculty in English, will give a presentation on Thurs., Sept. 27. Tanenhaus is the editor of "The New York Times Book Review" and the author of "The Death of Conservatism" and "Whittaker Chambers: A Biography."

On Oct. 4, author Charles Baxter, acclaimed fiction writer, critic, and one of the nation's most beloved creative writing teachers, will read from his most recent story collection, "Gryphon: New and Selected Stories," recently published by Pantheon/Random House. Baxter is also the author of a dozen other books, including the National Book Award finalist "The Feast of Love."

May-lee Chai, a writer, educator and 1989 graduate of Grinnell College, has participated in past Writers@Grinnell series and will be back on Thurs., Oct. 11 to lead a roundtable discussion on "Writing after Grinnell" at 4:15 p.m. in Room 226 of the Joe Rosenfield '25 Center. Following the roundtable, Chai will read from her new memoir "Hapa Girl." This event will be held at the college's Faulconer Gallery at 8 p.m.

On Thurs., Nov. 1, Ronald Wallace, will read from his poetry, including selections from "Long for this World" and "For a Limited Time Only." Wallace will also lead a roundtable presentation on formal poetry at 4:15 p.m. in Room 209 of the Joe Rosenfield '25 Center. Praised as "one of our liveliest, most readable poets" by Charles Harper Webb, Wallace's trademark warmth and wit makes poetry lovers out of the form's sworn enemies.

Brothers Davy and Peter Rothbart began FOUND Magazine in 2001. The magazine spawned the 2004 bestseller "Found: The Best Lost, Tossed, and Forgotten Items from Around the World," as well as two other collections in 2006 and 2009. On Sun., Nov. 11, Davy will read selections from his new essay collection "My Heart is an Idiot" and will be accompanied by musical selections composed and performed by Peter. True performers, the Rothbart brothers have sat on David Letterman's interview couch and have been featured on the radio show "This American Life."

Students of the Grinnell Review will round off the fall semester readings on Thurs., Dec. 6, with readings from the campus's literary journal, which is edited and designed entirely by Grinnell students.

The Joe Rosenfield '25 Center is located at 1115 8th Ave. on the Grinnell College campus. Faulconer Gallery is located in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts at 1108 Park Street, also on the college's campus. Grinnell welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. Information on parking and accessibility is available on the college website. Accommodation requests may be made to Conference Operations at 641-269-3235 or calendar@grinnell.edu.

-30-

The Metropolitan Opera returns to Grinnell College live in HD

Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2012 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA -  

Grinnell College is welcoming back New York City's Metropolitan Opera for the 2012-2013 season. The fall semester will include six "Live in HD" performances at the Harris Center Cinema on the Grinnell campus. Shows start Saturdays at noon and will be preceded by a half-hour opera talk by select faculty and staff members at 11:30 a.m.

The Live in HD series will begin Oct. 13. Below are the operas that will be featured:

  • October 13: Gaetano Donizetti's L'Elisir d'Amore, considered one of the greatest comic gems in opera
  • October 27: Otello, Giuseppe Verdi's Shakespearean masterpiece
  • November 10: The Tempest, composed and conducted by Thomas Adès, recreates the interior of 18th-century La Scala
  • December 1: La Clemenza di Tito, Mozart's drama set in ancient Rome
  • December 8: Un Ballo in Maschera, a dramatic story of jealousy and vengeance composed by Giuseppe Verdi
  • December 15: Aida, Giuseppe Verdi's ancient Egyptian drama featuring the enslaved Ethiopian princess caught in a love triangle with the heroic Radamès and the proud Egyptian princess Amneris.

An encore presentation of Verdi's Otello will be shown on Oct. 31 at 6:30 p.m. with an opera talk at 6 p.m. This encore presentation will be a recording of an earlier live broadcast.

Synopses of the shows are available at http://www.metoperafamily.org/metopera/liveinhd/LiveinHD.aspx. Details for the spring 2013 Live in HD season will be announced at a later date.

Starting Aug. 24 for Met Opera members and Sept. 4 for the general public, tickets will be available for purchase at the Pioneer Bookshop in downtown Grinnell and the Grinnell College Bookstore: $15 for adults, $10 for students. Tickets will also be available at the Harris Center on the day of the show. Tickets for Grinnell College faculty, staff and students have been generously funded by the Office of the President and are available at no cost at all ticket locations.

Harris Center is located at 1114 10th Ave., with available parking east of the center on 10th Ave. Grinnell welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. Information on parking and accessibility is available on the college website. Accommodation requests may be made to Conference Operations at 641-269-3235 orcalendar@grinnell.edu.

-30-

Four Grinnell College students awarded federal scholarships to study abroad

Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2012 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA -  

GRINNELL, IA—Four Grinnell College students have received federally-funded Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarships to support study abroad during the 2012-2013 school year.

The Gilman Scholarship is a federal grant program that "provides awards for U.S. undergraduate students receiving Federal Pell Grant funding to participate in study abroad programs worldwide." The program aims to diversify the kinds of students who study abroad and the countries and regions where they go by supporting undergraduates who might otherwise not participate due to financial constraints. The four Grinnell students and their programs are:

  • Laura Huerta, a third year sociology major with a concentration in American studies, is from Los Angeles, Calif., and will study in Denmark. She volunteers at a local animal shelter, has worked as a multicultural resource intern on Grinnell's campus, and is a Posse scholar. She hopes to either receive her master's in social work or start her own organization to help the youth and gang members of South Central Los Angeles.
  • Anika Manzoor, a gender, women's and sexuality studies major with a concentration in global development studies, from Bethesda, Md., will study in Costa Rica for the fall semester of her senior year. At Grinnell she is a student advisor and Posse Scholar. In Maryland she leads School Girls Unite, a nonprofit organization that engages young people in activism regarding global issues that affect girls.
  • Jenny Mith, a rising junior and Philosophy major from Los Angeles, Calif., will study in the Grinnell-in-London program. At Grinnell, she is a part of the student educational policy committee for the philosophy department, a Mellon Mays Fellow, and a Posse Scholar.
  • Sara Sanders, a political science major from Lincoln, Neb., will study in France. She is entering her third year and is the head librarian of Grinnell College's KDIC 88.5 radio station.

Grinnell College is a nationally recognized, private, four year, liberal arts college located in Grinnell, Iowa. Founded in 1846, Grinnell enrolls 1,600 students from all 50 states and from as many international countries in more than 26 major fields, interdisciplinary concentrations, and pre-professional programs.

-30-

Mellon grants to Grinnell totaling more than $1 million

Friday, Aug. 10, 2012 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA -  

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded Grinnell College grants totaling more than $1 million to support continual development of interdisciplinary courses and programs in the humanities and to encourage students to consider college teaching careers.

            A $100,000 Mellon Presidential Discretionary Grant supports development of courses and co-curricular programs that demonstrate the benefit of humanities study in lifelong learning. Grant activities will be coordinated through Grinnell’s Center for the Humanities, which supports research and teaching as well as invited talks, symposia and ongoing activities that draw attention to scholarly work in classical and modern languages, the arts, philosophy, and religion.

“The Mellon grant allows us to develop programs that address recent national discussions about the place of the humanities in education, policy-making and business,” said Shuchi Kapila, director of the Center for the Humanities and associate professor of English. More than one-third of Grinnell students graduate with degrees in humanities fields of study.

            A second Mellon grant of more than $400,000 renews the college’s relationship with the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship (MMUF) Program, which encourages “minority students and others with demonstrated commitment to eradicating racial disparities” to pursue Ph.D.s in the arts and sciences. Grinnell joined the MMUF program in 2009 with assistance from an initial Mellon grant. MMUF fellows receive mentoring from faculty, funding for conference attendance, loan repayment support, and other resources that connect them to a national network of current and future college professors.

            “We are grateful to the Mellon Foundation for recognizing Grinnell’s commitment to the Mellon Mays Fellowship Program,” said Shanna Benjamin, faculty coordinator for the MMUF program and assistant professor of English. “The renewal grant allows us to continue our efforts to identify and support promising students who want to teach at the college level.”

            A third grant of $540,000 renews initial Mellon funding of Grinnell’s Expanding Knowledge Initiative (EKI), which extends the college’s liberal-arts curriculum through interdisciplinary courses of contemporary academic relevance. “The Expanding Knowledge Initiative continues to be an important part of advancing student learning across traditional disciplines,” said Dean of the College Paula Smith. “The Mellon grant support is important to our commitment to faculty and curriculum development.”  For example, the Mellon grant funding has allowed Grinnell to add Arabic language instruction to the curriculum.  

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation supports projects in higher education, information technology, performing arts, arts conservation, and the environment. The MMUF program is in its 24th year and has supported more than 3,700 fellows nationwide.

Grinnell College is a nationally recognized, private, four-year, liberal arts college located in Grinnell, Iowa. Founded in 1846, Grinnell enrolls 1,600 students from all 50 states and from as many international countries in more than 26 major fields, interdisciplinary concentrations, and pre-professional programs.

-30-

Grinnell Prize selection committee announced

Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2012 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA -  

Grinnell College has announced the 10-member selection committee to determine the winners of the 2013 Grinnell Prize. The award program honors young innovators under the age of 40 who have demonstrated leadership in their fields and who show creativity, commitment and extraordinary accomplishment in effecting positive social change.

Nominations for the 2013 Prize will be accepted beginning Sept. 5, when the winners of the 2012 Prize will be announced, and are due by Nov. 5, 2012. Winners of the 2013 Prize will be announced in the fall of 2013. Details of the program and its nomination process are available atwww.grinnell.edu/socialjusticeprize.

“Each year, the Grinnell Prize selection committee is required to select Prize winners from hundreds of qualified and impressive nominations,” said Grinnell College President Raynard S. Kington, M.D., Ph.D. “With the prize program entering its third year, the quality of these nominations continues to impress us, and we are thrilled to have a selection committee with so much experience and passion for effecting positive social change.”

The selection committee will be chaired by Eliza Willis, professor of political science, Grinnell College. Willis teaches courses on Latin American politics, global development, international political economy, and the political economy of developing countries. She previously served as chair of the Grinnell faculty.

The nine other members – largely Iowa-based – are recognized individuals who work for social change in various capacities. Their backgrounds, accomplishments and experiences reflect the diversity in Grinnell students, faculty, staff, alumni, and the state.

  • Meg Jones Bair, director of donor relations, Grinnell College. She has served in a variety of positions in the Development and Alumni Relations office during the past 17 years and also served on the Poweshiek County Foster Care Review Board and the Grinnell College Collection Committee.
  • Emily Westergaard Hamilton, executive director, Des Moines “I Have a Dream” Foundation and Grinnell College 2002 graduate. Her organization works with at-risk youth to help students graduate and attend college.
  • Chris Hunter, professor of sociology, Grinnell College. He has served as coordinator of the college’s Minority Opportunities through School Transformation Program, a faculty representative on the Associated Colleges of the Midwest Committee on Minority Concerns, and on the boards of Mid-Iowa Community Action and the public library.
  • Kristi Knous, president and COO, Community Foundation of Greater Des Moines.  She also serves on the boards of Bravo Greater Des Moines, Midwest Housing Equity Group, and the Iowa State University Foundation Women and Philanthropy Advisory Committee.
  • Colleen Osborne, Grinnell College senior and student body president. She is a political science major hoping to pursue a career in women’s advocacy and international relations.
  • Suku Radia, president and CEO, Bankers Trust. He is active in numerous professional, economic development, educational and charitable organizations, including United Way of Central Iowa and the Community Foundation of Greater Des Moines.
  • Suzanne Siskel, executive vice president and chief operating officer, The Asia Foundation. She oversees the foundation’s day-to-day operations and works on strategy and policy issues in the Asia-Pacific region.
  • Marsha Ternus, former chief justice, Iowa Supreme Court. As chief justice, she made the improvement of court oversight of child welfare cases a priority for the Iowa Judicial Branch, and in 2012, was honored with the John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award.
  • Barrett Thomas, member of the Grinnell College board of trustees and a 1997 graduate. He is an associate professor in the Department of Management Sciences at the University of Iowa and is active in the fields of process improvement, logistics, and dynamic programming.

Selection committee members will pick one to three winners to receive an award of $100,000, half awarded to the individual and half to an organization committed to the winner’s area of social change, for a total of up to $300,000 in prize monies. Past nominations have spanned a diverse array of social issues, including hunger relief, childhood education, environmental issues, literacy, youth arts, fair housing, violence prevention, immigration, GLBTQ, youth services, hospice care, children’s mental health and global peace, among many others.

The Grinnell Prize directly reflects Grinnell’s historic mission to educate men and women “who are prepared in life and work to use their knowledge and their abilities to serve the common good.” Nominations are open to U.S. citizens as well as nationals of other countries and are encouraged across a wide range of fields, including science, medicine, the environment, humanities, business, economics, education, law, public policy, social services, religion and ethics, as well as projects that cross these boundaries. Special efforts are made to seek nominees who work in areas that may not be traditionally viewed as directly connected to social justice, such as the arts and business. No affiliation with Grinnell College is required.

Grinnell College is a nationally recognized, private, four-year, liberal arts college located in Grinnell, Iowa. Founded in 1846, Grinnell enrolls 1,600 students from all 50 states and from as many international countries in more than 26 major fields, interdisciplinary concentrations and pre-professional programs.

Grinnell to participate in Iowa Private College Week Aug. 6-10

Thursday, Jul. 12, 2012 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA -  

Grinnell College, one of 28 members of the Iowa Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (IAICU), will host prospective students and families during Iowa Private College Week, Aug. 6-10.

“These initial campus visits give students and families the opportunity to learn firsthand which Iowa college may be the right fit for their future,” said Will Cummins, assistant director of admission and coordinator of Grinnell’s activities for the tour week.

Information sessions will be held daily on the Grinnell campus at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.  Prospective students will meet with faculty and current students, learn about academic programs and financial aid availability, and tour residence halls and campus facilities.

Each visiting student will receive a “passport” stamped at each Iowa college on the tour; students who visit three or more campuses and enroll at a participating college are eligible for $500 bookstore drawings. Casey’s General Stores have also partnered with IAICU to offer gas discounts for families making campus visits Aug. 6-10.

Students may register for a Grinnell campus visit at http://www.grinnell.edu/admission/visit, or pre-register for IPCW campus visits at www.thinkindependently.com.  

Grinnell College is a nationally recognized, private, four year, liberal arts college located in Grinnell, Iowa. Founded in 1846, Grinnell enrolls 1,600 students from all 50 states and from as many international countries in more than 26 major fields, interdisciplinary concentrations, and pre-professional programs.

                                                                        -30-

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Media relations