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Voyage en Chine

Voyage en Chine is J. Castera’s 1805 translation of John Barrow’s original book, Voyage in China, published one year prior. The French edition is split into three volumes with an accompanying atlas to the text. Special Collections has only this atlas portion containing twenty-two plates. These plates contain a collection of charts and illustrations of Chinese culture and society from Barrow’s journey through the Qing Empire. Unfortunately, the copy has been damaged and is missing a handful of pages.

Barrow was private secretary to English Ambassador of China, Lord Macartney, during their 1792 envoy to China. During this time period, Great Britain was attempting to establish trade relations with China, which the envoy failed to procure during its trip. Another part of the envoy’s mission, however, was to get more information about the Chinese empire, including their military strength. Simultaneously a survey of Chinese culture, and an assessment of Chinese capabilities, Voyage en Chine represents the deep fascination and suspicion Westerners held for the Far East, prior to imperialistic war campaigns that took place later on in the 1800s — these campaigns include the Opium Wars pursued by Great Britain during the 1840s and 1850s.

Voyage en Chine begins with illustrations of a rice mill, a handful of Chinese characters, and a depiction of Qing currency. A variety of instruments and even musical scores are also recorded. This book contains depictions of Chinese society and culture, but it also catalogues Chinese artillery weapons and architecture. It is regrettable that the text volumes are not available, but the detailed plates still indicate the seriousness with which these studies of the East were conducted.

We encourage anyone with an interest to drop by Special Collections and take a look at this book in person.  Special Collections and Archives is open to the public 1:30-5 p.m. Monday through Friday and mornings by appointment.

May 17 Libraries Study Break w/the G-Tones

Grinnell College Libraries invites you to join us at Burling for a quick break from studying with milk, homemade cookies, and student performers!

Study breaks are at 9 p.m. on Monday, May 16, and Tuesday, May 17, in Burling Lounge. The improv group Ritalin Test Squad will perform on Monday, and the a capella group Grinnell College G-Tones will sing on Tuesday.

Cookies will also be delivered to Kistle Science Library.

Co-spSGA logoonsored by the Student Government Association.





 

May 16 Libraries Study Break w/Ritalin Test Squad

Grinnell College Libraries invites you to join us at Burling for a quick break from studying with milk, homemade cookies, and student performers!

Study breaks are at 9 p.m. on Monday, May 16, and Tuesday, May 17, in Burling Lounge. The improv group Ritalin Test Squad will perform on Monday, and the a capella group Grinnell College G-Tones will sing on Tuesday.

Cookies will also be delivered to Kistle Science Library.

SGA logoCo-sponsored by the Student Government Association.

Check out Subject Guides

Trapped in a research project with nowhere to turn? At the end of a dark database alley with no relevant sources in sight? … Never fear, Subject Guides are here!

Drawing together important resources for research in every discipline, the subject guides are a great starting point for digging up everything from statistics and data sets to elusive primary sources. Unsure where to start? There’s even a subject guide for doing research.

Student Activism and the Role of Student Newspapers

“Student Activism and the Role of Student Newspapers, 1967-1970” is now on display in Burling Gallery on the lower level.

Using newspapers and photos from the Special Collections and Archives, this exhibit looks at the alternative and underground newspapers printed by Grinnell students between 1967 and 1970. The changing, and often tumultuous, cultural and political landscape of the 1960s and 1970s lent itself particularly well to the creation of alternative newspapers.

Alternative newspapers at Grinnell created a space to stage dialogues and demonstrations, and connect students to larger movements outside of Grinnell that related to both local and national issues.

These student publications also pushed the boundaries of the purpose of newspapers in fascinating ways. Among the newspapers included are the Pterodactyl, the High and Mighty, the Brotherhood, and a variety of single-issue publications.

Any items in the display and mentioned in the brochure are available for library patrons to examine at Special Collections, also located on the lower level of Burling.

This exhibit was curated by Hana Lord ’18, with poster design by Han Trinh ’17.

A Book Talk with Dr. Edward C. Cohn

Grinnell College Libraries presents a book talk with Dr. Edward C. Cohn on Friday, April 15, at 4:15 p.m. in Burling Lounge. Dr. Cohn, Associate Professor of History, will discuss his book, The High Title of a Communist, published by Northern Illinois University Press in 2015. 

The High Title of a Communist analyzes the Soviet Communist Party’s system of internal discipline in the The High Title of A Communist by Ed Kohntwenty years after World War II, focusing on investigations of corruption, war-time collaboration with the Nazis, drunkenness, and sexual misconduct among Communists. Professor Cohn has now begun a new research project on the KGB’s efforts to fight dissent and political unrest in the Baltic republics of Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia. In particular, this project focuses on the tactic known as the “prophylactic conversation,” in which the KGB sought to prevent low-level offenders from becoming hardened enemies of the regime by “inviting” them to supposedly informal “conversations” or “chats.”

Edward Cohn came to Grinnell in 2007 after completing a Ph.D. in Russian history at the University of Chicago. A 1999 graduate of Swarthmore College, he worked for a year as a journalist before entering graduate school and specializes in the social and political history of the Soviet Union in the decades after World War II. Professor Cohn is also the chair of the Russian, Central, and Eastern European Studies concentration (RCEES). He travels frequently to Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union and is always happy to work with students on independent research projects related to the region.

Grinnell College welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. If you plan to attend this event and need accommodation, please contact Burling Library as soon as possible to make your request.

A Book Talk with Dr. Aysha Pollnitz

Grinnell College Libraries presents a book talk with Dr. Aysha Pollnitz on Friday, April 8, at 4:15 p.m. in Burling Lounge. Dr. Pollnitz, Assistant Professor of History, will discuss her book, Princely Education in Early Modern Britain, published by Cambridge University Press in May 2015. 

Princely Education in Early Modern Britain investigates one of the earliest attempts to use liberal Pollnitz book covereducation to effect political reform in Europe.  More specifically, it considers the fortunes of a humanist campaign, led by Erasmus of Rotterdam (c.1466-1536), to deter European princes from vainglorious warfare by teaching them knowledge of scripture and classical literature.  Erasmus’s prescriptions and curriculum had a particularly strong impact on the British isle, where humanist pedagogy transformed the upbringing of Tudor and Stuart princes between 1485 and 1649. The schooling of fifteenth-century princes had emphasized the sword but the education of Henry VIII and his successors prioritized the pen.  This shift in princely pedagogy played a critical and hitherto unappreciated role in reshaping the political and religious culture of early modern Britain.  Erasmus may have been intending to deter rulers from conquering additional territories but, in practice, his curriculum gave princes the skills and (inadvertently) the impetus to assert their supremacy over their subjects’ souls. Ultimately, a mode of education which was meant to prevent over-mighty monarchy in Europe actually taught kings and queens to extend their authority over church and state. 

Aysha Pollnitz arrived at Grinnell College in August 2013 following research fellowships at Trinity College, Cambridge and the Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington DC. She has taught at the University of Cambridge, Georgetown University, and Rice University, where she served as a resident faculty associate at Baker College. Dr. Pollnitz teaches courses on medieval and early modern European history, British history, the history of political and religious thought, on the history of sex, gender, and family, on cultural encounters, on the transmission of knowledge, and on historical method and argument. She has advised undergraduate and graduate student research on topics in British, European, and intellectual history.

Grinnell College welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. If you plan to attend this event and need accommodation, please contact Burling Library as soon as possible to make your request.

Check out JournalFinder

Need to know whether Grinnell College Libraries has access to your favorite journal, magazine, newspaper, or other periodical? Try out JournalFinder!

Under Find It! on the Libraries’ homepage, change the pull-down menu to Journals. Then type the first few words of the periodical title:

Under Find it select Journals and type in title of journal underneath.  Click Search

Hit enter, and you’ll see your journal’s availability. Our example, Colonial Latin American Review, is available through several subscriptions, including online and print formats. Click on the link of your choice for access to the journal:

Results of JournalFinder search "colonial latin america" show number of records retrieved (1) and links to where you can find issues.

Grinnell College Libraries subscribes to more than 57,000 periodicals. Explore JournalFinder to find out more!