News Releases

"Africa's Role in International Arena" symposium Apr. 9-13

Monday, Mar. 26, 2012 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA - Africa’s current and future roles in the international arena will be the focus of a week-long symposium at Grinnell College, Apr. 9-13, sponsored by the college’s Rosenfield Program in Public Affairs, International Relations and Human Rights. A former ambassador to Ethiopia, scholars of African politics and economics, and a recent leader of Africare will share first-hand experiences about the continent.

“Africa is a continent of contrasts that has tremendous importance for the rest of the world—international relations, economic growth, cultural affairs,” said Sarah Purcell, director of the Rosenfield Program. “We want to get at that importance by taking a look at Africa’s regional issues, as well as its effective relationships with the rest of the world.”

The week-long symposium will include the following free, public events to be held in Room 101 of the Joe Rosenfield ’25 Center on the Grinnell campus (unless otherwise noted):

  • Mon., Apr. 9, 8 p.m.: Lahra Smith, assistant professor in Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service, will discuss “Old Trade-Offs and New Realities: Challenges of Economic Development and Political Reform in Africa” in Alumni Recitation Hall, Room 302.
  •  Tues., Apr. 10, 4:15 p.m.: Boniface Dulani, a member of the faculty at the University of Malawi, will consider recent political movements in “Neither Consolidating nor Fully Democratic: The Evolution of African Political Regimes, 1999-2008.”
  •  Wed., Apr. 11, 4:15 p.m.: Africa’s place in the arts world will be the topic for Kelly Askew, associate professor of anthropology and Afroamerican/African Studies at the University of Michigan, in “Poetry and Politics along the Indian Ocean Littoral.” Askew is also director of Michigan’s African Studies Center.
  •  Wed., Apr. 11, 8 p.m.: Ambassador David Shinn, former U.S. ambassador to Burkina Faso and Ethiopia, will compare “China and Africa: An Evolving Relationship.” Shinn is adjunct professor at the Elliott School of International Affairs at the George Washington University.
  •  Thurs., Apr. 12, 11 a.m.: Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow Julius Coles will deliver the Scholars’ Convocation on “Prospects for Africa in the 21st Century.” Coles, the former president of Africare, is director of Morehouse College’s Andrew Young Center for International Affairs.
  •  Thurs., Apr. 12, 4:15 p.m.: The role of women will be the topic of a talk by Pearl Robinson, associate professor of political science at Tufts University, in “African Muslim Women and Civic Islam.”
  •  Fri., Apr. 13, noon: The symposium will close with a lecture in South Lounge of the College Forum by Assefa Mehretu, professor of geography at Michigan State University. Mehretu, who is also director of the Center for Integrative Studies in Social Science at Michigan, will discuss “The Rise and Decline of America's Soft-Power in Africa: The Case of Ethiopia.”

The African and Caribbean Students Union will host a film festival in connection with the symposium, offering “Umkhungo” at 8 p.m. on Apr. 12; “Teza” at 7 p.m. on Apr. 14; and “Ties that Bind” at 4:15 p.m. on Apr. 15. All films will be shown in Alumni Recitation Hall, Room 302.

For more information about the symposium, contact Sarah Purcell, purcelsj@grinnell.edu, 641-269-3091. Grinnell welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. Information on parking and accessibility is available on the college website. Accommodation requests may be made to Conference Operations at 641-269-3235 or calendar@grinnell.edu.

-30-

"1966 Yearbook Project" exhibition takes trip back in time via latest digital technology

Wednesday, Apr. 4, 2012 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA - In the days before personal computers, cell phones and email came the yearbook “Grinnell College – 1966,” deemed too controversial and banned from publication by the college until 1986. Photographed by Grinnell alumni Henry Wilhelm and the late John Phillips with contributions from fellow students John Wolf and Robert Hodierne, the yearbook was created as a photographic documentary of life in and out of the classroom at Grinnell during the mid-1960s, a time that soon led to major cultural and political turmoil on campuses and in society.

As part of a project to digitally re-master the 1966 yearbook for free worldwide online distribution, more than 100 high-quality, large-format photographs selected from the yearbook will be exhibited at Grinnell’s Faulconer Gallery, Apr. 13-June 3. The black-and-white images have been digitally printed from high-resolution scans of the photographers’ original 35mm negatives, preserved by Wilhelm for more than 45 years.

Wilhelm is an internationally recognized expert on photographic preservation and director of research at Wilhelm Imaging Research, Inc. in Grinnell. He has been a preservation consultant to numerous collecting institutions, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Corbis documentary photography collections owned by Bill Gates. In 2007, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Photoimaging Manufacturers and Distributors Association for his work on the evaluation of the permanence of traditional and digital color prints. In 2011, he received an honorary doctor of science degree from Grinnell.

A series of free, public exhibition programs, sponsored by Grinnell College and Faulconer Gallery, will provide background on the yearbook project and insight into the technological transformations making it accessible to the public. All events will be held in Faulconer Gallery unless otherwise noted.

  • Apr. 13, 4:15 p.m.: A panel discussion by college trustee Harold Fuson, an authority on freedom of the press; Wolf, who co-authored the yearbook’s text; attorney Michael Horwatt; and Wilhelm will focus on the book’s innovations, controversies and eventual publication. The discussion, moderated by Grinnell President Emeritus George Drake who arranged to publish the yearbook in 1986, will include First Amendment rights and the exercise and restraint of those rights at colleges and universities. Fuson, former editor of the college newspaper, lawyer, and journalist, is the author of “Telling it All: A Legal Guide to the Exercise of Free Speech.” Horwatt represented Phillips and Wilhelm in 1966 in negotiations with the college about the banned yearbook. 
  • April 13, 6-7 p.m.: Opening reception. • Apr. 24, 4:15 p.m.: “The Forbidden Text” reading and panel discussion by Grinnell College students, faculty and staff who will read from censored or banned texts and explore issues of censorship and technology. 
  • May 3, 4:15 p.m.: Gallery talk by Wilhelm about the changing technologies of photography, printing and image storage since the 1960s.


Concurrent with the “1966 Yearbook Project” are three special exhibitions in campus galleries: civil rights photographs by John Phillips in Burling Gallery and John Chrystal Center, and a related Burling Gallery exhibit of activism photos and memorabilia organized by members of classes from 1967 to 1973. The Phillips’ prints, selected from two portfolios of work acquired by Faulconer Gallery, include photographs taken in 1965 of Martin Luther King Jr.’s historic voting rights protests in Selma, Ala.

A set of prints of the 501 photographs in the yearbook will become part of the college’s permanent collection, and a high-resolution Adobe Acrobat PDF/A archival format digital edition of the book will also be created for online distribution. Supporters of these projects include Grinnell College, the late John Phillips, Henry, Carol, and Charlie Wilhelm, and the staff of Wilhelm Imaging Research, with assistance from Canon and ScanCafe.

Faulconer Gallery, located in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, 1108 Park St. on the Grinnell campus, is open Tuesday-Wednesday, noon to 5 p.m., Thursday-Friday, noon to 8 p.m., Saturday-Sunday, noon to 5 p.m.; closed Monday. For more information about the photographers, exhibition and related programs, call 641-269-4660 or visit www.grinnell.edu/faulconergallery.

-30-

"Listening, Learning, Leading on the Global Stage" by World Food Prize lecturer Jo Luck

Monday, Sep. 26, 2011 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA - 2010 World Food Prize laureate Jo Luck, president of Heifer International, will deliver a public lecture at Grinnell College on Wed., Oct. 12 about her experiences in leading the world hunger assistance organization. Her lecture, “Listening, Learning, Leading on the Global Stage,” will be held at 5:30 p.m. in Harris Center Cinema on the Grinnell campus. A light buffet dinner will precede in the Harris Center atrium. At 6:30 p.m., following the lecture, there will be a public reception in the atrium with music by Too Many Strings Band.

Luck served as president and CEO of Heifer International from 1992 to 2010, and director of international programs from 1989 to 1992. Under her leadership, the organization, which brings food- and incoming-producing livestock to impoverished families, grew from 20,000 to 500,000 supporters and expanded scope of efforts throughout Africa, the Americas, Asia and the South Pacific, and Central and Eastern Europe.

Grinnell has hosted World Food Prize lecturers for more than six years as part of a World Food Prize outreach program at Iowa educational institutions during the week the prize is awarded. The 2011 World Food Prize will be awarded at the state capitol Oct. 13 to John Agyekum Kufuor, former president of Ghana, and Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, former president of Brazil, who led significant hunger and poverty reduction efforts in their respective countries.

Luck’s lecture is sponsored by the Rosenfield Program in Public Affairs, International Relations, and Human Rights. Harris Center is located at 1114 10th Ave. on the Grinnell campus. For more information about the Rosenfield Program, contact Sarah Purcell, purcelsj@grinnell.edu, 641-269-3091. Grinnell welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. Information on parking and accessibility is available on the college website. Accommodation requests may be made to Conference Operations at 641-269-3235 or calendar@grinnell.edu.

-30-

"Live in HD" bringing the Metropolitan Opera to Harris Center

Friday, Feb. 10, 2012 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA - Grinnell College has partnered with New York City’s Metropolitan Opera to offer the final three shows of the 2011-12 season “Live in HD” at the Harris Center Cinema on the Grinnell campus. Each show will be preceded by a half-hour opera talk by Jennifer Williams Brown, associate professor of music at Grinnell.

On Sat., Feb. 25, the Italian opera “Ernani,” composed by Giuseppe Verdi, will be presented with English subtitles. Audience members should plan to arrive by 11:30 a.m. for the opera talk, with the performance to begin at noon.

The French opera “Manon,” composed by Jules Massenet, will be performed on Sat., Apr. 7. Audience members should arrive by 10:30 a.m. for the opera talk, with the English-subtitled performance to begin at 11 a.m.

Verdi’s “La Traviata” will be performed on Sat., Apr. 14 at noon, with the opera talk to begin at 11:30 a.m. The opera will be sung in Italian with English subtitles.

Synopses of the shows are available at http://www.metoperafamily.org/metopera/history/stories/. Details for the 2012-13 “Live in HD” season will be announced at a later date.

Tickets are required for each performance and can be purchased at the Harris Center on the day of the show: $15 for adults, $10 for students. Tickets will also be on sale at the Pioneer Bookshop in downtown Grinnell, beginning Feb. 17. For ticket questions, call 641-269-3235.

Harris Center is located at 1114 10th Ave., with available parking east of the center on 10th Ave. Grinnell welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. Information on parking and accessibility is available on the college website. Accommodation requests may be made to Conference Operations at 641-269-3235 or calendar@grinnell.edu.

-30-

"Family Album" reconstructs memories at Faulconer Gallery

Friday, Jun. 10, 2011 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA - Family photos, old and new, reconstruct memories in the summer exhibition opening at Grinnell College’s Faulconer Gallery on June 24.

Using digital photographic techniques, California-based artist Liz Steketee offers creative insights into the art of photographs that explore the dynamics of family life and the lasting effects of memories. The artist combines old and new family photographs as a means of revisiting “the epic scenery of the everyday,” documenting her life as a wife and mother, and “the joy, the agony, and the irony of life’s experiences.”

“‘Family Album’ makes an immediate connection with gallery visitors because nearly everyone has or takes family photos,” said Daniel Strong, curator of the exhibition and associate director of the gallery. “Many of the scenes depicted in Steketee’s works will be familiar: family gatherings, trips to the beach and to the ice cream parlor, or sitting at home in front of the TV.

“We also hope the exhibition will encourage visitors to experiment in their everyday lives with photography’s creative potential. Not everyone is inclined to draw or paint but everyone takes pictures, and thanks to the genius of a camera on every cellphone, we’re all artists now.” Faulconer Gallery will host several “Family Album” public events this summer:

  • Fri., June 24, 11 a.m.: exhibition opens.
  • Sun., June 26, 3 p.m.: flute and piano concert with Rebecca Stuhr and Royce Wolf.
  • Thursdays, June 30-Aug. 18, 12:15-12:50 p.m.: yoga with Monica St. Angelo.
  • Sun., July 24, 3 p.m.: concert by Turlach Ur, including traditional and contemporary bagpipe tunes
  • Thurs., Aug. 4, 5-7 p.m.: Families@Faulconer, an exhibition and reception for young artists who created work during summer outreach programs.
  • Fri., Aug. 26, 4:15-6 p.m.: “Family Album” back-to-campus reception.
  • Thurs., Sept. 1, 4:15 p.m.: gallery talk by artist Liz Steketee.

“Family Album” is open June 24 through Aug. 21 during summer gallery hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; closed Monday. From Aug. 23 to the exhibition closing on Sept. 4, “Family Album” will be open during regular gallery hours: Tuesday-Wednesday, noon to 5 p.m., Thursday-Friday, noon to 8 p.m., Saturday-Sunday, noon to 5 p.m.; closed Monday. For more information about the exhibition and related programs, call 641-269-4660 or visit www.grinnell.edu/faulconergallery.

-30-

"Can China Save the World?" convocation by modern China historian Karl Gerth '88

Monday, Sep. 19, 2011 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA - Modern China historian Karl Gerth will question “Can China Save the World?” at a Scholars’ Convocation on Thurs., Sept. 29 at 11 a.m. in Room 101 of the Joe Rosenfield ’25 Center on the Grinnell College campus.

Drawing on research in his latest book, “As China Goes, So Goes the World: How Chinese Consumers are Transforming Everything,” Gerth explains how—from brand choice to environmental quality—citizens around the world are affected by the everyday choices made by the Chinese population.

Gerth, a 1988 Grinnell graduate, has conducted research in China and Japan for more than 25 years, with special interests in consumerism, nationalism, environmentalism, and everyday life under communism. His previous book, “China Made: Consumer Culture and the Creation of the Nation,” focused on the role of nationalism in forming a consumer culture in pre-World War II China. He currently teaches at the University of Oxford, where he is a fellow and tutor at Merton College.

Gerth’s Grinnell lecture is part of the college’s ongoing Scholars’ Convocation series. Grinnell welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. Information on parking and accessibility is available on the college website. Accommodation requests may be made to Conference Operations at 641-269-3235 or calendar@grinnell.edu.

-30-

"Kind Favor, Kind Letter" exhibition open at Faulconer Gallery

Friday, Jan. 14, 2011 12:00 am

Grinnell, IA - “Kind Favor, Kind Letter, “ a collaborative exhibition by Grinnell College faculty artist Lee Emma Running; Tatiana Ginsberg of Mount Holyoke College; and Santa Fe sculptor Kate Carr, will open Jan. 28 at Grinnell College’s Faulconer Gallery.

The installation of handmade paper, fabric, thread, and pre-printed material is based on the artists’ previous collaborative exhibition at Pyramid Atlantic Art Center in 2009. The three first worked together while training as papermakers at the University of Iowa Center for the Book.

“Hand-making paper is an aesthetic we learned together,” Running said. “The techniques have informed our practices as individual artists. We didn’t need to speak when making paper; our unspoken gestures were our dialogue.”

Gestures also play into the exhibition title, which is based on symbols or gestures from Gregg Shorthand, a phonetic writing system once used for speedy note-taking. The three artists wrote letters to one another as they began their collaboration, and their letters influenced the work on display in the Grinnell installation. “The text connected us across the country, and the garlands in the exhibition represent that connection,” Running said.

The three artists gathered in Grinnell in early January to install the works together. “We wanted to build an environment for the site-specific installation instead of discrete works. And we wanted to bring the show to Grinnell because of the collaborative model so student artists can see how they can stay connected to other artists,” Running said. Her works of paper will also be on display at Upper Iowa University and in Kansas City this spring.

Faulconer Gallery events related to “Kind Favor, Kind Letter” include:

  • Jan. 28, 4:15-6 p.m.: Opening reception.
  • Feb. 15, 4:15 p.m.: Gallery talk by Lee Emma Running, assistant professor of art, Grinnell College.
  • Mar. 2, 7:30 p.m.: Open mic night co-sponsored by Grinnell College Libraries
  • Mar. 10, 4:15 p.m.: “Unmapped Topography” gallery talk by Tatiana Ginsberg, Mount Holyoke College.
  • Thursdays, beginning Feb. 3, 12:15-12:50 p.m.: yoga in the gallery with Monica St. Angelo

“Kind Favor, Kind Letter” runs through Mar. 20 concurrent with “Of Fables and Folly,” an exhibition by South African artist Diane Victor. “Kind Favor, Kind Letter” is coordinated by Daniel Strong, associate director of Faulconer Gallery, and will be on display during regular gallery hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday, Sunday: noon – 5 p.m.; Thursday, Friday: noon – 8 p.m. or by appointment. All exhibition events are held in Faulconer Gallery in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts on the Grinnell campus, unless otherwise noted. For more information about the exhibition and related programs, call 641-269-4660 or visit www.grinnell.edu/faulconergallery.

-30-

"Culturing Community: Projects About Place" opening at Faulconer Gallery

Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 11:30 am

GRINNELL, IA—Four exhibitions—united by a sense of community—will open Sept. 24 at Grinnell College’s Faulconer Gallery.

“‘Culturing Community: Projects about Place’” will “literally and figuratively bring the community of Grinnell into the art museum,” said Lesley Wright, director of the Faulconer Gallery and curator of the exhibitions.

Subscribe to RSS - News Releases