Scholarships and Fellowships

The Office of Social Commitment has responsibility for administering many of the college's scholarship and fellowship application processes. This includes both awards that Grinnell gives as well as national, merit-based scholarships and fellowships. However, some internal scholarships are administered by other offices and departments on campus; if you are looking for a specific opportunity and do not see it listed below, please contact Doug Cutchins for assistance. For more information on any of the scholarships listed below, please click on the scholarship name. (Not all are activated) Please note that these scholarships are merit-based, and should not be considered a substitute for financial aid. Students with financial aid needs should contact the Financial Aid Office. International students should see this page.

Frederick Baumann Essay Prize

The Frederick Baumann Prize recognizes excellence in education by encouraging Grinnell college students to explore ideas and society in an interdisciplinary and historical context. Established in 1993 and funded by David '51 and Audrey Lowe '52 Hammer, the prize distinguishes the dynamic classroom contributions of Frederick Baumann, professor of history at Grinnell from 1927 to 1954. The prize is awarded each spring to the student who writes the best essay -- taking an interdisciplinary and historical approach -- on the general topic of "Ideas and Society."

Frederick Baumann

{C}Frederick Baumann

Frederick Baumann joined the Grinnell faculty in 1927. He retired in 1954 but continued to teach one course each year until 1966. Born and raised in Elgin, Ill., Baumann received a Ph.D. in English and a M.A. in history from the University of Chicago, as well as a Ph.D. in history from Cornell University. He studied under noted historians at Chicago and Cornell: James Westfall Thompson, Preserved Smith, and Carl Becker. He was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, the American Historical Society, the Iowa Historical Society, and the Far Eastern History Association. In May 1917, Baumann enlisted in a Red Cross ambulance unit. He served in Italy and in 1919 was awarded the Italian Cross of Merit. After the war, he taught at the New Mexico Military Institute and Carleton College before joining the faculty at Grinnell. He died June 30, 1967, of a heart attack.

The Award

It is appropriate that a $2,500 prize offered in Baumann's memory emphasizes the history of ideas. Baumann was particularly interested in the relationship of ideas to society. As a historian, he believed that every movement of ideas, every intellectual discipline, was rooted in changing social realities. His famous course, "History D10, Evolution of the European Mind and Society," which he taught until 1960, dealt with the social and historical basis of religious, political, and scientific ideas. Baumann's intellectual interest in the Renaissance -- especially in the Utopian ideas of Sir Thomas More -- reflected his concern with the changing role of religion in post-medieval European society. Baumann taught an interdisciplinary course, "Historical Studies," until 1966. His attention to the American historian Charles Beard -- whose famous book about the economic interpretation of the constitution revolutionized American historical thinking -- reflected his own belief that economic realities underlay most political ideas. Vivid speech and strong metaphors were Baumann's forte. One of his former students, Mike Alft '49, created a list of "Baumannisms" -- Baumann's observations about many things. A few of his more notable epigrams are:

  • "I say what I think, and I say it emphatically."
  • "When you use a tool, remember the tool shapes you as much as the object upon which the tool is employed."
  • "Knowledge isn't appreciated until it is labored over. Read the book!"
  • "History is life, human life. You are nothing except as history has entered into you. Life is not rational or logical, but historical."
  • "Political institutions are nothing when confronted with economic realities."
  • "Seniors, hail and farewell. The world which you are about to enter is hard, crass, selfish, and brutal, and most of you aren't prepared for it."

Although humor embellished his classes, Baumann challenged students and pressed them to do their best. He maintained a lasting concern for honesty, integrity of spirit, and vigorous intellectual discipline. Baumann was determined to teach students to think, more than once observing that most people thought they were thinking when they were merely conscious. A strong individualist, Baumann believed it was important to shake his students into examining things apart from an inherited perspective.

Application and Selection Criteria

Students from any department and any class may compete for the $2,500 prize which is awarded to the student who writes the best essay on the general topic of "Ideas and Society," taking an interdisciplinary and historical approach. The prize is awarded each spring if, in the opinion of the judges, there is an entry of prize-winning caliber. For the purposes of this contest, an essay may be defined as a prose discourse on a well-defined subject that presents in a stimulating, entertaining, as well as informative way the personal view of the author.  Essays can be based on course work or independent study but should not be work previously submitted in connection with a course. Essays should be 15 to 20 double-spaced pages.  All applicants are encouraged to take their essays to the Writing Lab for assistance. Students who wish to enter an essay in this competition should submit the following to the Office of Social Commitment, 1127 Park St., by Monday, February 17, 2014 at 5:00 pm.

An interdisciplinary committee of three faculty members will judge the essays.

Past Baumann Essay Prize Winners

Examples of past winning essays are available online.

  • 2012-13: Micah Nelson '14: "The Social Appropriation of Legacy : A Symptom of Elite Control in American Society"
  • 2011-12: Laura Stamm '12: "'Personal Problems are Political Problems': The Gendered History of Disordered Eating"
  • 2010-11: Erica Seltzer-Schultz '12 and Michael Goldfein '12: "Zionism, Liberalism, and Young American Jews: How Redefining the American Zionist Could Help Bring Peace to the Middle East"
  • 2009-10: Joseph Maloney '12, "Managing the Faithful: The Internal Labor Market of the Roman Catholic Church."
  • 2008-09: Katherine Lee '09, "Transcendence and Myth in Science and Religion."
  • 2007-08: Nathan Redman '09, "Assaying Our Western Inheritance: Enlightenment Ideals and the Case of Haiti."
  • 2006-07: Alexandra Kieffer '08, "Music and Metaphor: Legacies of Representation in Abstract Instrumental Music"
  • 2005-06: Desire Takawira '06, "Speaking Without Fear: How DId Zimbabwe Come to This?"
  • 2004-05: Uday Chandra '06, "On Ethics and Economics"
  • 2003-04: Elizabeth Allan '04, "The Monumental Shift: Poetry, Politics, and the New Aesthetic Order in American Memorial"
  • 2002-03: Rachael A. Copland '05, "On the Necessity of the First Amendment: The Possibility of Progress in Society Today"
  • 2001-02: Joseph C. Hansen '05, "The 'Unwieldy and Overgrown Establishment': The Lack of Aristotelian Moderation in 21st Century America"
  • 2000-01: Melissa Yates '01, "Between Poetry and Positivism: Alexis de Tocqueville's 'Social Science.'"
  • 1998-99: Michal Dziegieliwski '99, "The Rwandan Genocide: Historical Narratives and Ethnic Violence"
  • 1996-97: Thomas Taylor '98, "Memetics: A New Model of the Evolution of Ideas"
  • 1993-94: Jill Cetina '94, "Public Discourse and Social Tolerance: New Ideas for Russian Society"

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Beinecke Scholarship

Each Beinecke Scholar receives $4,000 immediately prior to entering graduate school and an additional $30,000 while attending graduate school. There are no geographic restrictions on the use of the scholarship, and recipients are allowed to supplement the award with other scholarships, assistantships and research grants. Scholars are encouraged to begin graduated study as soon as possible following graduation from college, and must utilize all of the funding within five years of completion of undergraduate studies. Historically, the Beinecke selection committee favored students planning to attend graduate school in the traditional liberal arts disciplines, but also made awards to students planning to attend graduate school in mathematics and the natural sciences. In 1998, the board of The Sperry Fund decided to limit eligibility for the award to students planning to attend graduate school in the arts, humanities and social sciences.

Conditions of Eligibility

To be eligible for a Beinecke Scholarship, a student must:

  • Have demonstrated superior standards of intellectual ability, scholastic achievement and personal promise during his or her undergraduate career.
  • Be a college junior pursuing a bachelor's degree during the 2013-2014 academic year. "Junior" means a student who plans to continue full-time undergraduate study and who expects to receive a baccalaureate degree between December 2014 and August 2015.
  • Plan to enter a master's or doctoral program in the arts, humanities or social sciences. Students in the social sciences who plan to pursue graduate study in neuroscience should not apply for a Beinecke Scholarship.
  • Be a United States citizen or a United States national from American Samoa or the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.
  • Have a documented history of receiving need-based financial aid during his or her undergraduate years. Primary evidence of meeting this criterion is a student's history of receiving need-based institutional, state or federal grants-in-aid. An institutional financial aid officer will be required to complete a Financial Data Sheet certifying that the student meets this criterion. The amount or level of financial need demonstrated by the student will be one of the factors considered during the selection process, and preference is given to candidates for whom the awarding of a scholarship would increase the likelihood of the student's being able to attend graduate school. If you received merit-based scholarships or awards (such as a Trustee Honor Scholarship) that replaced need-based aid, then you may also be eligible.

Application deadline

The on-campus deadline for applications for Grinnell's nomination for the Beinecke Scholarship is 5:00 pm on Tuesday, January 21, 2014. Grinnell may nominate one student for this award. The final deadline for the nominee's application to the Beinecke Foundation is February 21, 2014. Completed applications should be submitted to Doug Cutchins, director of social commitment, 1127 Park St.

Elements of Application

Students interested in applying for Grinnell's nomination for the Beinecke Scholarship should submit the following materials before the deadline stated above:

  • Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver.
  • A completed application form.
  • A completed Financial Aid data sheet, completed in collaboration with (and signed by) Grinnell's Financial Aid office.
  • Current resume.
  • A personal statement of 1,000 words or less describing your background, interests, plans for graduate study and career aspirations. The statement should include a discussion of some experiences and ideas that have shaped those interests, plans and aspirations.
  • Three letters of recommendation from faculty members that assess the nominee's intellectual curiosity, character and potential for advanced graduate study.
  • An unofficial copy of your transcript.

For the on-campus nomination process, please ensure all application documents comply with these submission guidelines. Applicants should also review this advice on writing personal statements, and advice from Joe Schall on writing personal statements.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Past Scholars

Grinnell College nominees who have won the Beinecke Scholarship are:

  • Sarah J. Purcell (1991)
  • Jonathan C. Edel (1998)
  • Rachel L. Melis (2000)
  • Ilana Meltzer (2004)
  • Holly Lutwitze (2007)
  • Mateo Jarquin (2012)

Frequency: Annually        

Boren Scholarship

Program Information

Boren Scholarships provide up to $20,000 to U.S. undergraduate students to study abroad in areas of the world that are critical to U.S. interests and underrepresented in study abroad, including Africa, Asia, Central & Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin American, and the Middle East. The countries of Western Europe, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand are excluded. For a complete list of countries, click here. Boren Scholars come from a variety of academic backgrounds, but all are interested in studying less commonly taught languages, including but not limited to Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, and Swahili. For a complete list of languages, click here. Boren Scholarships are funded by the National Security Education Program (NSEP), which focuses on geographic areas, languages, and fields of study deemed critical to U.S. national security. Applicants should identify how their study abroad program, as well as their future academic and career goals, will contribute to U.S. national security, broadly defined. NSEP draws on a broad definition of national security, recognizing that the scope of national security has expanded to include not only the traditional concerns of protecting and promoting American well-being, but also the challenges of global society, including sustainable development, environmental degradation, global disease and hunger, population growth and migration, and economic competitiveness.

Award Amounts

Maximum scholarship awards are $10,000 for a semester and $20,000 for a full academic year

Length of Study

Boren Scholarships promote long term linguistic and cultural immersion, and therefore study abroad proposals for two or more semesters are strongly encouraged. Preference will be given to undergraduate applicants proposing a full-year academic study. Summer-only programs must be eight (8) weeks or more and are limited to science, technology, engineering and mathematics students. Boren-funded programs can begin no earlier than June 1, 2014.

 

National Security Service Requirement

The program focuses on geographic areas, languages, and fields of study deemed critical to U.S. national security. It draws on a broad definition of national security, recognizing that the scope of national security has expanded to include not only the traditional concerns of protecting and promoting American well-being, but also the challenges of global society, including: sustainable development, environmental degradation, global disease and hunger, population growth and migration, and economic competitiveness. All applicants must demonstrate how their study programs and future goals are connected to this broad understanding of national security. The NSEP Service Requirement stipulates that an award recipient work in the Federal Government in a position with national security responsibilities. The Departments of Defense, Homeland Security, State, or any element of the Intelligence Community are priority agencies. If an award recipient demonstrates to NSEP that no appropriate position is available in one of these agencies, the award recipient must seek to fulfill the requirement in a position with national security responsibilities in any Federal department or agency. Approval of service outside of a priority agency is contingent upon satisfactory demonstration of a full and good faith effort in accordance with conditions established by NSEP. If an award recipient demonstrates to NSEP that no appropriate position is available in the Federal Government, the award recipient may petition NSEP to fulfill the requirement. The education option is available only after exhausting all opportunities to fulfill the requirement in the Federal Government in accordance with conditions established by NSEP. The duration of the NSEP Service Requirement is one year or the duration of assistance provided under the program, whichever is longer. Boren Scholars must begin fulfilling the service requirement within three years of graduation. For more details and a list of Frequently Asked Questions about the NSEP Service Requirement, click here.

Program Preferences

Boren Scholarships are awarded with preference for countries, languages, and fields of study critical to U.S. national security. Preference is also given to students who will study abroad for longer periods of time, and who are highly motivated by the opportunity to work in the federal government. As we cannot list all countries, languages, and fields that are critical to U.S. national security, we are interested in applications that fall outside the preferences, if the candidate can make a compelling case that such study can contribute significantly to U.S. national security and the goals of the program.

Eligibility

You are eligible to apply for the Boren Scholarship if you are:

  • A U.S. citizen at the time of application.
  • A high school graduate, or have earned a GED, and are matriculated in an undergraduate degree program in a U.S. post-secondary institution, including universities, colleges and community colleges accredited by an accrediting body recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.
  • Applying to engage in a study abroad experience in a country outside of Western Europe, Canada, Australia, or New Zealand that meets home institution standards.
  • Planning to use the scholarship for study abroad, and the study abroad program ends before you graduate. Boren Scholarships are not for study in the United States.

 

Application Process

Although Boren Scholarship candidates do not have to be endorsed by Grinnell College, applicants who go through their college review process have a decided advantage over those who do not go through the review. Additionally, there is no limit to the number of students Grinnell can endorse, and we plan to endorse all qualified, eligible candidates. We therefore highly recommend that you apply for Grinnell's endorsement in the Boren Scholarship competition and do not apply as an at-large candidate. To apply for Grinnell's endorsement, please submit the following materials to the Office of Social Commitment, 1127 Park St., by 5:00 pm on Monday, January 27, 2014

  • An online, completed Boren Scholarship application. The application has three sections (click on the following for advice on completing each section): a study abroad program section, a budget section, and two statements of purpose. You do not need to print this off; when you submit the application electronically, it will become accessible to Grinnell's Boren Scholarship campus representative. He will also be able to "unsubmit" the application back to you for further revisions until the national deadline.
  • At least two, but no more than three letters of recommendation (click here for the letter of recommendation form). These should be submitted either by email to the Boren Scholarship campus representative or (preferably) in hard copy to 1127 Park St. If referees wish, they may give the letters to the scholarship applicant in a sealed envelope, signed across the flap. Letters may be addressed to "The Boren Scholarship Selection Committee."
  • An official transcript, which can be obtained from the Registrar's Office. Please note that official transcripts often take a few days to obtain. If you have attended other colleges or universities, you must also provide transcripts from these institutions.
  • A one-page study abroad program description with cost information. (This may be a page from the program's website or a photocopy of part of the program brochure.) Or, if you set up a direct enrollment or individually arranged study abroad program, please provide two letters of support. The first letter should be from your home institution and the second letter should be from your overseas host institution.
  • A Language Assessment Form. Boren offers this advice on completing this form.
  • (Optional) A Language Proficiency Form, completed by a foreign language instructor or other qualified evaluator
  • A Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver

In addition to the many links above to advice on completing the Boren Scholarship application, the foundation also offers these tips on what makes a competitive application.

Ethical Guidelines

All Boren Scholarship applicants are expected to follow these ethical guidelines.

Past Grinnell College Boren Scholars

Award Year Name Country of Study Program Length
1994 Rachel Erlich Israel Year
1995 Daniel Wisloski Taiwan Summer
2002 Alison Mynsberge Russia Fall
2002 Sarah Spencer China (PRC) Summer
2009 Joana Lozano China (PRC) Summer

 

Boren Scholarship Campus Representative

Doug Cutchins
Director of Social Commitment
1127 Park St.
Grinnell, IA 50112
Email: cutchins[at]grinnell[dot]edu, soccom[at]grinnell[dot]edu
Phone: (641) 269-4408; Fax: (641) 269-4508

Sarah Boyer '08 Community Service Fellowship

The Sarah Boyer '08 Community Service Fellowship is given to one or more currently-enrolled students each year in order to fund a community service project in the community of Grinnell. The fellowship is designed to allow one or more students to carry out a project to serve the common good. There are no restrictions on the class year of applicants, and the purpose of the fellowship is defined broadly so as to encourage student creativity about how they can best use their particular skills, talents, and interests to serve their community. In 2013-14, the fellowship amount will be $3,300; fellowship recipients may be able to pay to live in college housing, but it is considered a taxable benefit if taken. Fellows will submit either a final narrative or presentation after their summer, reflecting on what worked well; the impact that this summer had on them and their community; and what they learned, along with a final financial accounting of how the funds were spent.

About Sarah Boyer '08

"Grinnell for me was more than an outstanding liberal arts experience where I made friends with people my age from all over the world, read books, discussed theories, and made arguments it was also an opportunity to build myself a home in small town Iowa. Here, where Midwestern friendliness is the reality, my tendency to conversation led me to all kinds of characters: Homer, a 97 year old retired United Church of Christ minister, Doris who lives next door to the Phoenix, Lucille who used to do all the cosmetic work for the local funeral home, Dewy and Jo who moved here about five years ago, or Betty who spent much of her life teaching and working on the west coast and has now moved back to the home in which she was raised. When returning to Grinnell as an alumna, I not only find a host of college friends but also a community in the larger fabric of this unique Iowa town."

How to Apply

Students interested in applying for the Sarah Boyer '08 Community Service Fellowship should submit the following by 5:00 pm on Monday, April 7, 2014 to the Office of Social Commitment, 1127 Park St. 

  • A completed Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver.
  • A 3-4 page essay, double-spaced and printed single-sided, describing the project itself, whether or not there is already a perceived need in the community for what you will be doing and who perceives this need, a list of community members/organizations with whom you have consulted and how they have shaped your project idea, whether or not you will partner with any of these people/organizations for your project, desired outcomes, why you wish to undertake the project, and what this project means to you.  At the top of the first page, please list the names, class years, and email addresses for all project applicants. One of these applicants should be designated as the "Principal Applicant;" further correspondence about the project will be with this person.
  • A one-page proposed budget for using the fellowship funds. Students may pay for their living expenses (rent, food, etc.) from the project budget.
  • If your project requires you to partner with a local organization, please provide a letter from that organization stating their support for your project. Applicants are strongly encouraged to work early with organizations, since many organizations may need board approval (and some boards may only meet once a month).
  • One letter of recommendation, which can but does not have to come from a Grinnell College faculty or staff member. If multiple students are involved in the project, please have the letter written about the "Principal Applicant," named above.

Please ensure that all application materials conform with these submission guidelines. Priority will be given to projects that help establish connections, promote community, and begin conversations in the community of Grinnell; to those applicants for whom this project is their primary engagement; and to those projects that keep their applicants in Grinnell for a majority of the summer. The selection committee will interview finalists for the Sarah Boyer '08 Community Service Fellowship in mid- to late-April, and will name awardees soon thereafter.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

For More Information

Doug Cutchins
Director of Social Commitment
1127 Park St.
cutchins[at]grinnell[dot]edu
x4408

Carnegie Junior Fellowship

The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace Junior Fellowships are an extraordinary opportunity to work for a year in Washington, DC as a paid research assistant to some of the world's best scholars in the realm of international relations. According to the institution's website, "Junior Fellows provide research assistance to scholars, working on Carnegie Endowment's projects, which change year to year.  Junior Fellows have the opportunity to conduct research for books, participate in meetings with high-level officials, contribute to congressional testimony and organize briefings attended by scholars, activists, journalists and government officials." A Grinnell alum who served as a Junior Fellow, Geoff Swenson '03, compared it to attending a university with 40 professors and eight students. Fellows have the chance to work closely with senior scholars, to think deeply about international relations, and to publish their thoughts. The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace is one of the leading think-tanks in Washington, highly respected throughout the world for its thoughtful, academic responses to international crises. Junior Fellows are paid $36,000 in addition to a competitive benefits package. For the 2014-15 program year, Carnegie plans to fill Junior Fellow positions in the following fields:

  • Democracy
  • Nuclear Policy
  • Energy and Climate
  • International Economics - Economics background required
  • Middle East Studies – Native or near-native Arabic language skills essential.
  • South Asian Studies – Applicants should be comfortable with quantitative data manipulation as well as possess an interest in military issues.  Strong background in international relations, political theory, or international political economy is essential.  Note: foreign language skills not required.
  • Southeast Asian Studies - Background in politics and economics of the region and knowledge of quantitative techniques a plus.
  • Asian Studies – Mandarin Chinese reading skills a huge plus.  Japanese language skills may be helpful.
  • Russian and Eurasian Studies – Excellent Russian language skills required.

Carnegie FAQ

Eligibility

Members of the classes of 2014 and 2013 are eligible to apply, as long as they have not yet begun graduate studies. International students may apply as long as they are eligible to work in the US from August 1, 2014 through July 31, 2015, which typically means being here on an F-1 visa. The average Junior Fellow has a minimum of a 3.8 GPA and significant coursework in international relations, history, political science, economics, Russian, Arabic, or Chinese. International experience, such as a semester abroad, is preferred, as are candidates who plan a career related to International Relations. Independent study, such as a MAP, or assisting a professor with research (especially in a field related to IR) is also a great help, but is not required. Applicants must be nominated by their undergraduate institution (see below for nomination process).

Selection Criteria

According to the Carnegie website, "Applications are judged on the quality of the written essay, related academic study and/or work experience, grades, recommendations, and personal interviews." The three-page essay is by a key factor in being invited to an interview (assuming good grades and a demonstrated interest in international relations), and the interview is key to obtaining the Fellowship.

The Application Process

Grinnell may nominate two applicants for this opportunity. Applications for our nominations are due on Monday, November 18, 2013 by 5:00 pm in 1127 Park St. A completed application will consist of the following elements:

  • A completed Carnegie Junior Fellows application form
  • A one-page, double-spaced essay on why you would like to become a Junior Fellow.
  • A one- or two-page resume, including telephone number, address, extra-curricular activities and work experience.
  • Two letters of recommendation, submitted directly to Doug Cutchins, 1127 Park St. One of these should be from the candidate's major department.
  • A copy of your transcript, obtained from the Registrar's Office. This may be an unofficial copy, but should not be a copy printed off from PioneerWeb.
  • A signed Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver from Grinnell College.
  • An essay of no more than three (3) typewritten, double-spaced pages on a topic provided by the Carnegie Endowment. These topics are intended to test skills in analysis, logic, and written expression. The essays should be thought pieces, not research papers. Students should submit an essay related to their primary research program interests, although the Carnegie Endowment may ultimately select an applicant for a program outside of his/her designated primary interest or make an assignment to more than one program. Applicants must respond to the question pertaining to the program to which they are applying.  

A. Democracy Program. The United States and Europe have so many problems making their own democracies work well that they no longer have credibility to promote democracy in other parts of the world. Do you agree or disagree? Why? 

B. Nuclear Policy Program. By the year 2015 do you think there will be more than the current nine countries with nuclear weapons? If so, which ones, and why? If not, why are people who fear this wrong?

C. Energy & Climate Program. With climate change an increasingly present reality, the need to reduce carbon emissions also mounts. One obvious strategy is to price carbon emissions at their externalized marginal cost to society. Yet, with a cap-and-trade bill politically off the table, and anti-tax sentiment in the nation’s capital running high, new taxes that increase consumer tax obligations are also not in favor. What are some options for moving forward with a domestic carbon pricing given these constraints, and how could they be structured to make them more acceptable across the political spectrum?

D. Economics. China and many of the other countries in East Asia are now experiencing a slowdown in their economic growth. Is this likely to persist and what are the policy implications? [Applicants interested in the International Economics Program or the Asia Program with a focus on economics should respond to this question.] 

E. Middle East Program. In the aftermath of the Arab uprisings, some Middle East countries have entered a period of transition, while others appear to be stuck in the old pattern. First, briefly discuss which countries have definitely entered a period of transition. Secondly, select two countries in transition and discuss the salient factors influencing their transformation and what they suggest about the possibility of a democratic outcome.

F. South Asia Program. What major consequences and repercussions will the rise of India have for regional security?

G. Southeast Asia Program. China together with the more dynamic economies of Southeast Asia have performed exceptionally well despite the global financial crisis. Is this likely to persist even if there is a major recession in the U.S. and Europe? [Those interested in either the Southeast Asia Program or the Asia (China) Program should respond to the same question.]

G. Asia Program. Relations between China and Japan, between China and certain nations in Southeast Asia, and even between some ASEAN nations, have grown tense over the past year. Is this a long term trend of strategic and economic significance, given their interlinked economies, or is it a temporary phenomenon? [Applicants interested in China, Japan or Southeast Asia studies should respond to this question (G). Those with a special interest in economics should respond to question D.] 

H. Russia/Eurasia Program. Both Moscow and Washington have elevated their focus on the Asia Pacific region in recent years. Taking into account a mixed record of cooperation and tension between the U.S. and Russia since the 2009 "reset" and considering the interests of other regional actors, such as China, how best might the U.S. craft a policy toward Russia in what has been called the "Pacific Century"?

For the on-campus nomination process, please ensure that all application materials comply with these submission guidelines. Our nominating committee, comprised of professors from the Political Science and Economics departments, will interview applicants in early December and announce our two nominees before winter break. Applications are due to the Carnegie Endowment in mid-January. Candidates must apply through Grinnell College and may not apply independently.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

For More Information

For more information on this opportunity, or to have questions answered about the application process, please contact Doug Cutchins, x4408, 1127 Park St.
Candidates should not contact the Carnegie Endowment directly.
Candidates may, though, contact Grinnell alumni Geoff Swenson '03 (gswenson[at]gmail[dot]com) or Gretchen Lay '07 (gretchen.lay[at]gmail[dot]com) to learn more about their experiences as Carnegie Junior Fellows.

Churchill Scholarship

(All information copied from the Winston Churchill Foundation website.)

Established in 1959, the Winston Churchill Foundation was founded by American friends of Churchill, who wanted to fulfill his wish of always having young American graduate students at Churchill College at the University of Cambridge. The Foundation’s Scholarship Program offers American citizens of exceptional ability and outstanding achievement the opportunity to pursue graduate studies in engineering, mathematics, or the sciences at Cambridge. One of the newer colleges at the University of Cambridge, Churchill College was built in tribute to Winston Churchill, who in the years after the Second World War presciently recognized the growing importance of science and technology for prosperity and security. Churchill College focuses on the sciences, engineering, and mathematics. The first Churchill Scholarships, three in number, were awarded in 1963 and funded one year of study. Shortly thereafter the Scholarships were available either for one-year programs or for the three-year doctorate at Cambridge. In the early 1980’s the Foundation decided to support only one-year programs in order to increase the number of Churchill Scholars. In its early years the Foundation also made small travel grants to Churchill Fellows, distinguished senior faculty who would spend one year at the College. Eight of the Churchill Fellows won the Nobel Prize. The have now been some four hundred thirty Churchill Scholars. The Winston Churchill Foundation awards at least fourteen Scholarships. The one-year awards lead to the Master of Philosophy (MPhil), the Certificate of Post-Graduate Study (CPGS in a only a few fields of study), the Master of Advanced Study in Mathematics (MASM, formerly known as CASM, the Certificate of Advanced Study in Mathematics).

Criteria for Selection

The criteria for the selection of Churchill Scholars include: Exceptional academic talent and outstanding achievement, especially in the major, as indicated by course grades. The Foundation does not require a minimum GPA, but recent Churchill Scholars have had a GPA of at least 3.7 and usually have 3.9 or above. A capacity to contribute to the advancement of knowledge in the sciences, engineering, or mathematics by pursuing original, creative work at an advanced level as demonstrated by awards, prizes, research, and letters of recommendation. Applicants in the sciences and engineering will demonstrate extensive laboratory experience, internships, or other related work, while applicants in mathematics will show substantial independent work or other projects. Outstanding personal qualities. Understanding the time commitment required by research, the Churchill Foundation does not seek so-called “well rounded” applicants; instead, it seeks applicants with what we call interesting “jagged edges.” Nonetheless, it should be noted that successful applicants display a bewildering array of talents activities outside of academic pursuits, especially in music, athletics, social service, among other activities. The Winston Churchill Foundation of the United States is committed to a policy against discrimination based on sex, sexual orientation, gender, marital or parental status, race, color, religion, national origin, or disability or any other characteristic protected by law.

The Award

At least fourteen Churchill Scholarships are offered annually. The Scholarship is tenable for nine, ten or twelve months, depending on the academic program. The Churchill Scholarship is worth between $42,000 and $48,000, depending on the exchange rate. It covers all University and College tuition and fees (currently about $25,000). In addition, Churchill Scholars receive a living allowance of £10,000 if enrolled in a nine-month academic program, £12,000 if enrolled in a eleven-month academic program, and £13,000 if enrolled in a full-year academic program. They receive an allowance of up to $1,000 for travel to and from the United Kingdom, reimbursement of applications fees for a UK visa, and a personal travel allowance of $500 to allow scholars to travel around the UK, in Europe, or farther afield.  The Foundation also offers the possibility of a Special Research Grant of up to $2,000; this grant may cover travel for presentations at international conferences, short stays at another university or institute for special research, and other activities. Married students should consult with the Foundation about additional support.

Eligibility

An applicant for the Churchill Scholarship must be a citizen of the United States, either native born or naturalized, and must be a senior who is enrolled in one of the institutions participating in the Scholarship Program or a student who has recently graduated from one of those institutions. Upon taking up the Churchill Scholarship, a Churchill Scholar must be between the ages of 19 and 26, must hold a bachelor's degree or an equivalent, and may not have attained a doctorate.

How to Apply

How to apply for a Churchill Scholarship (click link for details)

Application deadline

The on-campus deadline for applications for Grinnell's nomination for the Churchill Scholarship is 5:00 pm on Monday, October 7, 2013. Grinnell may nominate one student for this award. The final deadline for the nominee's application to the Churchill Foundation is Tuesday, November 12, 2013. Completed applications should be submitted to Doug Cutchins, Director of Social Commitment, 1127 Park St.

Elements of Application

Students interested in applying for Grinnell's nomination for the Churchill Scholarship should submit the following materials before the deadline stated above:

  • Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver
  • A completed application form.
  • Three letters of recommendation from faculty members that assess the nominee's intellectual curiosity, character and potential for advanced graduate study.  Please note that the college's nominees will also need to submit a fourth letter of recommendation in support of their application.  Applicants should identify who would write that fourth letter and talk with them about the timeline for submission of this letter.
  • A letter of interest or commitment from a director of a laboratory at Cambridge, if available and if relevant.
  • An unofficial copy of your transcript.
  • Transcripts from other institutions attended.
  • Graduate Record Examination Scores on the General Test
  • A personal statement of 1,000 words or less describing your background, interests, plans for graduate study, and career aspirations. The statement should include a discussion of some experiences and ideas that have shaped those interests, plans and aspirations.

For the on-campus nomination process, please ensure all application documents comply with these submission guidelines. Applicants should also review this Advice on writing personal statements as well as this Advice from Joe Schall on writing personal statements.

Applicants must also apply for graduate admission to Cambridge by their October deadline.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Application Alternative

If studying abroad at Cambridge interests you, you might also consider applying for the Gates Scholarship.

Campus Representative

Doug Cutchins
Director of Social Commitment
1127 Park St.

Grinnell, IA 50112
phone: (641) 269-4408; fax: (641) 269-4508
cutchins[at]grinnell[dot]edu

Fischlowitz International Student Travel Fellowship

The Fischlowitz International Student Travel Fellowship is designed to enhance the experience of Grinnell College's international students by providing the opportunity to learn more about the United States through independent travel. A travel fellowship of up to $5,000 will be available each year. The fellowship is made possible through the generous support of Teresa and Merle Fischlowitz. Merle Fischlowitz '53 recalls that during his years at Grinnell, his association and friendship with many international students were among the most rewarding aspects of his education. He has always been aware that international students are an important part of the Grinnell community. Mr. Fischlowitz believes that an important part of education for international students is their opportunity to see the United States and to learn more about our culture than can be accomplished in few years of living and studying at Grinnell College. The Fischlowitz Travel Fellowship provides international students with the opportunities for both purposeful and casual exploration of the United States.

Selection Criteria

The applicant must be a degree seeking student of first, second, or third year standing at Grinnell College from a country outside of North America and not from any possession or territory of the United States. The successful candidate will demonstrate maturity, openness and planning in their applications, interviews, and recommendations. The Fellow must return to Grinnell for at least one academic year immediately following the summer travel. Travel funded by the Fellowship must include some time spent in a large metropolitan area, and must be in at least two regions (New England, Middle Atlantic, Southeastern, Pacific Northwest, South Central, Plains States, Mountain West and California) of the United States outside of the upper Midwest. Travel funded by the grant shall last at least 21 days, but no longer than 10 weeks. Travel can occur during the fall, winter, spring, and/or summer break periods. Grant recipients may begin their travel no earlier than the final day of classes in the spring semester of 2014 and must complete their travels before the final day of classes in the spring semester of 2015. Grant recipients who will be fourth-year students in 2014-15 must complete their travels in the summer of 2014 before returning to campus. Applicants are required to tie their travel together with a theme. Instead of just proposing travel to places that sound interesting, applicants must show what connects the places they wish to go and what they want to do in each place. Themes can be very broad or very narrow. Travel in each location is not limited only to the student's theme; for example, a student who travels to New York City to look at art may also visit other landmarks, such as the Empire State Building, or attend a Broadway play. Examples of possible themes include (but in no way are limited to):

  • Architecture
  • Natural wonders
  • Baseball
  • Borders
  • Public transportation
  • Cities near water
  • Food
  • The US Civil War
  • American race relations
  • Places where famous movies were filmed
  • Art
  • Religion
  • Music
  • Theater

Applicants who wish to discuss the appropriateness of their theme should meet with Doug Cutchins, x4408, cutchins[at]grinnell[dot]edu.

Further requirements

Each Travel Fellow shall keep a travel journal of his/her experiences that will be submitted to the Fellowship Committee at the end of the summer. The journal may be supplemented by other reporting forms. For example, Fellows may submit an art project, a musical composition, or a performance. Fellows are encouraged to find ways to document and share this experience with the Grinnell College community. The journal shall be kept in Office of Social Commitment and on the Fischlowitz Travel Fellowship web page for perusal by others. Existence of travel journals shall be publicized to all international students each year, regardless of whether they intend to apply for the Travel Fellowships. A selected Travel Fellow will present an on-campus colloquium in the fall semester following the travel experience. Travel funded by this Fellowship may be used only in the contiguous forty-eight states. Funds may be used only during the period of the award for transportation, lodging, food, and events or activities consistent with the spirit of the Fellowship. Up to thirty percent of the award may be retained to offset unrealized summer earnings to be applied to fees or tuition at Grinnell College during the following academic year. One purpose of this Fellowship is to provide international students the opportunity to encounter US life and culture outside of Grinnell, Iowa, and to become ambassadors of friendship for the United States. As their careers take them out into the world after Grinnell, Fischlowitz Travel Fellows have a responsibility to share their first-hand knowledge about and impressions of the US. Therefore, Fischlowitz Travel Fellows should not intend to reside in the US long-term, though they may plan to attend graduate school in this country and/or take advantage of their post-graduation OPT year of work.  As a part of their application, students certify that they do not plan to reside long-term in the United States and do not intend to immigrate here permanently. If Fischlowitz Travel Fellows decide to do otherwise later in life, they will work collaboratively with Grinnell College to repay the money they received as a Travel Fellow, thus granting a similar opportunity for future international students at Grinnell College.

Application Process

The following application materials must be submitted to the Fellowship Committee:

  • Application cover sheet, including a signed "Statement of Intent to Return to Home Country," from the Fischlowitz International Student Travel Fellowship application form, 2013-14.
  • 2-4 page essay describing motivation, learning goals, and preparation
  • Budget proposal (3 pages maximum)
  • Proposed itinerary (10 pages maximum)
  • Faculty recommendation
  • Photocopies of the applicant's passport and visa. These are to be held for safekeeping in case you lose your passport and visa while traveling on the Fischlowitz Fellowship.
  • A list of the places in the US that the applicant has already traveled to, and the length and purpose of this travel.
  • A completed and signed Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver

All applicants should follow these submission guidelines. An interview will be required of all finalists for the fellowship. The deadline for applications is Monday, February 10, 2014 by 5:00 pm in the Office of Social Commitment, 1127 Park St.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Fletcher Scholarship

This scholarship recognizes academic achievement and the breadth of a student's education in the Social Studies Division. The Harold A. Fletcher Jr. Scholarship was established through gifts to the College from students, friends, colleagues, and family of the late Harold Fletcher, Professor of Political Science at Grinnell from 1957 to 1968. Professor Fletcher was an outstanding teacher and scholar in political science who believed strongly in the liberal-arts tradition in undergraduate education. He was a most vital person whose professional and personal interests and accomplishments reflected that commitment.

Selection criteria

The Fletcher Scholarship is awarded annually to a senior social studies major with demonstrated financial aid need, at least $1500 in loans in the senior year, a GPA of at least 3.5, and who has both breadth and depth of study in the social science division.

Application deadline & elements

There is no application for the Fletcher Scholarship. The Scholarship is awarded annually by a committee consisting of the Social Studies division chair and the Director of Social Commitment. Students do not know that they are under consideration for the award until the scholarship winners are announced.

Fulbright Grants

Types of Fulbright Grants

In general, there are two types of Fulbright grants:

  • A Fulbright Full Grant, which funds one academic year of overseas study and/or research in one country
  • An English Teaching Assistantship (ETA), which funds one academic year of teaching English in one country

Details on both of these types of grants follows. Additionally, Fulbright offers several specialized grants, including Travel-Only Grants (which are usually given to graduate students, and only for Italy, Germany, and Hungary), Fulbright/mtvU Awards, Critical Language Enhancement Awards, Fulbright Business Grants (Mexico, Spain, and the Netherlands), Fulbright Journalism Grants (Germany and UK), and Country-Specific Awards to Australia (CSIRO), Ireland (Irish Language), Italy (Slow Foods and Deaf Studies), Mexico (Graduate Degree and Public Policy); and the Netherlands (Water Management)

Full Grants

Link to Fulbright's official page on Academic Full Grants

Academic or Full Grants allow students to undertake a year of study, research, and/or professional training at an academic institution in a different country. For graduating seniors, it is strongly recommended that your plan relies heavily on coursework. While this coursework may be supplemented by other experiences (internships, archival research, fieldwork, labwork, independent study, etc.), at least 50% of your time should be spent in the classroom, and it is perfectly acceptable to have a project proposal consisting solely of coursework. Indeed, many countries offer one-year taught Master's programs that may be completed on a Fulbright. Full grant applicants should plan to obtain a letter of affiliation from someone at their host institution who will oversee and guide their fellowship year. Details of the grant duration, preferred topics, preferred candidates, affiliation requirements, grant benefits, language requirements, housing, additional stipends for dependents, visa requirements, etc. are all determined on a country-by-country basis. Potential applicants should review the Country Summaries on the Fulbright website to learn more about each individual country.

English Teaching Assistantships

Link to Fulbright's official page on English Teaching Assistantships

English Teaching Assistantships (ETAs) are currently available in dozens of countries across all world regions (see link above to Fulbright website for a complete list and more details). Depending on the country, ETAs may teach in elementary or secondary schools, universities, or language centers. They are usually placed outside of capital cities, and sometimes live with host families. In some countries, ETAs may also pursue individual study and research in addition to their teaching duties. ETA candidates are rated by decision-making committees in six areas:

  • Academic merit/achievement
  • Quality of the written essays
  • Personal qualities
  • Language abilities (if required)
  • Teaching / tutoring / education experience
  • Other factors, such as community engagement, limited experience in host country, etc.)

 

Eligibility

This is a brief outline of the eligibility criteria for the Fulbright; all candidates should review the full list of eligibility criteria on the Fulbright website to ensure that they are eligible for the grant for which they are applying. Applicants must:

  • Be U.S. citizens at the time of application. Permanent residents are not eligible.
  • Hold a B.A. degree or the equivalent before the start of the grant.
  • Be in good health.

 

Benefits

Fulbright benefits are based on the cost of living in the host country, and vary by country. In general, though, Fulbright grant benefits (both Full Grants and ETAs) include:

  • Round-trip transportation to the host country
  • Maintenance for the academic year, based on living costs in the host country
  • Limited Health Benefits

In addition, Full Grants may include (see relevant Country Summary for details):

  • Book and research allowances (The allowance provides some funding for research, books, and/or supplies. Grantees with projects that require extensive research support, in-country travel, study materials, or equipment should explore additional funding from other sources to supplement the Fulbright funding.)
  • Mid-term enrichment activities in many countries or world regions
  • Full or partial tuition
  • Language study programs
  • Pre-departure and in-country orientation

For more details on Fulbright benefits, please see the Fulbright benefits webpage.

Application Process

Candidates for a Fulbright may either apply as enrolled or at-large candidates.

Enrolled candidates

Currently-enrolled Grinnell students should apply as enrolled candidates; Grinnell alumni may choose to apply as an enrolled candidate or as an at-large candidate. Enrolled canddiates must meet Grinnell's on-campus deadline of Monday, September 30, 2013 by 5:00 pm. All enrolled candidates must submit the following materials by the deadline given above:

  • 1) A completed Fulbright application, created by the Fulbright online application, including your project proposal and personal statement.  This is submitted electronically via the Fulbright website and does not need to be submitted in person.  These do not have to be final drafts of these documents, but should be solid, nearly-done drafts.  Your Campus Committee Evaluation will be written based on these drafts, so while you may continue to work on these drafts after this date, you should submit work you are proud of and which reflect your abilities.  Your application will be "un-submitted" back to you later in the week so that you may continue developing it until the national deadline two weeks later.
  • 2) Three letters of recommendation. Letters of recommendation must be submitted via the online system (once a letter is submitted via the online system, it cannot be corrected, edited, or revised). For ETA candidates: please be sure that your letter-writers know that their "letter" is actually a series of short-answer questions, and not a typical letter. They will be able to access these questions through a link that will be sent to them once you register them in your online application.
  • 3) A Grinnell College Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver.  This should be printed out, completed, and submitted in paper copy to Doug Cutchins in 1127 Park St.
  • 4) A 3-5 page paper that describes what research you have done on the country you propose to live in during your Fulbright year, and what you have found interesting about its history, culture, relationship with the United States, and educational system.  Full grant applicants should also include information about the insitution that they wish to attend during their Fulbright year.  This document will help to inform your Campus Committee Evaluation.  The most helpful and successful papers are those that show that the author has done research about the country to be visted and the systems in which they will be researching or teaching; research about current events and educational policy are generally more relevant than research about food, for example.  It is particularly helpful when students show how their personal experiences would prepare them for or give them insight into these challenges.

An example of a good Fulbright Full Grant 3-5 page paper is available, as is an example of a good Fulbright ETA Grant 3-5 page paper .

Additionally, the following materials may be required of enrolled candidates for the on-campus nomination process, depending on their country of study and area of study:

  • 5) Supplementary materials for candidates in the arts, as needed (instructions from Fulbright here).  These should be submitted in hard copy to Doug Cutchins in 1127 Park St.
  • 6) A foreign language background report, completed online, as needed.
  • 7) A foreign language assessment, completed online, as needed. Please note: due to a quirk in the Fulbright online system, if someone is submitting both a letter of recommendation and a Foreign Language Assessment on your behalf, they will have to use separate email addresses for each document (e.g., an @grinnell.edu email address for the letter of recommendation, and an @gmail.com email address for the Foreign Language Assessment).
  • 8) A letter of affiliation. Candidates for Full Grants are generally well-advised to obtain a letter of affiliation from someone at their host institution stating the nature of the relationship and that they will welcome the Fulbright applicant if s/he is offered a grant. This should be hand-signed and on letterhead, and uploaded to the Fulbright online application.

Of the above items, only #3 and #4 are submitted in hard copy; all of the other items are submitted electronically through the Fulbright online application. 

All Fulbright candidates will be required to meet 1:1 with Doug Cutchins at least once between October 1-8 to review their Fulbright essays.

To submit all of the other items in your online application, press "submit" on your online Fulbright application before the on-campus deadline. Please know that once you have taken this step, the application is not yet released to Fulbright, just to Grinnell's Fulbright Program Advisor (FPA). If you have already submitted the application online and need to revise it, please contact your FPA, who can "unsubmit" your application back to you at any time after the on-campus deadline, allowing you to continue working on it, up until the national deadline in mid-October.

At-large candidates

Grinnell College alumni are welcome and encouraged to apply through our enrolled candidate process; national statistics show that enrolled candidates win Fulbright at about twice the frequency as at-large candidates. If they so choose, however, alumni may instead apply as at-large candidates. In this case, they would skip all of the above steps and apply directly to Fulbright at the mid-October deadline; no on-campus endorsement or interview process is required. Grinnell's FPA will work with and advise alumni candidates just as if they were enrolled candidates.

Resources for Applicants

Fulbright applicants from Grinnell College may find the following materials to be helpful:

Advice from Fulbright on the application elements is arranged by the type of grant for which you are applying. Please select the type of grant for which you plan to apply and review the tips for that category of grant:

 

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Fulbright Program Advisor

Doug Cutchins
Director of Social Commitment
1127 Park St.

Grinnell, IA 50112
phone: (641) 269-4408; fax: (641) 269-4508
cutchins[at]grinnell[dot]edu 

Gates Scholarship

(All information copied from the Gates Cambridge Scholarship website.)

Gates Cambridge Scholarships are highly competitive full-cost awards for full-time graduate study and research in any subject available at the University of Cambridge. The purpose of the Trust is to enable Gates Cambridge Scholars from any part of the world outside the United Kingdom to benefit from education in the University of Cambridge. Gates Cambridge Scholarships are awarded on the following criteria:

  • Intellectual ability
  • Leadership capacity
  • A person's desire to use their knowledge to contribute to society throughout the world by providing service to their communities and applying their talents and knowledge to improve the lives of others
  • A good fit between the abilities and aspirations of the applicant and what the University of Cambridge can offer in its graduate programme

While at Cambridge Gates Scholars pursue the full range of academic disciplines and are spread throughout all 31 Colleges. All applicants for the scholarship apply for – and must gain – admission to the University of Cambridge.

Eligibility

Candidates for a Gates Cambridge Scholarship:

  • may be citizens of any country outside the United Kingdom.
  • may apply to study any subject available at the University of Cambridge.
  • may apply to pursue one of the following full-time residential courses of study:
    -PhD (three year research-only degree)
    -One year postgraduate course (e.g. MPhil, LLM, MASt, Diploma, MBA etc.)
    -MSc or MLitt (two year research-only degree)
  • must be admitted to one of the degrees above at Cambridge through the University's normal admission procedures. The Trust does not admit students.
  • must be well prepared for the Cambridge course for which they are applying and must meet all of the conditions for admission specified by the University (e.g. academic, English language proficiency, if required, and any other conditions set).
  • must be able to show evidence of high academic achievement, leadership potential, social commitment and a good fit with Cambridge.
  • who are already studying at Cambridge are only eligible to apply for a Gates Cambridge Scholarship if they are applying for a new course of study (e.g. a one year ‘MPhil only’ student may apply for funding to continue on to the PhD). Candidates already studying at Cambridge who are not applying for a new course of study (e.g. have already started their PhD) are not eligible to be considered for a Gates Cambridge Scholarship.

Application Process

How to apply for a Gates Scholarship (click link for details) Information about deadlines is available from the application timetable page. The Gates Scholarship does not require institutional nomination or endorsement from Grinnell College.  Although students are not required to work with advisors at Grinnell on their application, they are invited to meet with Doug Cutchins to review the opportunity offered by the Gates Cambridge Scholarship, to discuss a potential application, and to review their application materials.

Application Alternative

If studying abroad at Cambridge interests you, you might also consider applying for the Churchill Scholarship (above).

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Campus Representative

Doug Cutchins
Director of Social Commitment
1127 Park St.
Grinnell, Iowa  50112
phone: (641) 269-4408; fax: (641) 269-4508
cutchins[at]grinnell[dot]edu

Gilman Scholarship

All information on this page about the Gilman Scholarship is copied from the Gilman Scholarship website

The Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program offers grants for U.S. citizen undergraduate students of limited financial means to pursue academic studies abroad. Such international study is intended to better prepare U.S. students to assume significant roles in an increasingly global economy and interdependent world. International experience is critically important in the educational and career development of American students, but it can also require a substantial financial investment. The Gilman Scholarship Program broadens the student population that studies abroad by supporting undergraduates who might not otherwise participate due to financial constraints. The program aims to encourage students to choose non-traditional study abroad destinations, especially those outside of Western Europe and Australia. The Gilman Scholarship Program aims to support students who have been traditionally under-represented in study abroad, including but not limited to, students with high financial need, community college students, students in under-represented fields such as the sciences and engineering, students with diverse ethnic backgrounds, and students with disabilities. The program seeks to assist students from a diverse range of public and private institutions from all 50 states, Washington, DC and Puerto Rico. Award recipients are chosen by a competitive selection process and must use the award to defray eligible study abroad costs. These costs include program tuition, room and board, books, local transportation, insurance and international airfare.

Eligibility

The Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program is open to all U.S. citizen undergraduates, in good academic standing, who meet the criteria listed below:

  • The applicant must be receiving a Federal Pell Grant or provide proof that he/she will be receiving a Pell Grant at the time of application or during the term of his/her study abroad.
  • The applicant is applying to or has been accepted into a study abroad program eligible for credit by the student's accredited institution of higher education in the U.S.
  • The applicant is studying abroad for at least 28 days in one country. Programs going to more than one country are eligible if the student will be studying in one country for at least 28 consecutive days.
  • The applicant is studying abroad in any country except Cuba or a country on the State Department's current Travel Warning list.
  • The applicant is studying in the fall, spring, or academic year terms including winter inter-sessions. Summer only programs are not eligible.

How to Apply

How to apply for a Gilman Scholarship (click link for details) The Gilman Scholarship does not require institutional nomination or endorsement from Grinnell College, though applicants do need to obtain certification from the Off-Campus Study office they will be studying abroad and from the Financial Aid Office that they receive or are eligible to receive a Pell Grant. Although students are not required to work with advisors at Grinnell on their application, they are invited to meet with Doug Cutchins to review the opportunity offered by the Gilman Scholarship, to discuss a potential application, and to review their application materials.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Campus Representative

Doug Cutchins
Director of Social Commitment
1127 Park St.

Grinnell, Iowa 50112
phone: (641) 269-4408; fax: (641) 269-4508
cutchins[at]grinnell[dot]edu 

Goldwater Scholarship

The Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship Foundation will award undergraduate scholarships to outstanding students, to be known as Barry M. Goldwater Scholars, in the spring of 2014 for use during the 2014-2015 academic year. The awards will be made on the basis of merit to two groups of students - those who will be college juniors and those who will be college seniors in the 2014-2015 academic year - who have outstanding potential and intend to pursue careers in mathematics, the natural sciences, or engineering. Four-year institutions are eligible to nominate up to four students who are in the sophomore or junior class during the 2013-2014 academic year. Each scholarship covers eligible expenses for undergraduate tuition, fees, books, and room and board, up to a maximum of $7,500 annually. Scholarship monies not used during one academic year are not transferable to the succeeding academic year. Junior-level scholarship recipients are eligible for a maximum of two years of scholarship support, and senior-level scholarship recipients are eligible for a maximum of one year of scholarship support. The Trustees intend to award up to 300 Goldwater Scholarships. The number of scholarships to be awarded per state will depend on the number and qualifications of the nominees from the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and, considered as a single entity, Guam, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. The word "resident" as used in this context refers to a person who has legal residence in the state from which he or she is a candidate. This status might be indicated by parents' place of residence. If that criterion of residence is not relevant, the candidate's legal residence will be determined by his or her eligibility for in-state tuition rates (where applicable) and place of voter registration.

Eligibility

To be considered for nomination as a Goldwater Scholar, a student must:

  • Be a full-time matriculated sophomore or junior pursuing a degree at an accredited institution of higher education during the 2013-2014 academic year. "Sophomore" is defined as a student who plans two more years of full-time undergraduate study beginning September 2014. Sophomore nominees can expect to receive a maximum of two years of support. Students in two-year colleges who plan to transfer to a baccalaureate program at another institution may be nominated. "Junior" is defined as a student who plans one more year of full-time undergraduate study beginning September 2014. Junior nominees can expect to receive a maximum of one year of support.
  • Have a college grade-point average of at least "B" (or the equivalent) and be in the upper fourth of his or her class. (Note: though the Goldwater Scholarship only requires a 3.0 average, the typical winning applicant has a GPA in the 3.9 range)
  • Be a United States citizen, a permanent resident, or, in the case of nominees from American Samoa or the Commonwealth of the Mariana Islands, a United States national. Nominations from permanent residents must include a letter of the nominee's intent to obtain U.S. citizenship and a photocopy of the Permanent Resident Card (formerly known as the Alien Registration Card).

Selection Criteria

Successful Goldwater candidates usually meet most or all of the following selection criteria:

  • Outstanding academic work, reflected in a top-notch GPA and backed by superlative letters of recommendation.
  • A demonstrated interest in a research career.
  • Intensive scientific research experience, usually more than one summer's worth. Many candidates have one experience on-campus and one off-campus.
  • A desire to complete a terminal degree within their chosen academic field, almost always a Ph.D.

Application Process

To be considered for Grinnell's four nominations for this scholarship, please submit ONE COPY of the following materials to the Office of Social Commitment, 1127 Park St., by 5:00 pm on Monday, November 11, 2013.

  • A completed application form, which may be completed online via the Goldwater Scholarship website and then printed.
  • An essay describing your research plans, as detailed in the application form.
  • Three letters of recommendation, which may be submitted online or directly in hard-copy form to 1127 Park St.
  • An unofficial transcript from Grinnell College, obtained from the Registrar's Office (do not simply print out a grade report from PioneerWeb)
  • Any transcript(s) from other institutions that the applicant attended with grades for courses taken.
  • A completed Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver

Please ensure that all materials for the on-campus nomination process conform with these submission guidelines.

Goldwater Scholarship candidates are encouraged to read and follow this Goldwater application advice

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Jack Kent Cooke Graduate Arts Award

The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation's Graduate Arts Award enables students or recent alumni with exceptional artistic or creative promise and significant financial need to pursue up to three years of study at an accredited graduate institution in the US or abroad. Awards can be as much as $50,000 annually. In 2014, the Foundation will select up to 15 recipients for this award.

The award provides funding for tuition, room and board, required fees, and books. Scholarship amounts vary based on several factors, including cost at the institution each recipient attends and other grants and scholarships the student receives.

Eligibility

  • Senior standing or have graduated from an accredited four-year US college or university within the past five years.
  • A cumulative undergraduate grade-point average of 3.20 or better on a scale of 4.0 (or the equivalent).
  • Demonstrated significant unmet financial need.
  • A bachelor’s degree by the start of the fall 2014 semester.
  • Plans to begin their first graduate degree program in the performing arts, visual arts, or creative writing at an accredited college or university in the fall of 2014.

While the Foundation considers artistic and creative merit first in evaluating candidates, competitive applicants must also demonstrate significant unmet financial need, which has two components:

  • Education costs that are appreciably greater than the total amount of other scholarships or grant awards.
  • Insufficient student and family income to meet educational costs.

All scholarship nominees must plan to begin their first graduate degree program on a full-time basis at an accredited university in the fall of 2014. Recipients are chosen from a national pool, with approximately 200 nominees competing each year for up to 15 awards.

Grinnell College's Nomination Process

All applicants should carefully read the How to Apply page on the Jack Kent Cooke website.  Please contact Doug Cutchins if you have any questions about this process.

Applicants must first apply directly to the JKC foundation by November 27, 2013.  Those who are selected as semifinalists may then apply for one of Grinnell's two nominations.  The deadline for on-campus applications is 5:00 pm on Tuesday, January 21, 2014. A completed application will consist of the following:

1)  A completed Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver

2)  A completed Jack Kent Cooke Graduate Arts Award application, including a portfolio, graduate study proposal, resume, financial information, 500-word narrative biography, two letters of recommendation, family financial information, and a transcript.  This may be completed online, according to the instructions set out in the application.

A faculty committee will nominate two semifinalists in late January or early February, shortly before the national deadline in February

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines

Faculty Representative

Doug Cutchins, Director of Social Commitment
1127 Park St.
Grinnell, IA 50112

(641) 269-4408; cutchins[at]grinnell[dot]edu

John Young '54 Memorial Scholarship

The John Young '54 Memorial Scholarship honors the life work of John Young by providing funds to a Grinnell student to continue their education at Grinnell College. On August 3, 1990, two days after his 58th birthday, John was given the grim news that he had a brain tumor. He accepted the news, looking at it as an opportunity to work with and make the best of the situation given to him. He was never outwardly angry or scared. He underwent brain surgery three days later and spent the rest of his life trying to combat the tumor with radiation and other therapies. Even though the prognosis was not good, John returned to work in January, five months after surgery. Although it was probable that he only had a short time to live, he wanted to work. Not because he had to, but because he wanted to. To him, his mission in life at that time was to lead others to opportunity.

John loved to help other people learn and realize their goals. John was forced to stop working in late April of 1991. The brain tumor was causing him to be very disoriented and confused. Although he experienced painful headaches, he didn't complain. Many times in his disoriented state, he talked about people he was helping with commercial brokerage or training sessions he needed to arrange. John continued to want to do the work he loved.

On July 25, 1991, John passed away in his home, one week before his 59th birthday. The John Young Memorial Scholarship was founded by John's three children; Sandy, Tom and Jane. They felt that John's mission in life was incomplete. If the brain tumor hadn't cut his life short, John would have had the opportunity to help give many other people what they needed to reach their potential and achieve their goals. The scholarship is established in that spirit. It is an award to a student of Grinnell College who is chosen by the students of Grinnell College. The award is intended to be given in the spirit that it will help the recipient achieve what s/he is capable of. It is one small way in which John can continue to positively affect the careers of other people and help them achieve their goals. In 2013-14, we expect to award a total of approximately $8,900, split among several students.

Selection Criteria

  • There will be no restrictions with respect to the then current grade point average of the recipient.
  • The recipient will have a financial need for the scholarship. The scholarship is intended for a person for whom the receipt of the scholarship will make a substantive difference in his/her ability to achieve her/his career goals.
  • In the judgment of the selection committee, the recipient must be someone who emulates the teaching philosophy of John Young.
  • The recipient must be returning to Grinnell College after at least one complete year of attendance at Grinnell with an academic status of sophomore, junior or senior.
  • The recipient may be a descendant of John Young, but will not be given preferential treatment with respect to being selected.

Application Process

Applications for the John Young '54 Memorial Scholarship are due on Monday, March 31, 2014 by 5:00 pm in the Office of Social Commitment, 1127 Park St. Completed applications will consist of the following elements:

  • A completed Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver
  • Two short essays, one each on the following topics: a) Describe an event in your life when you emulated the teaching philosophy of John Young; and b) What are your career goals, and how will receiving this scholarship make a substantive difference in your ability to achieve those goals?
  • A description of your community service activities
  • A completed, signed John Young Scholarship application form

Please ensure that all application materials conform with these submission guidelines.  In particular, please be sure to print your application single-sided, and do not staple it.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

History of John Young and Philosophy of the Scholarship

John Young was a man who was committed to helping others unlock their capabilities and achieve their goals. John graduated from Grinnell College in 1954 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science. Since the time he graduated, he remained an active alumnus of the college. In 1957, after serving as an officer in the Air Force, John went into the family appliance business, Young's Appliance, in Glen Ellyn, Illinois, near Chicago. While in the appliance business, he worked with non-college-bound students in the work/study program at the local high school, Glenbard West. John became a mentor and father figure to several of these people. He gave them the opportunity to help themselves and discover that they could fend for themselves in the working world. Twenty-five years later, one of these people spoke at John's funeral, acknowledging his personal loss of a great friend and father figure.

John changed careers from the appliance business to the real estate business in 1974. He worked for Thorsen Realtors, a residential real estate brokerage until 1978 when he struck out on his own and opened a Realty World real estate office. The mission of his business was to concentrate on brokerage of surplus properties help by developers, primarily townhomes. John was establishing himself as a pioneer and maverick in the real estate business. No other Realtor in the Chicago area had ever limited its business to this niche in the real estate market. While in his business at Realty World, he helped several people learn the residential real estate business.  In addition to giving hands-on training to his employees, John also taught the Illinois State Real Estate License Course.

John's timing was unfortunate. In 1979 recession struck the United States economy. High interest rates brought the real estate business to its knees. Due to the lack of business, John had to close his Realty World office in 1981. John lost all of his assets when his business failed, but he refused to take the easy way out and claim bankruptcy. With earnings from future business and help from his parents, John repaid his debts, which were caused by the bad economy. In order to re-establish himself, John went to work for Coldwell Banker in a start up commercial real estate brokerage office. John quickly found his niche in commercial brokerage of apartment buildings. He was one of the first people in the Chicago area to accurately catalog all apartment buildings in the region, collecting information needed to provide brokerage services to individual owners and buyers of apartment buildings. At the same time, John became one of the first Certified Commercial Investment Members (CCIM) in the Chicago area and was given a position on the board of directors of the Northern Illinois Chapter of CCIM. John had, once again, taken pioneering steps in the real estate business.

Because of his unique knowledge, other professionals wanting to get into the commercial real estate brokerage business went to John so they could learn from him. John shared what he knew, including the data he had spent years collecting, with all of the people he took under his wing to train. These people were known as "runners." John trained most of the runners at that Coldwell Banker office during the seven years he was there. John became a mentor for these people. He even gave presentations to college students who were interested in learning about commercial real estate brokerage. Because of John's knowledge, experience and ever increasing love of his business, he was able to touch more and more people with this positive attitude towards giving others the opportunity to achieve their goals.

In 1988 John changed positions and accepted an offer from Prudential Real Estate Affiliates to help pioneer yet another aspect of the real estate business. He was given the responsibility for helping Prudential's residential Realtors develop commercial real estate capabilities within their residential real estate offices. This was John's greatest opportunity to do what he loved most. It was his responsibility to teach others the commercial real estate business: to help them get started in a business that John knew from the ground up. He was a person more concerned with sharing his knowledge with other people than making the next real estate deal. At Prudential, in three short years, he affected the careers of hundreds of people.

He loved to give other people what they needed to achieve their goals. At one point, John had the opportunity to administer Prudential Real Estate Affiliate's commercial brokerage business for many areas of the country. John declined that offer. The work he was currently doing as a teacher and mentor is what made him happy. That opportunity may have also required a move to Prudential's home office in California, away from his family, which was not acceptable to him. John had the same philosophy with his children that he had with the people whom he guided professionally. He would try to give his children unconditional support for what was important to them. He knew that if a person does what he or she loves to do professionally, he or she will be successful. In the words of John's favorite philosopher, Kahlil Gibran, "Work is love made visible." At every opportunity, John tried to provide his children with whatever might be needed to help them achieve their goals. His support was carefully given, so his children could find a way to make their "love visible."

For more information

Doug Cutchins
Director of Social Commitment
1127 Park St.
x4408
cutchins[at]grinnell[dot]edu

Marshall Scholarship

Official Website

(All information copied from the Marshall Scholarship website.) Marshall Scholarships finance young Americans of high ability to study for a degree in the United Kingdom. Up to forty Scholars are selected each year to study at graduate level at an UK institution in any field of study. As future leaders, with a lasting understanding of British society, Marshall Scholars strengthen the enduring relationship between the British and American peoples, their governments and their institutions. Marshall Scholars are talented, independent and wide-ranging, and their time as Scholars enhances their intellectual and personal growth. Their direct engagement with Britain through its best academic programmes contributes to their ultimate personal success. The objectives of the programme are as follows:

  • To enable intellectually distinguished young Americans, their country's future leaders, to study in the UK.
  • To help Scholars gain an understanding and appreciation of contemporary Britain.
  • To contribute to the advancement of knowledge in science, technology, the humanities and social sciences and the creative arts at Britain's centres of academic excellence.
  • To motivate Scholars to act as ambassadors from the USA to the UK and vice versa throughout their lives thus strengthening British American understanding.
  • To promote the personal and academic fulfilment of each Scholar.

Eligibility

To be eligible for a 2014 Marshall Scholarship, candidates must:

  • be citizens of the United States of America (at the time they apply for a scholarship);
  • (by the time they take up their scholarship in September 2014) hold their first undergraduate degree from an accredited four-year college or university in the United States;
  • have obtained a grade point average of not less than 3.7 (or A-) on their undergraduate degree. (Exceptions will be considered only on the specific recommendation of the sponsoring college.)
  • have graduated from their first undergraduate college or university after April 2010.
  • not have studied for, or hold a degree or degree-equivalent qualification from a British University.

Award

University fees, cost of living expenses, annual book grant, thesis grant, research and daily travel grants, fares to and from the United States and, where applicable, a contribution towards the support of a dependent spouse. Up to 40 Scholarships awarded annually.

Tenure

The traditional Marshall Scholarship is tenable for two academic years (ie 22 months), but may be extended by the Commission, though not beyond the end of a third academic year. Third-year extensions are granted by the Commission on a limited basis, for strong academic reasons, subject to the availability of funds. In addition, thanks to the generous support of the following Universities:

  • Up to two third-year extensions may be granted by the University of Edinburgh to those pursuing a doctorate at Edinburgh.
  • Up to two third-year extensions may be granted by the London School of Economics and Political Science to those pursuing a doctorate at LSE.
  • Up to two third-year extensions may be granted by the University of Nottingham to those pursuing a doctorate at Nottingham
  • Up to three third-year extensions may be granted by the University of Oxford to those pursuing a doctorate at Oxford.
  • Up to two third-year extensions may be granted by the University of St Andrews to those pursuing a doctorate at St Andrews

In addition a limited number of One Year Marshall Scholarships are available. These Scholarships are tenable for one academic year (ie 12 months) and cannot be extended.

Evaluation Criteria

Marshall Scholarship applications will be evaluated on three criteria:

  • Academic Merit (Quality of programme of study, knowledge of proposed courses and supervisors, evidence of academic background that is strong and relevant, quality and breadth of recommendations)
  • Leadership Potential (Ability to deliver results, strength of purpose, creativity, self-awareness)
  • Ambassadorial Potential (Knowledge of US/UK relations, evidence of transferrable extra-curricular activities, interpersonal skills and ability to engage with others, self-confidence and ability to seize opportunities)

Application Process

Applications are made in one of eight regions in the United States. Candidates may apply in one region only - either that in which they have their permanent home address or ordinary place of residence/employment, or that in which they are studying. How to apply for a Marshall Scholarship (click link for details)

Application deadline

Applications for Marshall Scholarships must be submitted to and endorsed by an accredited US University. The on-campus deadline for applications for Grinnell's edorsement for the Marshall Scholarship is 5:00 pm on Tuesday, September 3, 2013. The final deadline for our nominees' applications to the Marshall Scholarship is Tuesday, October 1, 2013. Completed applications should be submitted online to Doug Cutchins, Director of Social Commitment, 1127 Park St.

Elements of Application

Students interested in applying for Grinnell's nomination for the Marshall Scholarship should submit the following materials before the deadline stated above:

  • Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver
  • A completed online application.
  • Three letters of recommendation from faculty members that assess the nominee's intellectual curiosity, character and potential for advanced graduate study.  These should be submitted via the Marshall Scholarship online application.  Please note that Grinnell's nominees for the Marhsall Scholarship will need to submit a fourth letter of recommendation as a part of the national selection process.  This fourth letter-writer should be identified on your on-campus application for nomination.
  • An unofficial copy of your transcript.

For the on-campus nomination process, please ensure all application documents comply with these submission guidelines.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Campus Representative

Doug Cutchins
Director of Social Commitment

1127 Park Street
Grinnell, IA 50112

phone: (641) 269-4408; fax: (641) 269-4508
cutchins[at]grinnell[dot]edu 

Mitchell Scholarship

(All information copied from the George J Mitchell Scholarship program website.)

The Mitchell Scholars Program is a nationally-competitive fellowship sponsored by the US-Ireland Alliance. The Mitchell Scholars Program, named to honor former US Senator George Mitchell’s pivotal contribution to the Northern Ireland peace process, is designed to introduce and connect generations of future American leaders to the island of Ireland, while recognizing and fostering intellectual achievement, leadership, and a commitment to public service and community. Up to twelve Mitchell Scholars between the ages of 18 and 30 are chosen annually for one year of postgraduate study in any discipline offered by institutions of higher learning in Ireland and Northern Ireland. Applicants are judged on three criteria: scholarship, leadership, and a sustained commitment to service and community. The Mitchell Scholars Program provides tuition, housing, a living expenses stipend, and an international travel stipend.

Eligibility

Candidates for the 2014-2015 Mitchell Scholars program must meet all criteria. They shall:

  • be U.S. citizens (permanent residents and US Nationals are not eligible).
  • be 18 years of age or older, but not yet 30.
  • have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university before beginning study as a Mitchell Scholar. Degrees from international accredited universities are acceptable, if all other conditions are met.
  • While married applicants are accepted, no allowance is made for the expenses of a married applicant’s spouse or dependent.

Award

Potential candidates are urged to study the Frequently Asked Questions and the profiles of past Scholars to learn about the program, the selection process, and the qualities we seek in a Mitchell Scholar. Because the Mitchell program has only twenty national finalists for a maximum of twelve awards, we ask that upon accepting an invitation to finalist weekend, a candidate be committed to particpating in all aspects of finalist weekend and to accepting an offer from the Mitchell Scholars program if tendered. The Mitchell Scholars Program includes support for one year of study at a university on the island of Ireland. Those who prefer a multi-year academic scholarship should apply for other fellowship programs which offer multi-year awards.

Application

How to apply for a Mitchell Scholarship (click link for details) A candidate who is a full-time student at the time of application must present an institutional endorsement. Candidates must be endorsed by an institution where they have been enrolled for two years of full-time study before 1 October of the year in which they are applying (undergraduate transfer students entering their second year at an institution may secure endorsement from their current institution).

Application deadline

Applications for Mitchell Scholarships must be submitted to and endorsed by an accredited US University. The on-campus deadline for applications for Grinnell's edorsement for the Mitchell Scholarship is 5:00 pm on Tuesday, September 3, 2013. The final deadline for the nominee's application to the Mitchell Scholarship is Tuesday, October 1, 2013. Completed applications should be submitted online to Doug Cutchins, Director of Social Commitment, 1127 Park St.

Elements of Application

Students interested in applying for Grinnell's nomination for the Mitchell Scholarship should submit the following materials before the deadline stated above:

  • Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver
  • A printed version of your online application.  There is no "unsubmit" button for the Mitchell Scholarship; do NOT press "submit" at this time.  You will have an opportunity to continue working on your application after the on-campus nomination process is complete.
  • Three letters of recommendation from faculty members that assess the nominee's intellectual curiosity, character and potential for advanced graduate study.  Please note that nominees will need to submit a total of four letters as a part of the national selection process; in their on-campus application, candidates should indicate who their other letter-writer will be.
  • An unofficial copy of your transcript.
  • A copy of transcripts from any other institutions

For the on-campus nomination process, please ensure all application documents comply with these submission guidelines. Applicants should also review this advice on writing personal statements, as well as refer to this advice from Joe Schall on writing personal statements.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Campus Representative

Doug Cutchins
Director of Social Commitment

1127 Park St.
Grinnell, Iowa 50112
phone: (641) 269-4408; fax: (641) 26-4508
cutchins[at]grinnell[dot]edu

Obermiller Scholarship

This award, donated by a Grinnell alum to honor Ray Obermiller, is given to one, two, or three first-year students with financial need who, in the opinion of the selection committee, have demonstrated excellence and integrity in academic work and extra-curricular activities at Grinnell. The award, typically $1500 to $2000 per recipient, is to be used in the second year and is awarded for one year only. In 2013-14, there is $5,400 to be awarded to members of the class of 2017, and will be applied to the 2014-15 academic year.

Selection Criteria

The committee bases its selection on the following criteria:

  • Academic ability
  • Financial need
  • Promise of future contributions to campus community.

All other factors being equal, there is a slight advantage given to students who have participated in intercollegiate athletics.

Application deadline & elements

In mid-February, a select group of first-year students will be invited to submit application forms. Students are invited to apply based on GPA and financial need. Applications will consist of the following elements:

  • A completed Obermiller Student Information Form On this form, please be sure to note the amount of time (per week or per semester) that you spent on each activity. Please note that the committee does not expect any applicant to have an answer for all sections; all of these sections are listed so that the committee has the best sense as to how you have elected to spend your time at Grinnell so far.  Please answer these questions on this form; do not reproduce it, or submit your answers on a separate piece of paper.
  • A unofficial copy of your transcript, obtained from the Registrar's office.  Please do not just print off a copy of your academic record from PWeb.
  • A completed Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver

Please follow the Office of Social Commitment's scholarship application submission guidelines.  Especially note that applications should not be stapled, and should only be printed on one side of the page. These materials will be due on Monday, March 10, 2014 by 5:00 pm and should be returned to the Office of Social Commitment, 1127 Park St.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Questions?

Doug Cutchins
Director of Social Commitment
1127 Park St.
cutchins[at]grinnell[dot]edu
x4408

Ray Obermiller, 1928-2013

Ray Obermiller, 1928-2013Though Ray Obermiller officially hung up his coaching whistle 18 years ago, his lifelong gift for using athletics to inspire others is evident on the walls of Mayflower Retirement Community in Grinnell, Iowa, where he resided in his later years.
A poster-sized photo hangs outside the Mayflower’s workout room that shows “Obe” (as he was widely known) leading a class of fellow seniors in strength exercises. For many years, the caption underneath this photo read: “Hey Coach, are we having ‘fun’ yet?”
After Ray’s death on July 13, 2013, at the age of 84, his friend and fellow Mayflower resident Warren Reinecke changed the caption. Now it simply states: “Ray Obermiller 1928-2013 — Coach, Counselor, and Caregiver.”
Obe’s three-decade career as Grinnell College’s swimming coach produced 20 conference championships, 18 All-American swimmers and two NCAA Division III national diving champions. Promoting exercise at the Mayflower was one of many endeavors Ray pursued after retiring from Grinnell in 1995 as Professor Emeritus of Physical Education. He also continued for many years as an assistant coach for the men and women divers and remained active in Grinnell’s town and campus communities.
Obe — who also coached men’s and women’s cross country and men’s track at Grinnell — was inducted into the inaugural class of the college’s Athletic Hall of Fame in 1995. He reached even more students as Grinnell’s first director of academic advising, a position he held for 25 years.
George Drake, Grinnell College President and Professor Emeritus, said: “People are well aware of Ray’s iconic status as the most successful coach in the history of Grinnell College’s exceptional swimming and diving program. However, because it is not in the public eye, but no less important, his outstanding contribution in creating and building his position as Grinnell’s first academic advising director is less well known. Literally thousands of Grinnell’s students have derived huge benefits from what Ray first created and then carried out with wisdom and sensitivity.”
The role of caregiver became primary in Ray’s life in 2003 when his beloved wife, Rachel Ann (Staley) was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, prompting the couple’s move to an independent living unit at Mayflower community where he attended to her needs with help from devoted caregivers who became like family.
Everyone who knew them was inspired by Ray and Rachel’s love and devotion to one another. Former swimmer J.J. (“Jim”) Williams dedicated his 2007 book Obe: The Early Years to the couple: “They are a wonderful example of love and commitment.” Rachel passed away on June 24, 2012.
Though Ray would say his life really started when he met Rachel (whom he wed on June 10, 1950), he did experience some notable events prior to their six-decade marriage. Born on Aug. 5, 1928, to Henry and Alma (Gladhill) of Clinton, Iowa, he was their tenth and final child. Two of his six brothers died in infancy. The other four — Carl, Delbert, Edward and Robert — preceded Ray in death, as did his sisters, Elsie and Jane. His sister, Annabelle, survives, as do Ray and Rachel’s children — Gretchen (Given), Max, Beth and Tim — three grandsons and two granddaughters.
Although Ray’s large family struggled to survive the Depression on his father’s factory wages, he enjoyed many adventures growing up along the Mississippi River. And it was at a Clinton pool where he did his first dive — a belly flop off the high board — at age 7. Ray’s success as a swimmer and diver in high school won him a full scholarship at Iowa State University, where he competed all four years and captured second in diving as a senior in the Big Seven Conference championship.
During Ray’s college years, he met Rachel in her hometown of Denison, where she worked as cashier at a pool he managed during summers. After their marriage, Rachel taught school in Ames while Ray finished his college education. A year later, Ray was forced into a painful separation from his Rachel, who was pregnant with their first child, when he was drafted into the Army. Stationed in Germany, he swam and dove for an Army team that defeated the German national team. At the European Army championship, he not only coached the team but won both the 1-meter and 3-meter diving. He later coached and competed for the Army team in Cairo, where he was also invited to meet Egyptian President Nasser.
Reunited with Rachel and Gretchen (and soon joined by their first son, Max), Ray began an 11-year stint as a coach and counselor at Central High School in Sioux City, Iowa, in 1955. Squads under his leadership won 13 state championships in cross country and mile-team races. In swimming, Obe’s teams compiled an 86-13 dual meet record and produced six All-American swimmers. During this time, he also earned a master’s degree from the University of South Dakota. In 1995, Ray was inducted into the Athletics Hall of Fame at the annual Sioux City Relays.
In 1966 Ray learned of the job opening at Grinnell College — and about the college’s tuition exchange program offered to children of staff. He made the difficult decision to apply, knowing how hard it would be to send his kids through college on his $8,000 high school salary. Early on, the going was tough: Only one cross county runner and five swimmers showed up for his first practices. Establishing a swimming program in the college’s dilapidated, three-lane pool was also a challenge. (Grinnell is now home to one of the finest small-college swimming facilities in the country.)
As documented by J. J. Williams in his book, Obe quickly turned both programs around, winning the conference swimming title just four years after arriving at Grinnell. He “talked to anyone with the slightest running or swimming talent,” Williams wrote. “He even stopped one student running across campus to get to class, and asked him to join the cross country team.”
Williams noted the qualities that made Ray a great match for Grinnell-style athletics. “One of Obe’s basic rules was: ‘Nobody will be cut from the team.’ He felt that each student-athlete deserved the experience. … This high value placed on participation is still the beauty and strength of all Grinnell athletics. All-American swimmers work out next to beginning competitors. It is often hard to determine who derives more value from this attitude — the stars or the beginners.”
In fact, many beginners became stars under Obe’s patient tutelage. Although a fierce competitor, he always placed competition within the context of sportsmanship and sublimation of ego in pursuit of common team goals. He also respected the challenge his athletes faced as students navigating Grinnell’s rigorous curriculum. In Williams’ book, many former athletes recalled Obe ordering them to skip a practice to order to fully prepare for an important exam.
Grinnell College alumnus and swimmer Jim Carns noted Obe’s “concern for the students, his insistence that academics take priority over sports, and his readiness to help” all added up to make him “a great human being as well as an outstanding coach. … Ray set a tone for sports that I wish was set by every coach. He pushed you to excel, but not to be obsessive. He built championship teams without sacrificing warmth and courtesy.” Obe was also known for his ability diffuse athletes’ tensions with a witty quip that put things in perspective.
After his death, dozens of former students and athletes — young and old — sent condolences to Ray’s family. Many spoke of what an honor and privilege it was to have been coached by Obe. But from Ray’s perspective, the honor was his.
“I want to thank all of the athletes I’ve coached over the years,” Obe wrote in an epilogue to Williams’ book. “I could not imagine that I would be so happy with my career choice. After over 55 years of coaching, I still get so much enjoyment from working with young people. I have never regretted a single day I spent in teaching and coaching: It was wonderful to do something I loved doing and still get paid for it.”
In tribute to his lifelong dedication to students and learning, the Professor Raymond Obermiller Scholarship was established in 1986. In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts may be made in Ray’s honor to this scholarship. Gifts may also be made to the Mayflower Exercise Program or the Mayflower Human Needs Fund, 616 Broad Street, Grinnell, Iowa 50112.
A memorial service will be held 10:30 a.m., Friday, August 16, 2013, in the Carman Center of the Mayflower Community, 600 Park Street, in Grinnell. A memorial service will also be held 10:30 a.m., Saturday, August 17, 2013, at Herrick Chapel on the Grinnell College campus.
A private family interment will be held at Hazelwood Cemetery in Grinnell.
Ray Obermiller swimming
 

President's Medal

The President's Medal is awarded annually during Commencement to the senior who exemplifies the ideal Grinnell student. To be considered for the award, a student must:

  • Reach and maintain superior scholarship while a Grinnell student
  • Demonstrate leadership in activities that credit the student and add to the College's stature
  • Display the moral and human attributes of a compassionate and sensitive human being
  • Conduct matters with poise and maturity
  • Be fair and willing to accept responsibility
  • Think before acting and understand before judging

The President's Medal was redesigned in 1993 by Sheena Brown Thomas '71, a designer/goldsmith with Elements Ltd. in Des Moines, Iowa. The previous medal was designed by the late Louis Glenn Zirkle, professor of art.

Thomas also designed the first Archibald Prize Medal (given for highest GPA in the senior class, and also awarded during Commencement), which is compatible in design with the President's Medal. Both medals are adaptations of the President's Medallion, which is work by the president of the college as an emblem of office at all Grinnell academic ceremonials and when the president officially represents the College at academic occasions elsewhere.

Cast and fabricated from silver, both medals are formed in a soft triangular shape and include the Grinnell College seal.

The seal uses a modified oval design enclosing four laurel leaves and the founding date: 1846. Raised letters surrounding the laurel leaves proclaim, "Collegium Iowense Grinnelli" and "Veritas et Humanitas" -- Latin for "Truth and Humility." The honoree's name is engraved on the back.

The President's Medalist is determined annually by the college president, based on the recommendation of a committee comprised of faculty and staff.

Past President's Medalists

  • 2013 Noah Most
  • 2012 Eric Ritter
  • 2011 Ragnar Thorisson
  • 2010 Hart D. Ford
  • 2009 Brian Perbix
  • 2008 Olajumoke "Jumy" Adekeye
  • 2007 Megan K. Straughan
  • 2006 Eli Zigas
  • 2005 Anik Gevers
  • 2004 Randy Martinson
  • 2003 Lise-Marie Monroe
  • 2002 Kendra Young
  • 2001 Nicole Nelson
  • 2000 Ilana Golin
  • 1999 Brandie J. Christie
  • 1998 Erin Childress
  • 1997 Alice Gates
  • 1996 Jeffrey Lake
  • 1995 Scott Newstrom
  • 1994 Guen Gifford
  • 1993 Katrina Knight
  • 1992 Annamma M. Alexander
  • 1991 Marjorie Hrbek
  • 1990 Jon G. "Jake" Kosek
  • 1989 Katherine E. Furnish
  • 1988 Elisabeth Shelley Reid
  • 1987 Meghan E. Hays
  • 1986 Robert R. Rollins
  • 1985 Ian A. McLean
  • 1984 Sandra L. Laursen
  • 1983 Jennifer M. Jones
  • 1982 Eric E. Johnson
  • 1981 Lori A. Llewelyn
  • 1980 Nathaniel S. Borenstein
  • 1979 Brent C. Williams
  • 1978 Susan E. Duffey
  • 1977 Robert D. Sheeler
  • 1976 John A. Haigh
  • 1975 Frances Cutler
  • 1974 Deborah M. Van Horn
  • 1973 Carolyn Ashbaugh
  • 1972 Gregory L. Vranicar
  • 1971 Richard A. Deyo
  • 1970 Carol L. Martinson
  • 1969 Grant F. Crandall
  • 1968 Ronald M. Cogswell
  • 1967 Anne Sprague
Rhodes Scholarship

(Text copied from the Rhodes Scholarship website)

The Rhodes Scholarships, the oldest international educational fellowships, were initiated after the death of Cecil Rhodes in 1902, and bring outstanding students from many countries around the world to the University of Oxford. The first American Scholars entered Oxford in 1904. American Rhodes Scholars are selected through a decentralized process by which regional selection committees choose 32 Scholars each year representing the fifty states.  Applicants from more than 300 American colleges and universities have been selected as Rhodes Scholars. In most years, even after a century of competition, a Rhodes Scholar is selected from an institution which has not formerly supplied a successful applicant. Extraordinary intellectual distinction is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for election to a Rhodes Scholarship. Selection committees are charged to seek excellence in qualities of mind and in qualities of person which, in combination, offer the promise of effective service to the world in the decades ahead. The Rhodes Scholarships, in short, are investments in individuals rather than in project proposals. Accordingly, applications are sought from talented students without restriction as to their field of academic specialization or career plans although the proposed course of study must be available at Oxford, and the applicant’s undergraduate program must provide a sufficient basis for study in the proposed field. Through the years, Rhodes Scholars have pursued studies in all of the varied fields available at the University of Oxford. Election to the Scholarship is normally for two or three years, depending upon the degree program pursued by the Scholar. A Scholarship, including required University and college fees and a stipend for living expenses, may be renewed, at the complete discretion of the Rhodes Trustees, for a third year for those pursuing a doctoral degree and whose progress is deemed satisfactory. For those for whom the University requires fees in a fourth year for the completion of a doctorate, and when no other external funding is offered, again at the discretion of the Trustees, those fees will be paid, although not an additional stipend. (College and University jobs are often available to those remaining in Oxford in such fourth years.) The Trustees will not pay fourth-year fees in either the Division of the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences or the Division of Medical Sciences as Scholars may enter directly to work for a doctorate in these divisions in three years. Scholars applying for a master’s degree in one of these two science divisions should not, therefore, expect to be able to use the scholarship to go on to a doctorate.  Rhodes Scholars may not apply for the MBA or the Master in Financial Economics (MFE) in their first year, but may pursue either of these one-year degrees in their second year, following the completion of a different one-year master’s degree. All educational costs, such as matriculation, tuition, laboratory and certain other fees, are paid on the Scholar’s behalf by the Rhodes Trustees. Each Scholar receives in addition a maintenance allowance adequate to meet necessary expenses for term-time and vacations. The Rhodes Trustees cover the necessary costs of travel to and from Oxford. Mr. Rhodes' Will contains four criteria by which prospective Rhodes Scholars are to be selected:

  • literary and scholastic attainments;
  • energy to use one's talents to the full, as exemplified by fondness for and success in sports;
  • truth, courage, devotion to duty, sympathy for and protection of the weak, kindliness, unselfishness and fellowship;
  • moral force of character and instincts to lead, and to take an interest in one's fellow beings.

Underlying these standards is the aim that Scholars be physically, intellectually, morally capable of leadership, that is, persons who, in Mr. Rhodes' phrase, will "esteem performance of public duties as [their] highest aim." From this statement one may infer he expected his Scholars to play an influential part in the betterment of society, wherever their careers might lead them. Much of the distinctiveness of the Rhodes Scholarships stems from this comprehensive set of criteria. Intellectual excellence is obviously required, but not in isolation of other qualities. Mr. Rhodes sought Scholars who were more than "mere bookworms;" wanted their intellectual talents to be combined with concern for others. Thus the Selection Committees assign the highest importance to this blend of character with intellect. (End of excerpted text. Much more information is available on the Rhodes Scholarship website, and should be carefully and thoroughly reviewed by potential candidates)

Grinnell College's nomination process

Please direct all questions about Grinnell's nomination process to Doug Cutchins, director of social commitment, x4408. The following materials must be submitted to the Office of Social Commitment, 1127 Park St., by 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, September 3, 2013. Please print only on one side of the paper.

  • A printed version of the completed Rhodes Scholarship application form, which can be completed online.
  • A personal statement, adhering to these guidelines from the Rhodes Trust: "A signed short personal statement describing the applicant's academic and other interests. This statement should describe the specific area of proposed study and the applicant's reasons for wishing to study at Oxford, and it must conclude with the following signed statement: 'I certify that this essay is my own work.' This personal essay must not exceed 1,000 words in length (approximately four double-spaced pages) and should be written in as simple and direct a manner as possible. It should be set in a typeface no smaller than 10 points. Selection Committees will place special emphasis on this personal essay, and it will be forwarded to Oxford colleges to which Rhodes Scholars-elect apply for admission." (Advice on writing personal statements)  (Advice from Joe Schall on writing personal statements.)
  • "A succinct pertinent list of principal activities and honors in college (including prizes, scholarships, offices held; athletic record; extracurricular interests and substantial activities) with dates. This must not exceed two pages in length, and should be set in a typeface no smaller than 10 points."
  • An unofficial copy of your Grinnell College transcript, which may be obtained from the Registrar's Office. Please do not print off a grade report from PioneerWeb and hand this in instead of a transcript.
  • A signed copy of the Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver

Please ensure that all documents submitted for the on-campus nomination process comply with these guidelines. In addition, you must also:

  • Arrange to have three letters of recommendation submitted by the September 3 deadline. These should be submitted directly to the Office of Social Commitment. Please note that you do not need to have the full 5-8 letters of recommendation required for the national selection process submitted for the on-campus process; only three letters are required at this time. However, applicants must indicate on their application form who else would write letters of recommendation if they are nominated.

Please note that the on-campus nomination process does not require a photograph of the applicant, as required by the national election process.

Institutional Endorsement

Candidates for Grinnell's endorsement in the Rhodes Scholarship competition should list President Raynard Kington as the author of their letter of endorsement in their online application.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Grinnell College Rhodes Scholars, 1904-present

Kendra (Young) Harris '02

David White '90

Susan Duffey Campbell '78

Thomas W. Merril '71

Grant E. Crandell '69

Duane Krohnke '61

John R. Price '60

George A. Drake '56

Neil L. Crone '25

Maxwell H. Herriot '19

James H. St. John 1914

Paul G. Williams 1913

William A. Ziegler 1910

Joseph G. Walleser 1903

Lori Ann Schwab '95 Alumni Grant

Lori Ann Schwab '95 was committed to making the world a better place by helping others, but her life was cut short by a sudden illness while she was studying in London in 1994. The Lori Ann Schwab '95 Alumni Grant recognizes the ongoing community service of Grinnellians who were at the College with Lori. The grant provides stipends to support specific projects or fulfill the needs of nonprofit service organizations or public schools in which these individuals are significantly involved.

Eligibility

Grinnell College alumni (defined by the College as anyone who was enrolled at least one full semester) from the classes of 1992 through 1998 are eligible to apply for the grant.

Grant and Criteria

The number of grants awarded varies from year to year based on the financial performance of the fund and the number of applications deemed deserving. Each grant awarded is for a minimum of $250 and a maximum of $1,500. In 2013-14, the committee will allocate a maximum of $3,560 in support of Schwab Award projects. Applications for grants must demonstrate a tangible benefit to others. Stipends may be used to support original projects, to supplement existing projects or programs, or to fund professional development. Preference will be given to proposals that benefit children. The following examples of possible unfunded or underfunded needs (listed in random order) are meant to stimulate thought but not to limit ideas:

  • Books, art supplies, or science equipment
  • Health or safety outreach programs
  • Senior/school or "buddy" partnerships
  • Field trips to museums or environmental centers
  • Activities in homeless shelters
  • Attendance at conferences or workshops on learning disorders

The alumnus must be significantly involved as a staff member or a volunteer at the organization or public school that benefits from the grant.  Organizations (with the exception of public schools) must be 501(c)(3)nonprofits as defined by the IRS.

Please note: Schwab Grant funds are sent directly to the alumni who receives the award, and may be treated as taxable income. Schwab Grant recipients may themselves donate the award to a non-profit agency, and in doing so may reduce their tax liability. If requested, Grinnell can pay the award in two halves in 2014 and 2015. All applicants for the Schwab Grant should consult with a tax professional to determine how receiving this award would impact their individual tax picture. Schwab Grant recipients may hold part of the award in reserve to offset any additional tax payments, but the plan to do so should be noted in their Schwab Grant budget. If the alumni who receives the award has non-resident tax status in the US, Grinnell College is required to withhold 30% federal tax unless the award is exempt under IRS tax code or a tax treaty.

Application Process

The deadline for applications is the third Wednesday in February. Members of the selection committee include faculty, staff, and alumni, who will consult with members of Lori Ann Schwab's family.  Recipients are announced at Reunion and recognized in College publications. To apply for the Lori Ann Schwab '95 Alumni Grant, please submit the following to the Center for Careers, Life, and Service, 1127 Park St., Grinnell, IA 50112 by the third Wednesday in February.

  • A completed, signed Schwab Alumni Grant Application
  • A 2-3 page brief essay which answers the following questions: a) Describe your project. Why is it important? What are its goals? b) Why is this project especially important to you? c) What is your work plan (if applicable)?
  • A proposed project budget
  • Letter of support from your sponsoring organization/public school
  • Confirmation of 501(c)(3) status (if applicable)

 

Please make sure that all application materials comply with these submission guidelines.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Remembering Lori (excerpts of letters from her friends)

{C}Lori Ann SchwabIt is all too infrequently that we meet someone with Lori's smile, with her energy, and her enthusiasm for life and experience. She touched many people and taught them by example how to laugh, how to appreciate the art around them, and how to put their principles into action.

I have many memories of Lori being so happy because of the smallest things. She used to love telling silly jokes, and when she was telling them she had a grin that was so bright and happy you couldn't help but laugh. 

Lori was in constant communication with her friends, and it appears that everyone with whom she came into contact became a friend. This is a gift that few possess and even fewer use well.

Behind her giggles was a strength of conviction and a desire to conquer her fears, which she imparted to everyone who knew her.

I always appreciated our short conversations because I knew that when she asked how I was doing, she genuinely wanted to know. I remember when I broke my ankle.  At breakfast the next morning, Lori was there to bus my tray and help me to class. She carried my books as I hobbled along, knowing she'd be late if she walked with me.

Horace said, 'CARPE DIEM' - seize the day. Lori sure did that.

Lori had such a sweet soul. To talk merely of her smile and her warmth is only to scratch the surface.  I never felt I had to hide my true feelings from her, or be anything I wasn't, as she would never judge me. What shines forth is her passion for social justice and her compassion for those who have been unjustly deprived. In these stirrings of her heart, Lori was a person of rare and valuable commitment.

[Discussing a camper with Down's syndrome] During her one week with this camper, your daughter showed deep devotion to the idea of beating the odds. Never before have I seen such determination or courage. Lori was and always will be a tribute to camp counseling. She lived her life as a blessing,and I promise that as much as I am able, I will make her memory a blessing as well.

Lori found pleasure and comfort in ordinary places and things that most of us took for granted.

For more information

Doug Cutchins '93
Assistant Dean and Director of Post-Graduate Transitions
1127 Park St.
Grinnell, IA 50112
(641) 269-4408
cutchins[at]grinnell[dot]edu

Lori Ann Schwab '95 Prize for Community Service

The Lori Ann Schwab '95 Prize for Community Service is a $1500 award given annually by Grinnell College to one senior to recognize that student's service to the campus and local community during their time here. While there are no restrictions on the use of the award, the recipient will be strongly encouraged to donate at least $500 to an organization that he or she volunteered with in Grinnell. The recipient is announced during the commencement weekend Baccalaureate program, and the recipient's name is added to a plaque on permanent display in the Office of Service Learning and Engagement.

The Lori Ann Schwab Memorial Fund recognizes the spirit and memory of Lori Ann Schwab '95 and her commitment to making the world a better place by helping others. Lori died from a tragic illness during a study-abroad program in London. Lori, whose home was in Berkeley, California, was an art major and especially active at the pre-school and in women's advocacy.

Eligibility

All graduating fourth-year students are eligible for the Lori Ann Schwab '95 Prize for Community Service. Fourth-year students and other members of the college community will be invited to nominate individuals in late January, 2014. Self-nominations are allowed. To nominate a current fourth-year student for this prize, email Doug Cutchins. Nominations must be submitted no later than 5:00 pm on February 3, 2014.

Selection process

Nominees will be notified by email of their nomination on or about February 4, 2014. Students who are not nominated will not be allowed to apply. Completed applications from nominees are due on Monday, February 17, 2014. A completed application will consist of the following elements:

  • A completed Schwab Senior Prize for Community Service Application Form
  • A list of volunteer acitivies, leadership positions, or other relevant experiences either at Grinnell or elsewhere during the last four years. Please provide details on the extent and length of these experiences.
  • A short statement of 1-3 pages reflecting on your community service experiences over the last four years. This statement can describe what you've accomplished, what your service has meant to you, the lessons that you've taken from your service, and/or how this service has impacted your goals and future plans.
  • A Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver. Because this form requires a signature, if you are off-campus you may fax or mail this form separately from your other application materials.

Please ensure that all application materials conform with these submission guidelines. Applications may be turned in to the Office of Social Commitment, 1127 Park St., by email to Doug Cutchins, or faxed to (641) 269-4508.

The Lori Ann Schwab '95 Prize for Community Service committee will meet before spring break to review applications and decide on a recipient. The committee is comprised of members of the college community who have ties to community service work, the community of Grinnell, or who knew and worked with Lori Ann Schwab '95. The recipient of the Lori Ann Schwab '95 Prize for Community Service will be notified soon after the committee meets.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Contact person

Doug Cutchins
Director of Social Commitment
1127 Park Street
x4408
cutchins[at]grinnell[dot]edu

Elsie Stouffer '24 Scholarship

The Elsie Stouffer '24 Scholarship provides funding for graduate study leading to a career in public service in Latin America. For the purposes of this scholarship, "public service" is interpreted broadly, and includes work in the non-profit, government, education, health, and other sectors. This year, there is approximately $17,700 to be awarded for graduate study; this graduate study does not need to be undertaken immediately following graduation.

Conditions of Eligibility

In order to apply for the Elsie Stouffer '24 Scholarship, you must meet the following conditions of eligibility:

  • A member of the current fourth-year class.
  • A woman.
  • Fluent in French or Spanish.
  • Commited to a career in public service in Latin America.

Application Process

Applicants must submit the following elements to the Center for Careers, Life, and Service, 1127 Park St. by Monday, February 10, 2014

  • An unofficial transcript, obtained from the Registrar's Office
  • A one-page resume
  • A three-page essay describing their interest in Latin America, their preparation for their chosen career, graduate study plans, and career goals.
  • A Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver

Please ensure that all application materials conform with these submission guidelines. In addition, applicants must arrange to have two letters of recommendation submitted on their behalf, at least one of which must be from a Grinnell College faculty member. Letters should address the applicant's academic ability and potential contributions to public service in Latin America. There is no application form.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Contact Person

Doug Cutchins 
Assistant Dean and Director of Post-Graduate Transitions 
cutchins[at]grinnell[dot]edu, x4408 
1127 Park St.

Truman Scholarship

The Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation - the federal memorial to our thirty-third President - awards merit-based scholarships to college students who plan to pursue careers in government or elsewhere in public service. Truman Scholars receive up to $30,000 for graduate or professional school, participate in leadership development activities, and have special opportunities for internships and employment with the federal government. Truman Scholars take part in the Truman Scholars Leadership Week, which gives scholars the chance to meet other like-minded students from across the nation; learn more about graduate school and scholarship opportunities; interact with past scholars and career public servants; and undertake a community service project. Some Truman Scholars are also able to take part in the Summer Institute after graduation, which includes a nine-week internship in Washington, DC; seminars in public policy; workshops; and social activities with other Truman Scholars. 24 of the Scholars will also be selected to work in DC for one year after graduation as a part of the Truman-Albright Fellows Program, which includes a year-long public service position, and graduate-level seminars in public policy. Truman Scholars also bypass the written section of the Foreign Service Officer examination and move directly to the oral exam.

The Foundation defines public service as employment in government at any level, uniformed services, public-interest organizations, nongovernmental research and/or educational organizations, public and private schools, and public service-oriented nonprofit organizations such as those whose primary purposes are to help needy or disadvantaged persons or to protect the environment. The Foundation seeks persons who aspire for positions in government or the nonprofit and advocacy sectors where they wish to improve the ways in which federal, state, or local government agencies, educational institutions, and nonprofit organizations serve the public and protect resources. The Foundation has supported Truman Scholars in many fields of study, including agriculture, biology, engineering, environmental management, physical and social sciences, and technology policy, as well as traditional fields such as economics, education, government, history, international relations, law, political science, public administration, nonprofit management, public policy, and public health. Past Truman Scholarship winners serve as managers of government programs, legislators and aides for legislative bodies, foreign service officers, school teachers, staff members in policy analysis and research organizations, attorneys for government agencies, public defenders, professors, and professional staff in advocacy organizations and not-for-profit institutions to serve the disadvantaged or to protect the environment.

In 2014, one scholarship will be available to a qualified resident nominee in each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and, considered as a single entity, the Islands: Guam, Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. (Residency is generally determined by home address for school registration, family's primary residence, and voter registration.) The Foundation will select up to 15 at-large Scholars. The award may be used only for tuition, fees, books, room and board, or other specifically approved expenses. Payments from the Foundation may be received to supplement, but not to duplicate, benefits from the educational institution or from other foundations, institutions, or organizations. The combined benefits from all sources may not exceed the costs of tuition, fees, books, and room and board as prescribed by the institution. Scholars may defer, for up to four years, Foundation support for their graduate studies after completion of their undergraduate studies. Scholars in graduate study programs supported by other means and Scholars in the Armed Forces may request additional years of deferral. Scholars are required to work in public service for three of the seven years following completion of a Foundation funded graduate degree program as a condition of receiving funding. Scholars who are not employed in public service for a total of three years, or who fail to provide proof to the Foundation of such employment, will be required to repay any funds received along with interest. The Foundation will have an appeals process for those Scholars in special circumstances.

Eligibility

To be eligible for Grinnell College's nomination for a Truman Scholarship, you must meet the following minimum eligibilty standards:

  • A college junior (click here for the Truman foundation's definition of this term). Please note that Grinnell nominates students during the spring of their second year.
  • A strong student academically. The Truman requires that students be in the top quarter of their graduating class. Because Grinnell does not rank students by GPA, in general this means that we nominate students with a GPA of 3.3 and above.
  • Have a commitment to a career in public service, as defined above.
  • A United States citizen or a United States national from American Samoa or the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Resident aliens (green card holders) are not eligible.

Common Characteristics of Successful Truman Applicants

  • Accomplished, proven, and effective leaders
  • People who have taken or shown initiative - starting or exploding organizations or ideas
  • Vision/creativity
  • Interest in policy or solutions at a systemic level
  • Interest in politics or political means to an end
  • Intelligent, articulate, and well-versed in a variety of topics
  • Energetic

Nomination Process

PLEASE NOTE that the nomination process for the class of 2016 has been postponed to the 2014-15 academic year.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

National Application Preparation

Because the Truman Scholarship's national application is quite extensive and in-depth, Grinnell's four nominees from the class of 2016 will meet weekly as a group with Doug Cutchins throughout the summer or fall semester of 2014 to work on completing it. This is a major commitment, and past nominees have compared the experience to being the equivalent of a 2-credit course. Nominees will be expected to write short answers on a near-weekly basis; read and comment on one another's work; and conduct research on their topic of interest, for their policy proposal, and about possible graduate education courses. Nominees should expect to spend two to five hours per week preparing their application throughout the summer or fall semester (as determined by the group). It is not required that nominees be on campus for the fall 2014 semester. Nominees who are abroad during this time will be integrated into the group as possible and using available technology. When a majority of the nominees are off-campus during the fall semester, the group has sometimes met by conference call during the summer months instead.

Value of the Application Process

While the Truman Scholarship application process is quite intensive and time-consuming, nominees will be constantly encouraged to focus on the benefits of the process of applying. This is an opportunity to think seriously about who you are, what you have accomplished, your goals in life, and what is important to you. Nominees also have the chance to think seriously about graduate school, to conduct in-depth research on a topic of particular interest to them, and to hone and practice their interviewing skills. Regardless of whether the nominee is named as a finalist or wins the Truman Scholarship, our aim is for the process to justify the amount of work that goes into producing a high-quality application. Applicants also benefit by having the opportunity to work closely with and get to know three peers who are similarly interested in and dedicated to a career in public service.

Recent Grinnell College Truman Nominees, Finalists, and Scholars

2013-14 (currently in progress)

  • Opeyemi Awe (finalist)
  • Lilianna Bagnoli
  • Anna Banker (finalist)
  • Keaton Cameron-Burr

2012-13

  • Cynthia Amezcua
  • Brian Buckley (finalist)
  • Leah Lucas (finalist)
  • Jeremy Sanchez

2011-12

  • Anika Manzoor (finalist)
  • Amanda Muskat (finalist)
  • Charity Porotesano (scholar)
  • Jenny Peek (finalist)

2010-11

  • Claire Griffith
  • Joe Maloney
  • Annie Tomlinson (finalist)
  • Thomas Van Heeke

2009-10

  • Aaron Barker
  • Claire Branigan
  • Allison Brinkhorst
  • Rebecca Heller

2008-09

  • Winnon Brunson, Jr. (finalist)
  • Hart Ford-Hodges
  • Caitlin Galer-Unti
  • Jacob Reisberg (finalist)

2007-08

  • Tommy Jamison
  • Dan LaFountaine
  • Alec Schierenbeck (scholar)
  • Emily Stiever (finalist)

2006-07

  • Linn Davis (finalist)
  • Hannah Garden-Monheit (finalist)
  • Christina Reynolds
  • Mary Pat Twomey

2005-06

  • Katie Jares (scholar)
  • Elena Rubin
  • Kristin Snavely
  • Ben Weyl (finalist)

2004-05

  • Jenny Dale (finalist)
  • Vashti Davis
  • Jason Rathod
  • Eli Zigas (scholar)

Questions?

The Truman Scholarship website has an excellent list of FAQs for applicants, which should be reviewed by all candidates. Grinnell College candidates should direct any other questions to Doug Cutchins, via the Contact Information below.

Udall Scholarship

In 2014, the foundation expects to award 80 scholarships of up to $5,000 and 50 honorable mentions on the basis of merit to sophomore and junior level college students. Scholarships are offered in any of three categories:

  • To students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to the environment
  • To Native American and Alaska Native students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to public policy
  • To Native American and Alaska Native students who have demonstrated commitment to careers related to Native health care

The Udall Foundation seeks future leaders across a wide spectrum of environmental fields, including policy, engineering, science, education, urban planning and renewal, business, health, justice, and economics. The Foundation also seeks future Native American and Alaska Native leaders in public and community health care, tribal government, and public policy affecting Native American communities, including land and resource management, economic development, and education. For more information, go to www.udall.gov.

Eligibility

In order to apply for the Udall Scholarship, students must meet the following eligibility criteria:

  • Be a matriculated sophomore or junior-level student at a two-year or four-year institution of higher education, pursuing a bachelor's or associate's degree during the 2013-2014 academic year. "Sophomore" is defined as a student who intends at least two more years of full-time undergraduate study beginning in fall 2014. "Junior" is defined as a student who intends at least one more year of full-time undergraduate study beginning in fall 2014. (Students may apply for funding in both their sophomore and junior years; 3rd time applicants, however, will not be eligible.)
  • Be committed to a career related to the environment, OR committed to a career in tribal public policy OR Native American health care (only Native Americans and Alaska Natives are eligible to apply in tribal public policy or Native American health care). Native American students studying tribal public policy or native health do not need to demonstrate commitment to the environment. Likewise, students pursuing environmentally related careers do not need to be Native American, nor do they need todemonstrate commitment to tribal public policy or Native health.
  • Have a college grade-point average of at least a "B" or the equivalent.
  • Be pursuing full-time study during the 2014-2015 academic year.
  • Be a U.S. citizen, U.S. national, or U.S. permanent resident.

Grinnell College's Nomination Process

Second- and third-year students who are interested in applying for one of Grinnell's six nominations for the Udall Scholarship must file a preliminary   application to the Office of Social Commitment, 1127 Park St. by 5:00 pm on Tuesday, January 21, 2014. A preliminary application will consist of the following elements:

  1. A cover sheet that includes the applicant's name, email, mailing address (campus and home), phone number, class year, major, advisor, and country of citizenship.
  2. A one-page resume which details, among other qualifications, the applicant's commitment to topics related to the environment.
  3. An unofficial copy of the applicant's transcript.
  4. A two-page essay in which the applicant describes in more detail one or more of the following: a. why they are interested in a career related to the environment b. a leadership activity they have undertaken c. an experience which led them to be committed to the environment d. public service activities related to the environment e. future career plans
  5. A completed Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver

Students may, if they choose, submit a completed Udall Scholarship application instead of the documents listed above (however, all applicants must submit the permission form/waiver and an unofficial transcript). This requires more work, but does give student a jump-start on completing the national application. Please ensure that all documents submitted for Grinnell's on-campus nomination process comply with these guidelines.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

Joseph F. Wall '41 Sesquicentennial Service Awards

The Joseph F. Wall '41 Sesquicentennial Service Awards, established during Grinnell College's Sesquicentennial celebration in 1996, have created a legacy to the College's tradition of 150 years of social responsibility and public service. The awards are named in honor of the late professor of history who always inspired an ideal of social responsibility in his students.

The college typically gives awards of $25,000 to each of two graduates to carry out a service project that is of tangible benefit to others. Projects may be original or supplement existing projects or programs; they may address issues specific to local communities, regions, or of wider global concern; and may be carried out domestically or internationally. The application and selection process as well as descriptions of all past award winners are available below.

The awards will provide financial support for selected graduates to engage in a period of service in projects, programs, and organizations that are dedicated to improving the lives of others. Any graduate of Grinnell College with a commitment to service for the benefit of others is eligible to apply for the awards. Project proposals should include a clear plan of implementation including a project budget. As possible, award winners return to campus after completion of their projects to share their experiences. The awards are a fitting and lasting tribute to the College's beloved Professor Joseph Wall and to the alumni's dedication to community service.

Frequency: Annually

Link to Application: Wall Award Application

Winners

Joseph F. Wall '41 Scholarship

The Joseph F. Wall '41 Scholarship was established in 1983 by the Class of 1958 in honor of Joseph F. Wall '41, a graduate of Grinnell, Professor Emeritus of History, Dean of the College, and the first director of the college's Rosenfield Public Affairs program. The scholarship is restricted to second-semester juniors who have established outstanding academic records and made a significant contribution to the college community. The amount of the award is dependent on the individual student's financial need. In a typical year, around five students are selected for this honor, with scholarship amounts ranging from $500 to several thousand dollars. In 2013-14, the committee will allocate approximately $17,400 to Wall Scholarship recipients.

Application Process

Third-year students with a GPA above a certain threshold are automatically considered to be nominees. Other members of the third-year class may be nominated by Grinnell College faculty members. Students who are not nominated may not apply. All nominees will be informed of their eligibility for the scholarship in early March. Applications are due from nominees on Monday, March 31, 2014 by 5:00 pm in the Office of Social Commitment, 1127 Park St. Nominees who are abroad may submit their application materials via email or fax (contact Doug Cutchins with any questions on how to do so). Completed applications will consist of the following:

Please ensure, as possible, that all application materials conform with these submission guidelines. Applications will be reviewed by a faculty committee. Scholars are selected on the basis of merit, but scholarship amounts are based on financial need.  All nominees will be informed of their status in late April or early May.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

For more information

Doug Cutchins Director of Social Commitment x4408 1127 Park St. Fax: (641) 269-4508 cutchins[at]grinnell[dot]edu

Watson Fellowship

(Text copied from the Watson Fellowship website)

THE THOMAS J. WATSON FOUNDATION inaugurated the Thomas J. Watson Fellowship in 1968. The mission of the Fellowship Program is to offer college graduates of unusual promise a year of independent, purposeful exploration and travel outside of the United States in order to enhance their capacity for resourcefulness, imagination, openness, and leadership and to foster their humane and effective participation in the world community.

The Program provides Fellows an opportunity for a focused and disciplined year of their own devising--period in which they can have some surcease from the lockstep of prescribed educational and career patterns in order to explore with thoroughness a particular interest. During their year abroad, Fellows have an unusual, sustained, and demanding opportunity to take stock of themselves, to test their aspirations and abilities, to view their lives and American society in greater perspective, and, concomitantly, to develop a more informed sense of international concern.

In selecting Watson Fellows, we are most concerned with holistically identifying individuals who demonstrate leadership, resourcefulness, imagination or vision, independence, integrity, responsibility and emotional maturity, and courage. A candidate's academic record, while not of primary importance, is also considered, together with those extracurricular activities that reflect both initiative and dedication.

The proposed project should reflect a candidate's genuine interest in, and long-standing commitment to, a specific pursuit, whether or not this interest is evident in a formal course of study. The project must be one that can be conducted with great independence and adaptability, and it cannot involve formal study at a foreign institution. It must involve travel to areas where the student has not previously lived or studied for a significant length of time. Fellows are not allowed to return home at any time during their Fellowship year except in rare circumstances and with the prior approval of the program. In short, the project should be personally significant, imaginative, and feasible.

Administered in cooperation with outstanding private colleges and universities throughout the United States, the Watson Fellowship provides a grant of $28,000 to each recipient. (Fellows whose spouse or dependent child will accompany them may be eligible for a grant of $35,000.) In addition, the Fellowship Program will supply, as a supplement to the stipend, an amount equal to twelve months of payments of eligible outstanding federally guaranteed and institutional student loans. The purpose of the student loan assistance program is to ease the financial burden of Watson Fellows during their Fellowship year, and to provide encouragement for all students, regardless of student loan debt, to apply for Watson Fellowships.

All Fellows are required to maintain contact with the Fellowship Program during their year abroad. In addition to quarterly progress reports, they must submit a final evaluation of their year together with an accounting of the expenditure of Fellowship funds. The Fellowship is taxable and must be reported by recipients as income. Taxes are not withheld by the Fellowship Program.

The Thomas J. Watson Fellowship Program welcomes applicants from a diverse range of backgrounds and academic disciplines. All graduating seniors at participating institutions are eligible for nomination by their institution.

Individual colleges and universities participating in the Watson Fellowship Program establish their own procedures and deadlines for the application process. A representative of the program will visit each campus to interview nominees during the fall and winter months. Forty Watson Fellows will be selected from among the approximately 155 candidates nominated by the participating institutions.  

Grinnell College and the Watson Fellowship

Grinnell College is proud to be one of the colleges and universities who have been invited to nominate four seniors for the 2013-14 Thomas J. Watson Fellowship competition. Grinnell College has been invited to participate in this Fellowship every year since the program was founded in the late 1960s, and, with only three exceptions, has had at least one Watson Fellow in each class. A complete list of Grinnell's Watson Fellows can be found at the bottom of this webpage. Doug Cutchins serves as Grinnell College's liaison to the Watson Foundation. Potential applicants are strongly encouraged to meet with him to discuss their ideas and plans for a Watson Fellowship. To make an appointment with Doug, please call (641) 269-4408 or email him.

Application process

The following materials must be submitted to the Office of Social Commitment, 1127 Park St., by 5:00 p.m. on Monday, September 16, 2013. Please submit the original plus seven copies (eight total), arranged into packets in the following order:

  • Grinnell College's 2013-14 Watson Fellowship application form.This is a .pdf file, which requires Adobe Acrobat to open. The application is formatted with form fields, which allows applicants to complete it on their computer, print it, and submit it. However, please note that unless you are working with a full version of Adobe Acrobat, you will not be able to save your edits and changes.  Note that this application requires a 100-word biographical abstract; before writing this, applicants are encouraged to review these Watson 100-word biography samples or the biographical abstracts of last year's Watson Fellows.
  • A personal statement, adhering to these guidelines from the Watson Foundation: "In your personal statement, you should discuss how your project is your project--and how it reflects your talents, concerns and commitments. It may include a description of your background, your college years, your professional goals and aspirations, and your reasons for seeking a Watson Fellowship to undertake your project. The personal statement is an opportunity to provide the Watson Fellowship Program with a sense of who you are, including how you would benefit from the unique experiences the Watson Fellowship permits and how you would embrace the challenges of immersing yourself in cultures other than your own for a year. The specific content of the personal statement is up to you, but we require that it not exceed 1500 words."  Advice on writing personal statements.
  • A project proposal, adhering to these guidelines from the Watson Foundation: "The proposal should describe your plan for the 12-month fellowship year, including a description of your proposed project and details as to how you intend to carry it out. In addition, you should include information about what it is that prepares you to undertake your project. The specific content of the proposal is up to you, but we require that it not exceed 1500 words." Please note that Watson Fellows are not allowed to travel to countries under State Department Travel Warnings; please check this list to ensure that the countries you plan to visit are not currently under travel warning. Contact Doug Cutchins if you have any questions about this policy.
  • (Optional) Other documents considered necessary for explaining the feasibility of the proposal, including such items as a budget, list of contacts, or itinerary. Applicants who proposal includes an artistic talent or skill (such as photography, dance, singing, etc.) may submit materials that demonstrate their abilities; before doing so, please contact Doug Cutchins to work out the particulars of what and how materials should be submitted.
  • An unofficial copy of your transcript, obtained from the Registrar's Office in the John Chrystal Center. Do not print out your transcript from PioneerWeb and submit this instead of the unofficial transcript.

The application form, personal statement, and project proposal should each be stapled separately, then paper-clipped together with the transcript to form a complete packet. In addition, you must also:

  • Arrange to have two recommendations submitted by the September 16 deadline, one of which must be from a Grinnell College faculty member.  These recommendations should utilize the Watson Fellowship Recommendation Form 2013-14, which is a three-page form, and should not write a separate letter.  That form is an Adobe PDF file, and the form fields should be fillable.  These should be completed, printed, and submitted directly to the Office of Social Commitment by mail, campus mail, or fax to (641) 269-4946; recommenders who have a full version of Adobe may be able to save it and email it to cutchins[at]grinnell[dot]edu. Recommenders may contact Doug Cutchins if they have any questions about submitting their recommendation.
  • Print, sign, and submit one copy (separate from your packets) of the Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver

All candidates will be interviewed 1:1 by two committee members, after which time a short list of finalists for our four nominations will be named. Those finalists will interview with one more committee member before final decisions about our four nominees. Nomination decisions should be made before fall break.  

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

2013-14 Grinnell College Nomination Committee Members

Committee members will be named in September 2013 and their names will be made publicly available in this space.

Committee members may write letters of recommendation for candidates, provided that they are a natural and strong fit for the student and their project. Committee members should not be asked to write letters of recommendation simply because they are on the committee. Letters from committee members will not be weighed more heavily than letters from non-committee members.

Grinnell College Watson Fellows, 1969-present

  • Jonathan D. Buswell, '69; Agricultural Economic Development; Honduras, El Salvador, Guatamala, Nicaragua
  • John Garang DeMabior, '69; Rural Development; East Africa
  • Gregory M. Coggs, '70; Comparative Law; Kenya, Ghana, Nigeria
  • Benson F. Smith, '70; Film; England
  • Mary E. Brooner, '71; The status of women: a Third World perspective; Ghana, Ceylon
  • Thomas J. Cole, '71; The sub-culture of povery and the impact of welfare systems; Great Britain
  • David N. Feldman, '71; The aesthetics of "lower" forms of popular culture; England, France, Denmark, Sweden
  • Douglas S. Russell, '71; New Town planning & population decentralization; Finland, West Germany, England, Sweden, Denmark
  • Edward M. Hirsch, '72; The relationship of violence to poetic form; Wales, France, England
  • Norris Stubbs, '72; A dual project: comparative Afro-Caribbean music and problems of engineering in the Caribbean; Brazil, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad, Tobago, Barbados, Honduras, Guyana
  • Robert E. Eckhardt, '73; European approaches to the problems of the aged; Spain, Sweden, Poland
  • David L. Gaines, '74; Mime; Western Europe, Poland, Japan
  • Gregg H.S. Golden, '75; First Amendment Rights: Their Parallels in Other Countries; England, France, Norway
  • Charles M. Becker, '76; State credit allocations; Yugoslavia, Tanzania, New Zealand
  • Susan B. Hyatt, '76; Multi-Ethnic Traditions in the Balkans; Yugoslavia, Greece, Bulgaria
  • Patrick Irwin, '77; American Jazz & Jazz Musicians; UK, Denmark, France, Germany, Switzerland, Austria
  • Ann K. Lion, '78; Comparative Study of Family Planning; Barbados, Jamaica
  • June Bradley, '78; New Generation of European Art Photographers; France, England, Italy, West Germany
  • Jo Looye, '79; Handicrafts and Economic Development; Chile, Ecuador
  • Keith Graves, '79; Acoustical Analysis of Baroque Music in Halls of Baroque Period; Italy, Austria, West Germany, France, England
  • Kathleen Kurz, '80; Child Nutrition; Kenya, Tanzania
  • Angelo Ioffreda, '80; Old/New World Aspects of Viticulture; Italy, France, Chile, Argentina
  • Donna Olds, '81; Jamaican Cultural History; Liberia, Jamaica
  • James Jensen, '81; Bio-Gas Digestion Systems; England, India, China
  • Laure Capouya, '82; Landscape Artists in the New World; Mexico, Brazil
  • Kathryn Jackson, '83; Nation Building in Africa; Kenya, Zimbabwe, South Africa
  • Todd L. Oberman, '83; Grass-Roots Citizen's Groups; Yugoslavia
  • Cynthia Chessick, '84; Women in Israel; Israel
  • Elizabeth Keegan, '85; Writers and Literature; China
  • Amy Fraenkel, '85; Acid Rain in Europe; Sweden, France, England
  • Meghan Hays, '87; Cuba, Yugoslavian & Nicaraguan Women. The Family & the Socialist State; Cuba, Yugoslavia, Nicaragua
  • Sarah Fee, '87; The Funerary Art of France and Madagascar; France, Madagascar
  • Peter McBride, '87; Latin American: Retracing the Nature Studies of Darwin and Wallace; Latin American countries
  • Lorelei Kelley, '88; Women's Involvement in Arms Control Disarmament; Sweden, W. Germnay, England, New Zealand
  • Timothy Manatt, '88; The Conciencia Group; Argentina
  • Emily Green, '89; Cutural & Social Perceptions of Children; Guatemala, El Salvador
  • Michelle Kuenzi, '89; Development, Modernization, & Women's Subsistence Strategies; Senegal, Mali
  • Lauri Jennisch, '90; Geriatric Health & Social Services; Sweden, England, Canada
  • Jon Kosek, '90; Resource Use and Protection; Costa Rica, Kenya, Nepal
  • Steven Pickle, '90; Political Organizations of Indigenous Peoples; Norway, Australia, New Zealand
  • Bruce Emond, '91; AIDS Counseling and Information Services; Thailand, Malaysia
  • Seth Peterson, '91; Chinese Democracy Movement-in-Exile; France, Germany, Australia, Japan, Canada
  • Louis Saletan, '91; Effects of Reforms on Soviet Performance Arts; USSR
  • Shaan Hamilton, '92; Waste Management and the Environment; England, Latvia
  • Adrienne McAdory, '92; Race vs. Ethnic vs. Class Consciousness: A Study in Africa; Ghana, Kenya, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Sierra Leone
  • Adam Stam, '93; Agrarian Reform in Russia; Russia, Ukraine
  • Rachel Stamm, '94; The Relationship Between Ecotourism and Marine Mammal Conservation; Norway, Canada, Dominican Republic, Bahamas
  • Todd Foreman, '95; Minority Groups in British Commonwealth Labour Parties; New Zealand, Australia, United Kingdom
  • Veronica Ocampo- Raeder, '95; The Dance of Humans and Nature: Finding Signatures in Tropical Rainforests; Belize, Tahiti, Kenya, Brazil
  • Aaron Gross, '96; The Practice of Ahimsa in Jainism and Tibetan Buddhism; India
  • Ryan Gibson, '98; Creating a Modern Irish Mythology by Translating Words Into Forms; The Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland
  • Margaret L. Taylor, '99; Space, Place and Identity in the European Circus; England, France, Denmark, Switzerland
  • David Burnett, '00; Technopreneurs: Making Asian Tigers Roar Again?; Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia, India
  • Megan Williams, '00; The Dustbin of History: Monuments in Eastern Europe, 1945-2000; Germany, Poland, the Baltics, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Romania, Moldova, Bulgaria, Macedonia
  • Matthew Magee, '01; Hepatitis C in Rural and Urban Populations; Italy, Egypt, India
  • Michael Abel, '02; Williamsport Bound: Youth Baseball in Asia and Latin America; Japan, Taiwan, Mexico, Venezuela, Curacao
  • Hai-Dang Phan, '03; Trans-planted and -lated Selves : Poetry in Exile; England, France, Australia
  • Devan McGranahan, '04; Sustainable Grazing and the Management of Native Mammals on African Ranches; Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania, Kenya
  • Qi Zheng, '04; Magic Bullet or Water Gun: Perception and Use of Antibiotics; Ireland, the Netherlands, Singapore, Thailand
  • Omondi Kasidhi '05; Bringing Home More Than A Medal: The Socioeconomic Impact of African Runners; South Africa, Botswana, Ethiopia, Morocco, Nigeria, and Ghana
  • Kyle Marquardt '05; The People's Fate: Language and Politics in Three Turkic States; Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan
  • Jason Rathod '06; Finding Self in the Other: Cultural Fusion in the Indian Diaspora; Fiji, Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago, Mauritius
  • Sarah Parker '07; Innovative Traditional Music: Marimba and Youth Culture in Southern Africa; Botswana, Namibia, South Africa
  • Linn Davis '08; Investigating the Investigators: Journalism in Two Developing Democracies; India and South Africa
  • Graciela Paz Arias '08; Into the Young Mind of a Cultural Revolutionary: Retracing Che's Travels; Argentina, Chile, Peru, and Venezuela
  • Filippos Rodger Tsakiris '10; No Island is an Island: An Alternative Approach to Global Sustainability; Bahamas, United Kingdom, Iceland, Sweden, Maldives, New Zealand
  • Alex Reich '11; We Are What We Eat: The Far North And Its People In a Changing World; Canada, Russia, Norway, Sweden, Finland
  • Courtney Sheehan '11; The Politics of Film Festivals; Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Netherlands, India, Russia
  • Ngoc Truong '11; Creative Discontent: Speechwriting in Open and Closed Societies; India, South Africa, Singapore, Vietnam, Australia
  • Wadzanai Motsi '12; Speaking Up: Unearthing the Motivation for Political Activism Amongst Students; Tunisia, Ghana, Czech Republic, Cambodia
  • Noah Most '13; Do-It-Yourself Biology: Innovation, Social Implications, and the Inversion of Research Paradigms; United Kingdom, Canada, India, Singapore
Tammy Zywicki '93 Memorial Scholarship

The Tammy Zywicki '93 Memorial Scholarship is given annually to a second-year student who has a 3.25 or better grade point average; an interest in art or photography as demonstrated by extra-curricular activities or courses taken at Grinnell; and a demonstrated involvement in other extra-curricular activities at Grinnell. The 2013-14 Tammy Zywicki '93 Memorial Scholarship will be approximately $5,100.

About Tammy

A profile of Tammy Zywicki, as described by her family: Tammy was a person with many qualities and interests. She was a good student, but did not think that grades were the most important aspect of a college education. She tried to achieve a balance in life of study time and relaxation time. She believed that you should work hard and play hard. She was always willing to try something new and achieve success at whatever she attempted. She liked to stay active and found many interests in her free time. She was a photographer for many years. She was always taking pictures with the hope that she would become good enough to make that her life's work. She participated in sports for exercise and also for the friendships she could make. She loved cats and shared a special language with them. Most of all Tammy valued her relationship with her parents and her 3 brothers. She felt family was very important and made special efforts to stay in touch at times when she was very busy. Tammy had a lot to offer, but her life was cut short before she could get started. The scholarship recipient should be someone who in his or her own way will continue what Tammy started.

Application process

Applicants must submit the following materials to the Office of Social Commitment, 1127 Park St., by Monday, April 7, 2014.

  • A 2-page essay in which you reflect on Tammy Zywicki's life philosophy, as stated in the profile above, particularly of the value and importance of not putting too much priority on grades, and on the value and importance of family in helping students achieve balance in their lives while attending Grinnell. At the top of this essay, include your name, campus PO Box, and username.
  • A completed Scholarship Nomination Permission Form and Waiver
  • A list and description of photography or other art activities you have been engaged with on campus, including classes in these areas.
  • A list and description of other activities you have undertaken on campus.
  • An unofficial copy of your Grinnell College transcript, obtained from the Registrar's Office.

Please note that there is no application form for this scholarship; however, all documents should conform with these submission guidelines. A faculty committee will meet to review applications in late April or early May. All applicants will be informed of their status in this competition after the committee's meeting.

Ethical Guidelines

All applicants are expected to adhere to these ethical guidelines.

For more information

Doug Cutchins Director of Social Commitment x4408 1127 Park St. cutchins[at]grinnell[dot]edu