Practitioner Preparation Education Program

Practitioner Preparation Education Program

Grinnell College has a state approved Practitioner Preparation Education Program. Through this program, students may be licensed (this is the official word Iowa uses instead of certified) to teach in Iowa, as secondary (5-12) teachers. Students wishing to teach in a state other than Iowa can use their Iowa license to apply for licensure in their state of choice. Most states will grant at least a temporary license on the strength of the Iowa license.

Licensure Overview

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult (4 credits)
  • EDU 469.06: Student Teaching Internship in Teaching ESL (12 credits)

ESL Requirements

Completion of 20 semester hours of coursework in English as a second language to include the following:

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult (4 credits)
  • EDU 346: Theory and Methods in Teaching and Learning in ESL/Bilingual Education (2 credits)
  • EDU 341-345: Research and Methods in Teaching in the Discipline (2 credits)
  • LIN 111: Introduction to Linguistics (4 credits)
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
    • ANT 260: Language and Culture 
    • PSY 355: Psychology of Language
  • EDU 213: Critical Issues in Second Language Acquisition (4 credits)
Applying to the Teacher Education Program

Applications to the Teacher Education Program should be made when you declare a major. This should be no later than your fifth semester and prior to enrolling in EDU 221: Educational Psychology. We encourage you to talk with our faculty prior to making your official application, because individual programs may require earlier planning to complete all their requirements. See student forms for all relevant forms.  

Requirements for the Teacher Education Program

1.    Completion of 10 hours of field experience, usually completed in EDU 101 or through arrangement with an education professor.

2.    Reading and writing proficiency, demonstrated by a score of 290 or better on the English section of the College BASE (Basic Academic Subject Examination) and a  grade of C or better in the first year tutorial or a designated writing course.

3.    Mathematics proficiency, demonstrated by a score of 290 or better on the College BASE.  

4.    Basic computer literacy, demonstrated by completion of the tutorial.

5.    Ability to handle college-level work, demonstrated by being in good academic standingand a facultyrecommendation.

6.    Good citizenship in the college community, demonstrated by maintaining appropriate personal conduct and academic honesty.

7.    Interest in working with children or adolescents, demonstrated by student’s personal statement and faculty recommendation.

The College BASE

The College BASE (Basic Academic Subject Examination) is a test of basic skills in the general areas of English and mathematics. Students need a minimum score of 290 out of 500 in each area to be accepted into the Teacher Education Program. The College BASE will be given each yearat the start of the second semester. There is a fee for the exam. Preparation materials are available through the Steiner office. Students should try to take the exam in their sophomore year. If they are entitled to accommodations in their Grinnell classes, similar accommodations can be made on the College BASE. Students may retake the exam after consultation with an education faculty member.  If necessary, an individualized plan to address areas of concern will be developed.

Faculty Advising

Once you have been accepted into the Teacher Education Program, you will be assigned two advisors, one in your subject area (such as biology or history), and one in the education department. If you prefer, you may request a particular professor for your subject advisor. As long as you remain in the program, you will need to get registration approval from both faculty members.

Licensure Requirements

All practitioner candidates must successfully complete the following distribution requirements.

General Education Requirements for Secondary Licensure 

  1. One (1) course in American history or American government, 3 or 4 credit, or AP credit if awarded college credit.
  2. One (1) course in mathematics, 3 or 4 credit, or AP credit if awarded college credit.
  3. Course work in both biological and physical sciences. This requirement may be met by one of the following:
    • one (1) course in biology and one (1) course in chemistry, physics, or geology; or
    • one (1) course in environmental science (approved by Education Department) and one (1) course in physical science; or
    • ANT-104, plus one (1) course in physical science; or
    • PSY-113, plus one (1) course in physical science; or
    • SOC-260, plus one (1) course in physical science.
  4. One (1) course in Humanities
  5. Freshman Tutorial, its equivalent or a designated writing course.

Teacher Education Program Core Courses Required for Licensure

  • EDU 101: Education Principles in a Pluralistic Society 
  • EDU 2xx: One course at the 210-217 series
  • EDU 221: Educational Psychology 
  • EDU 250: Differentiating Instruction for All Learners 
  • EDU 340: Research, Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 341-346: Discipline Specific Methods

For all secondary licensure, at least one subject area endorsement is required.  There are specific requirements for each endorsement that may differ from the requirements for a major. Some areas may require a course that is offered only every other year or as a special independent course, so careful planning is imperative. Consult with an education department faculty member for assistance in planning. Listed below are the endorsement requirements for each department. 

Endorsements

In order for students to obtain licensure from the state of Iowa students must fulfill state and college requirements of specialization within a field outside the education department. Students can recieve endorsement from any of the following departments. Listed below are the endorsement requirements for each department.

English as a Second Language

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult (4 credits)
  • EDU 469.06: Student Teaching Internship in Teaching ESL (12 credits)

ESL Requirements

Completion of 20 semester hours of coursework in English as a second language to include the following:

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult (4 credits)
  • EDU 346: Theory and Methods in Teaching and Learning in ESL/Bilingual Education (2 credits)
  • EDU 341-345: Research and Methods in Teaching in the Discipline (2 credits)
  • LIN 111: Introduction to Linguistics (4 credits)
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
    • ANT 260: Language and Culture 
    • PSY 355: Psychology of Language
  • EDU 213: Critical Issues in Second Language Acquisition (4 credits)
English

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 341: Research and Methods in Teaching and Learning in Language Arts and Reading
  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 469.01 Laboratory Practice and Practicum in Secondary Teaching 

English Requirements

Option 1: Completion of a 30 semester hours teaching major, which must minimally include the following:

  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
    • ENG 230: English Historical Linguistics
    • LIN 114: Introduction to General Linguistics
  • Two of the following courses (8 credits):
  • ENG 227: American Literary Traditions I
  • ENG 228: American Literary Traditions II
  • ENG 229: The Tradition of African-American Literature
  • ENG 231: American Literary Traditions III
  • ENG 232: Ethnic American Literatures
  • ENG 325: Studies in Ethnic American Literatures
  • ENG 326: Studies in American Poetry I
  • ENG 328: Studies in American Poetry II
  • ENG 329: Studies in African-American Literature
  • ENG 330: Studies in American Prose I
  • ENG 331: Studies in American Prose II
  • ENG 223: Traditions of English Literature I
  • ENG 224: Traditions of English Literature II
  • ENG 121: Introduction to Shakespeare
  • ENG 223: The Traditions of English Literature I
  • ENG 310: Studies in Shakespeare
  • ENG 225: Introduction to Postcolonial Literature
  • ENG 273: Feminisms, Gender, and Literary Theory
  • ENG 303: Chaucer
  • ENG 314: Milton
  • ENG 316: Studies in English Renaissance Literature
  • ENG 323: Studies in English Literature I: 1660-1778
  • ENG 327: The Romantics
  • ENG 332: The Victorians
  • ENG 337: The British Novel I
  • ENG 338: The British Novel II
  • ENG 345: Studies in Modern Poetry
  • ENG 346: Studies in Modern Prose
  • ENG 349: Medieval Literature
  • ENG 360: Seminar in Postcolonial Literature
  • ENG 390: Literary Theory
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • Total Credits: 30

Option 2: Completion of 24 semester hours in English/Language Arts, including the following courses:

  • ENG 224: Traditions of English Literature II (4 credits)
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
    • ENG 230: English Historical Linguistics
    • LIN 114: Introduction to General Linguistics
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • ENG 227: American Literary Traditions I
  • ENG 228: American Literary Traditions II
  • ENG 231: American Literary Traditions III
  • ENG 229: The Tradition of African-American Literature
  • ENG 232: Ethnic American Literatures
  • ENG 325: Studies in Ethnic American Literatures
  • ENG 326: Studies in American Poetry I
  • ENG 328: Studies in American Poetry II
  • ENG 329: Studies in African-American Literature
  • ENG 330: Studies in American Prose I
  • ENG 331: Studies in American Prose II
  • ENG 121: Introduction to Shakespeare
  • ENG 223: The Tradition of English Literature I
  • ENG 310: Studies in Shakespeare
  • ENG 225: Introduction to Postcolonial Literature
  • ENG 273: Feminisms, Gender, and Literary Theory
  • ENG 303: Chaucer
  • ENG 314: Milton
  • ENG 316: Studies in English Renaissance Literature
  • ENG 323: Studies in English Literature I: 1660-1798 
  • ENG 327: The Romantics
  • ENG 332: The Victorians
  • ENG 337: The British Novel I
  • ENG 338: The British Novel II
  • ENG 345: Studies in Modern Poetry
  • ENG 346: Studies in Modern Prose
  • ENG 349: Medieval Literature
  • ENG 360: Seminar in Postcolonial Literature
  • ENG 390: Literary Theory
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • Total Credits: 24
French

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 344: Research and Methods in Teaching and Learning in Second Language Acquisition
  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 469.02 Laboratory Practice and Practicum in Secondary Teaching 

French Requirements

Option 1: Completion of a 32 semester hours teaching major, which must minimally include the following (note: this option fulfills the requirements for a French major):

  • FRN 301: Advanced Oral and Written Expression (4 credits)
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
    • FRN 303: French Civilization I
    • FRN 304: French Civilization II
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • FRN 312: Introduction to French Literature from the Middle Ages to the Revolution
  • FRN 313: Introduction to French Literature of the 19th and 20th Centuries
  • Electives in French* (must include 4 credits in literature other than FRN 312 and FRN 313) (20 credits)
  • Total Credits: 32

*Credits earned while studying in French may substitute for some electives.

*FRN 201: French Speaking is recommended 

 Option 2: Completion of 24 semester hours in French, including the following courses:

  • FRN 301: Advanced Oral and Written Expression (4 credits)
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
    • FRN 303: French Civilization I
    • FRN 304: French Civilization II
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • FRN 312: Introduction to French Literature from the Middle Ages to the Revolution
  • FRN 313: Introduction to French Literature of the 19th and 20th Centuries
  • Electives in French (12 credits)
  • Total Credits: 24
German

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 344: Research and Methods in Teaching and Learning in Second Language Acquisition
  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 469.02 Laboratory Practice and Practicum in Secondary Teaching 

German Requirements

Option 1: Completion of a 32 semester hours teaching major, which must minimally include the following (note: this option fulfills the requirements for a German major):

  • GRM 302: Studies in German Literature (4 credits)
  • GRM 495: Advanced Seminar in German Studies (4 credits)
  • Three electives* below 300-level (12 credits)
  • Three electives at or above 300-level (12 credits) 
  • Total Credits: 32

*Credits earned while studying in Germany may substitute for some electives. Students who place out of the first two years of college German may with permission from German faculty select 8 of the needed elective credits from German history or culture courses offered in other departments.

Option 2: Completion of 24 semester hours in German, including the following courses:

  • GRM 221: Intermediate German I (4 credits)
  • GRM 222: Intermediate German II (4 credits)
  • GRM 302: Studies in German Literature (4 credits)
  • GRM 326: Topics in German Culture (4 credits)
  • Two additional German literature courses at the 300-level (8 credits)
  • Total Credits: 24
Latin

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 344: Research and Methods in Teaching and Learning in Second Language Acquisition
  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 469.02 Laboratory Practice and Practicum in Secondary Teaching 

Latin Requirements

Option 1: Completion of a 32 (or 33) semester hours teaching major, which must minimally include the following (note: this option fulfills the requirements for a Latin major):

  • LAT 323: Virgil (4 credits)
  • LAT 334: Roman Lyric Poetry (4 credits)
  • LAT 387: Individual Reading (4 credits)
  • CLS 256: History of Rome (4 credits)
  • One of the following courses (4 or 5 credits)
    • LAT 222: Intermediate Latin
    • LAT 225: Reading Latin
  • Two of the following courses (8 credits):
  • LAT 318: Roman Satire
  • LAT 333: Roman Historians
  • LAT 344: Roman Thought
  • LAT 387: Individual Reading
  • LAT 395: Advanced Special Projects
  • One elective in classics (4 credits)
  • Total Credits: 32

Option 2: Completion of 24 (or 25) semester hours in Latin, including the following courses:

  • LAT 323: Virgil (4 credits)
  • LAT 334: Roman Lyric Poetry (4 credits)
  • LAT 387: Individual Reading (4 credits)
  • One of the following courses (4 or 5 credits)
    • LAT 222: Intermediate Latin
    • LAT 225: Reading Latin
  • Two of the following courses (8 credits):
  • LAT 318: Roman Satire
  • LAT 333: Roman Historians
  • LAT 344: Roman Thought
  • LAT 387: Individual Reading
  • LAT 395: Advanced Special Projects
  • Total Credits: 24

NOTE: Credits earned while studying in off-campus programs may count towards requirements.

Russian

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 344: Research and Methods in Teaching and Learning in Second Language Acquisition
  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 469.02 Laboratory Practice and Practicum in Secondary Teaching 

Russian Requirements

Option 1: Completion of a 33 semester hours teaching major, which must minimally include the following (note: this option fulfills the requirements for a Russian major):

  • RUS 102: Beginning Russian II (5 credits)
  • RUS 221: Intermediate Russian I (4 credits)
  • RUS 222: Intermediate Russian II (4 credits)
  • RUS 243: Modern Russian Literature (4 credits)
  • RUS 331: Readings in Russian Cultural History, 19th Century (4 credits)
  • RUS 332: Readings in Russian Cultural History, 20th Century (4 credits)
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
    • RUS 351: Dostoevsky
    • RUS 361: Tolstoy
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • RUS 495: Seminar in Russian Literature and Linguistics I
  • RUS 495: Seminar in Russian Literature and Linguistics II
  • Total Credits: 33

Option 2: Completion of 25 semester hours in Russian, including the following courses:

  • RUS 102: Beginning Russian II (5 credits)
  • RUS 221: Intermediate Russian I (4 credits)
  • RUS 222: Intermediate Russian II (4 credits)
  • Electives in Russian (12 credits)
  • Total Credits: 25
Spanish

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 344: Research and Methods in Teaching and Learning in Second Language Acquisition
  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 469.02 Laboratory Practice and Practicum in Secondary Teaching 

Spanish Requirements

Option 1: Completion of a 32 semester hours teaching major, which must minimally include the following (note: this option fulfills the requirements for a Spanish major):

  • SPN 343: The Art of Language (4 credits)
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
    • SPN 377: Modernization & Innovation in Contemporary Spanish America
    • SPN 383: The Spanish American Colonial World
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • SPN 385: Cervantes and his World
  • SPN 386: Studies in Medieval & Golden Age Literature
  • Electives in Spanish (20 credits)
  • Total Credits: 32

Option 2: Completion of 24 semester hours in Spanish, including the following courses:

  • SPN 343: The Art of Language (4 credits)
  • SPN 285: Reading & Discussion of Hispanic Texts
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
    • SPN 217: Intermediate Spanish
    • Any other 200- or 300-level course conducted in Spanish
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • SPN 377: Modernization & Innovation in Contemporary Spanish America
  • SPN 383: The Spanish American Colonial World
  • SPN 385: Cervantes and his World
  • SPN 386: Studies in Medieval & Golden Age Literature
  • SPN 311: Traditions of Independent Spanish America
  • SPN 312: Literary Traditions of 20th Century Spain
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • One of the following courses (4 credits)
  • Total Credits: 24
Mathematics

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 344: Research and Methods in Teaching and Learning in Quantitative Literacy
  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 469.054 Laboratory Practice and Practicum in Secondary Teaching 

Mathematics Requirements

Option 1A: Completion of a 36 (or 40) semester hours teaching major, which must minimally include the following (note: this option fulfills the requirements for a mathematics major):

  • MAT 215: Linear Algebra (includes geometric interpretation) (4 credits)
  • MAT 321: Foundations of Algebra (4 credits)
  • MAT 131: Calculus I (includes analytical geometry) (4 credits)
  • MAT 133: Calculus II (4 credits)
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
    • CSC 151: Fundamentals of Problem Solving
    • CSC 152: Fundamentals of Problem Solving II
    • CSC 153: Computer Science Fundamentals
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • MAT 209: Applied Statistics
  • MAT 336: Probability and Statistics II
  • MAT 316: Foundations of Analysis (4 credits)
  • MAT 218: Combinatorics
  • MAT 220: Differential Equations
  • MAT 324: Number Theory
  • MAT 326: Field Theory
  • MAT 331: Topology
  • MAT 335: Probability and Statistics
  • MAT 338: Complex Analysis
  • One of the following (4 credits):
  • One or two of the following electives* (4 or 8 credits):
  • Total Credits: 36 or 40

(NOTES: The mathematics major requires a one year-long sequence such as the following: 316 & 331, 316 & 338, 321 & 324, 321 & 326, 335 & 336. The math major also requires four courses at the 300-level or higher. )

Option 1B: Completion of a 44 semester hours teaching major, which must minimally include the following (note: this option fulfills the requirements for a computer science major):

  • MAT 215: Linear Algebra (includes geometric interpretation) (4 credits)
  • MAT 131: Calculus I (includes analytical geometry) (4 credits)
  • MAT 133: Calculus II (4 credits)
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
    • CSC 152: Fundamentals of Problem Solving II
    • CSC 153: Computer Science Fundamentals
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • MAT 115: Introduction to Statistics
  • MAT 209: Applied Statistics
  • MAT 336: Probability and Statistics II
  • MAT 218: Combinatorics (4 credits)
  • CSC 301: Algorithms (4 credits)
  • CSC 302: Programming Language Concepts (4 credits)
  • CSC 211: Computer Organization and Architecture
  • CSC 213: Operating Systems and Parallel Algorithms
  • CSC 223: Software Design
  • CSC 362: Compilers
  • CSC 341: Automata, Formal Languages and Computational Complexity
  • CSC 321: Foundations of Abstract Algebra
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • Total Credits: 44

Option 2: Completion of 24 semester hours in mathematics, including the following courses:

  • MAT 215: Linear Algebra (includes geometric interpretation) (4 credits)
  • MAT 131: Calculus I (includes analytical geometry) (4 credits)
  • MAT 133: Calculus II (4 credits)
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
    • CSC 151: Fundamentals of Problem Solving
    • CSC 152: Fundamentals of Problem Solving II
    • CSC 153: Computer Science Fundamentals
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • MAT 115: Introduction to Statistics
  • MAT 209: Applied Statistics
  • MAT 335: Probability and Statistics
  • MAT 218: Combinatorics
  • MAT 220: Differential Equations
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
  • Total Credits: 24
Biology

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 345: Research and Methods in Teaching and Learning in the Sciences
  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 469.05: Laboratory Practice and Practicum in Secondary Teaching 

Biology Requirements

Option 1: Completion of a 32 semester hours teaching major, which must minimally include the following (note: this option fulfills the requirements for a biology major):

  • BIO 150: Introduction to Biological Inquiry (4 credits)
  • BIO 251: Molecules, Cells and Organisms (4 credits)
  • BIO 252: Organisms, Evolution and Ecology (4 credits)
  • Electives in biology (with a maximum of 4 credits in independent work, ie. BIO 297, BIO 397 or BIO 399) (20 credits)
  • Total Credits: 32

Option 2: Completion of 24 semester hours in biology, including the following courses:

  • BIO 150: Introduction to Biological Inquiry (4 credits)
  • BIO 251: Molecules, Cells and Organisms (4 credits)
  • BIO 252: Organisms, Evolution and Ecology (4 credits)
  • Electives in biology (12 credits)
  • Total Credits: 24

Option 3: Completion of 30 semester hours in the broad area of sciences to include 15 semester hours in biology:

  • BIO 150: Introduction to Biological Inquiry (4 credits)
  • BIO 251: Molecules, Cells and Organisms (4 credits)
  • BIO 252: Organisms, Evolution and Ecology (4 credits)
  • One elective in biology (4 credits)
  • Electives in the broad area of science (14 credits)
  • Total Credits: 30
Chemistry

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 345: Research and Methods in Teaching and Learning in the Sciences
  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 469.05: Laboratory Practice and Practicum in Secondary Teaching

Chemistry Requirements

Option 1: Completion of a 32 semester hours teaching major, which must minimally include the following (note: this option fulfills the requirements for a chemistry major):

  • CHM 129: General Chemistry (4 credits)
  • CHM 130: Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry (4 credits)
  • CHM 221: Organic Chemistry I (4 credits)
  • CHM 222: Organic Chemistry II (4 credits)
  • CHM 363: Physical Chemistry I (4 credits)
  • Two chemistry electives at the 300- and/or 400-levels (8 credits)
  • One of the following options (4 credits):
    • CHM 397: Independent Project
    • CHM 399: Directed Summer Research
  • Total Credits: 32

Option 2: Completion of 24 semester hours in chemistry, including the following courses:

  • CHM 129: General Chemistry (4 credits)
  • CHM 130: Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry (4 credits)
  • CHM 221: Organic Chemistry I (4 credits)
  • CHM 222: Organic Chemistry II (4 credits)
  • CHM 363: Physical Chemistry I (4 credits)
  • One elective in chemistry (4 credits)
  • Total Credits: 24

Option 3: Completion of 30 semester hours in the broad area of sciences to include 15 semester hours in chemistry:

  • CHM 129: General Chemistry (4 credits)
  • CHM 130: Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry (4 credits)
  • CHM 221: Organic Chemistry I (4 credits)
  • CHM 222: Organic Chemistry II (4 credits)
  • Four electives in the broad area of science (14 credits)
  • Total Credits: 30
General Science

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 345: Research and Methods in Teaching and Learning in the Sciences
  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 469.05: Laboratory Practice and Practicum in Secondary Teaching 

General Science Requirements

Option 1: Completion of a 40 semester hours teaching major, which must minimally include the following (note: this option fulfills the requirements for a general science major):

  • Biological Science--both of the following courses (8 credits):
    • BIO 135: Structure and Functions of Organisms
    • BIO 136: Evolution and Ecology
  • Chemistry--both of the following courses (8 credits):
  • CHM 129: General Chemistry
  • CHM 130: Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry
  • PHY 131: General Physics I
  • PHY 132: General Physics II
  • Concentration in biology, chemistry, math, or physics (16 credits)
  • Choose one sequence:
    • MAT 127 and 128: Calculus and Probability I and II
    • MAT 131 and 132: Calculus I and II
  • Physics--both of the following courses (8 credits):
  • Other
  • Total Credits: 40

Option 2: Completion of 24 semester hours in general science, including the following courses:

  • Biological Science--both of the following courses (8 credits):
    • BIO 135: Structure and Functions of Organisms
    • BIO 136: Evolution and Ecology
  • Chemistry--both of the following courses (8 credits):
  • CHM 129: General Chemistry
  • CHM 130: Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry
  • PHY 131: General Physics I
  • PHY 132: General Physics II
  • Physics--both of the following courses (8 credits):
  • Total Credits: 24
Physical Science

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 345: Research and Methods in Teaching and Learning in the Sciences
  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 469.05: Laboratory Practice and Practicum in Secondary Teaching

Physical Science Requirements

Option 1: Completion of a 32 semester hours teaching major, which must minimally include the following (note: this option fulfills the requirements for a physical science major):

Option 2: Completion of 24 semester hours in physical science, including the following courses:

  • Physics--PHY 131: General Physics I (4 credits)
  • Chemistry--one of the following courses (4 credits):
    • CHM 100: Chemistry is Everywhere
    • CHM 129: General Chemistry
  • Earth/Space Sciences--one of the following courses (4 credits):
  • PHY 116: The Universe and Its Structure
  • ENV 111: Introductory Geology
  • Electives in physics, chemistry, or earth science (12 credits)
  • Total Credits: 24
Physics

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 345: Research and Methods in Teaching and Learning in the Sciences
  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 469.05: Laboratory Practice and Practicum in Secondary Teaching

Physics Requirements

Option 1: Completion of a 32 semester hours teaching major, which must minimally include the following (note: this option fulfills the requirements for a physics major):

  • PHY 131: General Physics (4 credits)
  • PHY 132: General Physics II (4 credits)
  • PHY 232: Modern Physics (4 credits)
  • PHY 234: Mechanics (4 credits)
  • PHY 335: Electromagnetic Theory (4 credits)
  • PHY 337: Optics and Other Wave Phenomena (4 credits)
  • PHY 462: Advanced Laboratory (2 credits)
  • Electives in physics (6 credits)
  • Total Credits: 32

Option 2: Completion of 24 semester hours in physics, including the following courses:

  • PHY 131: General Physics (4 credits)
  • PHY 132: General Physics II (4 credits)
  • PHY 232: Modern Physics (4 credits)
  • Electives in physics (24 credits)
  • Total Credits: 24

Option 3: Completion of 30 semester hours in the broad area of social sciences to include 15 semester hours in physics:

  • PHY 131: General Physics (4 credits)
  • PHY 132: General Physics II (4 credits)
  • PHY 232: Modern Physics (4 credits)
  • One elective in physics (4 credits)
  • Electives in the broad area of science (14 credits)
  • Total Credits: 30
American Government

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 343: Research and Methods in Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences
  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 469.03: Laboratory Practice and Practicum in Secondary Teaching

American Government Requirements

Students can pursue one of three possible paths through the education program with an American government endorsement.

Option 1: Completion of a 32 semester hour teaching major which must minimally include the following courses:

  • POL 101: Introduction to Political Science (4 credits)
  • One of the following (4 credits):
    • POL 250: Politics of International Relations
    • POL 251: International Political Economy
  • One of the following (4 credits):
  • POL 255: Comparative Politics I
  • POL 264: Political Theory II
  • MAT 115: Introduction to Statistics
  • MAT 209: Applied Statistics
  • POL 2XX: Public Policy
  • POL 219: Constitutional Law & Politics
  • POL 222: Welfare State, Politics and Society
  • POL 237: Political Parties
  • POL 239: The Presidency
  • One of the following (4 credits):
  • Two of the following (8 credits):
  • One elective in POL at the 200-level and one elective in POL at the 300-level or above (8 credits)
  • Total Credits: 32

Option 2: Completion of 24 semester hours in American government to include the following:

  • POL 101: Introduction to Political Science
  • Four of the following (16 credits)
    • POL 2XX: Public Policy
    • POL 219: Constitutional Law & Politics
    • POL 222: Welfare State, Politics and Society
    • POL 237: Political Parties
    • POL 239: The Presidency
  • One of the following (4 credits):
  • POL 250: Politics of International Relations
  • POL 251: International Political Economy
  • Total Credits: 24

Option 3: Completion of 30 semester hours in the broad area of social sciences to include 15 semester hours in American government:

  • POL 101: Introduction to Political Science (4 credits)
  • Three of the following (12 credits):
    • POL 2XX: Public Policy
    • POL 219: Constitutional Law & Politics
    • POL 222: Welfare State, Politics and Society
    • POL 237: Political Parties
    • POL 239: The Presidency
  • One of the following (4 credits):
  • MAT 115: Introduction to Statistics
  • MAT 209: Applied Statistics
  • Electives in the broad area of social sciences (10 credits)
  • Total Credits: 30
American History

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 343: Research and Methods in Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences
  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 469.03: Laboratory Practice and Practicum in Secondary Teaching

American History Requirements

Students can pursue one of three possible paths through the education program with an American history endorsement.

Option 1: Completion of a 30 semester hour teaching major which must minimally include the following courses (note: this option fulfills requirements for a history major):

  • Historical Methods--HIS 100: Making History (4 credits)
  • American History--five electives in American (or Latin American) history (20 credits)
  • US Minority History--one of the following courses (4 credits):
    • HIS 222: History of Women in the US
    • HIS 225: Native American History, 1491-1865
    • HIS 227: African-American History
    • HIS 228: US Immigration History
  • Advanced Study--one of the following courses (4 credits):
  • HIS 3XX: Advanced Studies in History
  • HIS 397: Advanced Independent Study
  • HIS 411: Senior Essay
  • Total Credits: 32

Option 2: Completion of 24 semester hours in American history to include the following:

  • Historical Methods--HIS 100: Making History (4 credits)
  • Electives--three electives in American history (12 credits)
  • US Minority History--one of the following courses (4 credits):
    • HIS 222: History of Women in the US
    • HIS 225: Native American History, 1491-1865
    • HIS 227: African-American History
    • HIS 228: US Immigration History
  • Advanced Study--one of the following courses (4 credits):
  • HIS 3XX: Advanced Studies in History
  • HIS 397: Advanced Independent Study
  • Total Credits: 24

Option 3: Completion of 30 semester hours in the broad area of social sciences to include 15 semester hours in American history:

  • Historical Methods--HIS 100: Making History (4 credits)
  • Electives (22 credits)
  • Two electives in American history (8 credits)
  • Four electives in the broad area of social sciences (14 credits)
  • Advanced Study--one of the following courses (4 credits):
    • HIS 3XX: Advanced Studies in History
    • HIS 397: Advanced Independent Study
  • Total Credits: 30
Anthropology

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 343: Research and Methods in Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences
  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 469.03: Laboratory Practice and Practicum in Secondary Teaching

Anthropology Requirements

Students can pursue the following path through the education program with an anthropology endorsement.

Options 2 and 3 (of 24 and 30 semester hours, respectively) are not presently being offered at Grinnell College. Interested students may pursue these paths for a second (minor) endorsement and should contact the education program department chair for further information. 

Completion of a 32 semester hour teaching major which must minimally include the following courses (note: this option fulfills the requirements for a major in anthropology):

  • ANT 104: Introduction to Anthropology (4 credits)
  • ANT 280: Theories of Culture (4 credits)
  • Three electives in anthropology (including two 300-level courses or one 300-level course and a senior thesis) (12 credits)
  • Archaeology or Biological Anthropology--one of the following courses (4 credits):
    • ANT 205: Human Evolution
    • ANT 221: Primate Behavior and Taxonomy
    • ANT 225: Human Variation
    • ANT 261: Agriculture, Religion, and Empire: Old World Prehistory
    • ANT 262: Archaeology of North America
    • ANT 267: Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas
    • ANT 321: Human Ethology
    • ANT 325: Biological Basis of Human Society
    • ANT 375: Experimental Archaeology and Ethnoarchaeology
  • Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics--one of the following courses (4 credits):
  • ANT 200: Cultural Politics of Hybridity
  • ANT 210: Illness, Healing, and Culture
  • ANT 235: The Anthropology of American Culture
  • ANT 238: Cultural and Political Ecology
  • ANT 240: Intentional Communities
  • ANT 242: African Cultures
  • ANT 246: Anthropology of the Modern Middle East and North Africa
  • ANT 247: Contemporary Europe
  • ANT 251: Native North American Indian Culture
  • ANT 252: Culture and Agriculture
  • ANT 253: Anthropology of Ethnicities
  • ANT 257: Latin American Cultures
  • ANT 260: Language, Culture, and Society
  • ANT 265: Ethnography of Communication
  • ANT 310: Postmodernism and Beyond
  • ANT 326: Anthropology of Religion
  • ANT 290: Archaeology Field Methods
  • ANT 291: Methods of Empirical Investigation
  • ANT 292: Ethnographic Research in Complex Societies
  • Methodology--one of the following courses (4 credits):
  • Total Credits: 32

NOTE: One year of language study and a semester of statistics is required for the anthropology major. Off-campus study and/or an internship are strongly recommended.

Economics

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 343: Research and Methods in Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences
  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 469.03: Laboratory Practice and Practicum in Secondary Teaching 

Economics Requirements

Students can pursue one of three possible paths through the education program with an economics endorsement.

Option 1: Completion of a 32 semester hours teaching major, which must minimally include the following (Note: this option fulfills the requirements for an economics major):

  • ECN 111: Introduction to Economics (4 credits)
  • ECN 262: Empirical Methods in Economics (2 credits)
  • ECN 280: Microeconomic Analysis (4 credits)
  • ECN 282: Macroeconomic Analysis (4 credits)
  • One elective in economics (4 credits)
  • One history course from those approved by the economics department (4 credits)
  • One of the following courses (4 credits):
    • ECN 303: History of Economic Thought I
    • ECN 304: History of Economic Thought II
    • ECN 312: Advanced Econometrics 
    • ECN 326: Financial and Managerial Accounting
    • ECN 327: Corporate Finance
    • ECN 338: Applied Game Theory
    • ECN 339: Mathematical Economics
  • Two of the following courses (8 credits):
  • ECN 366: Seminar in Health Economics
  • ECN 368: Seminar in Labor Economics
  • ECN 369: Seminar in Environmental Economics
  • ECN 370: Seminar in Political Economy
  •  ECN 372: Seminar in Economic Development
  •  ECN 374: Seminar in International Trade
  •  ECN 375: Seminar in International Finance
  •  ECN 376: Seminar in Income Distribution
  •  ECN 378: Seminar in Law and Economics
  •  ECN 380: Seminar in Monetary Policy
  •  ECN 382: Seminar in Industrial Organization
  •  ECN 384: Seminar in Economics of Education
  •  
  • Total Credits: 34

Option 2: Completion of 24 semester hours in economics, including the following courses:

  • ECN 111: Introduction to Economics (4 credits)
  • ECN 280: Microeconomic Analysis (4 credits)
  • ECN 282: Macroeconomic Analysis (4 credits)
  • MAT 115: Introduction to Statistics (4 credits)
  • Two electives in economics (8 credits)
  • Total Credits: 24

Option 3: Completion of 30 semester hours in the broad area of social sciences to include 15 semester hours in economics:

  • ECN 111: Introduction to Economics (4 credits)
  • ECN 280: Microeconomic Analysis (4 credits)
  • ECN 282: Macroeconomic Analysis (4 credits)
  • MAT 115: Introduction to Statistics (4 credits)     
  • One elective in economics (4 credits)
  • Electives in other social sciences (10 credits)
  • Total Credits: 30
Psychology

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 343: Research and Methods in Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences
  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 469.03: Laboratory Practice and Practicum in Secondary Teaching

Psychology Requirements

Students can pursue one of three possible paths through the education program with a psychology endorsement.

Option 1: Completion of a 32 semester hour teaching major which must minimally include the following courses (note: this option fulfills the requirements for a major in psychology):

  • PSY 113: General Psychology (4 credits)
  • One of the following (4 credits):
    • MAT 115: Introduction to Statistics
    • MAT 209: Applied Statistics
  • Two elective courses in psychology (8 credits)
  • Four of the following courses (16 credits):
    • PSY 213: Social Psychology
    • PSY 233: Developmental Psychology
    • PSY 243: Behavioral Analysis
    • PSY 246: Physiological Pschology
    • PSY 260: Cognitive Psychology
    • PSY 317: Psychology of Personality
  • Total Credits: 32

Option 2: Completion of 24 semester hours in psychology to include the following:

  • PSY 113: General Psychology (4 credits)
  • One of the following (4 credits):
    • MAT 115: Introduction to Statistics
    • MAT 209: Applied Statistics
  • Two of the following courses (8 credits):
    • PSY 243: Behavioral Analysis
    • PSY 246: Physiological Pschology
    • PSY 260: Cognitive Psychology
    •  
  • Two of the following courses (8 credits):
    • PSY 213: Social Psychology
    • PSY 233: Developmental Psychology
    • PSY 248: Abnormal Psychology
  • (Coursework at the 300-level is encouraged but not required)
  • Total Credits: 24

Option 3: Completion of 30 semester hours in the broad area of social sciences to include 15 semester hours in psychology:

  • PSY 113: General Psychology (4 credits)
  • PSY 246: Physiological Pschology (4 credits)
  • PSY 248: Abnormal Psychology (4 credits)
  • One of the following courses (4 credits)
    • PSY 213: Social Psychology
    • PSY 233: Developmental Psychology
    • PSY 243: Behavioral Analysis
    • PSY 260: Cognitive Psychology
  • Electives in the broad area of social sciences (16 credits)
  • Total Credits: 30
Sociology

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 343: Research and Methods in Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences
  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 469.03: Laboratory Practice and Practicum in Secondary Teaching

Sociology Requirements

Students can pursue one of three possible paths through the education program with a sociology endorsement.

Option 1: Completion of a 30 semester hour teaching major which must minimally include the following courses (note: this option fulfills requirements for a sociology major):

  • SOC 111: Introduction to Sociology  (4 credits)
  • SOC 248: Self and Society  (4 credits)
  • SOC 250: Social Inequality  (4 credits)
  • SOC 285: Contemporary Sociological Theory  (4 credits)
  • SOC 291: Methods of Empirical Investigation  (4 credits)
  • Two electives in sociology  (8 credits)
  • One of the following two courses (4 credits):
    • SOC 270: Women, Men, and Society
    • SOC 320: The Family
  • Total Credits: 32

Option 2: Completion of 24 semester hours in sociology to include the following:

  • SOC 111: Introduction to Sociology (4 credits)
  • SOC 248: Self and Society (4 credits)
  • SOC 250: Social Inequality (4 credits)
  • SOC 270: Women, Men, and Society (4 credits)
  • Two electives in sociology (8 credits) 
  • Total Credits: 24

Option 3: Completion of 30 semester hours in the broad area of social sciences to include 15 semester hours in sociology:

  • SOC 111: Introduction to Sociology (4 credits)
  • SOC 248: Self and Society (4 credits)
  • SOC 250: Social Inequality (4 credits)
  • SOC 270: Women, Men, and Society (4 credits)
  • Electives in the broad area of social science (14 credits) 
  • Total Credits: 30
World History

Education Program Requirements

  • EDU 340: Research and Methods in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 343: Research and Methods in Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences
  • EDU 460: Seminar in Teaching the Young Adult
  • EDU 469.03: Laboratory Practice and Practicum in Secondary Teaching

World History Requirements

Students can pursue one of three possible paths through the education program with a world history endorsement.

Option 1: Completion of a 30 semester hour teaching major which must minimally include the following courses (note: this option fulfills requirements for a history major):

  • Historical Methods--HIS 100: Making History (4 credits)
  • Africa and Latin America--one of the following courses (4 credits):
    • HIS 201: Colonial Latin America
    • HIS 202: Modern Latin America
    • HIS 204: Radical Movements in 20th Century Latin America
    • HIS 261: Southern Africa
    • HIS 262: Modern Africa from the Sahara to the Zambezi
    • HIS 295 if relevant
  • Ancient Greece and Rome--one of the following courses (4 credits):
  • HIS 255: History of Ancient Greece
  • HIS 256: History of Rome
  • HIS 295 if relevant
  • HIS 275: Chinese History I
  • HIS 276: Chinese History II
  • HIS 277: Japanese History I
  • HIS 278: Japanese History II
  • HIS 295 if relevant
  • HIS 233: Medieval Europe 800-1350
  • HIS 234: Europe in Renaissance and Reformation 1350-1650
  • HIS 235: Britain in the Modern World I
  • HIS 241: Origins of Modern Russia
  • HIS 295 if relevant
  • HIS 236: Britain in the Modern World II
  • HIS 237: France from Absolutism to Democracy 1789-1918
  • HIS 238: Germany from Unification to Reunification
  • HIS 242: Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union
  • HIS 295 if relevant
  • HIS 211: Colonial and Revolutionary America, 1450-1788
  • HIS 212: Democracy in America
  • HIS 214: The American Civil War and Reconstruction
  • HIS 220: US Environmental History
  • HIS 225: Native American History, 1491-1865
  • HIS 228: The Promised Land: US Immigration History
  • HIS 222: History of Women in the US
  • HIS 227: African-American History
  • HIS 295 if relevant
  • HIS 313: Race in Early America
  • HIS 327: Labor in 20th Century Latin America
  • HIS 33X: Advanced Studies in Western European and British History
  • HIS 34X: Advanced Studies in Russian History
  • HIS 37X: Advanced Studies in Asian History
  • HIS 395: Advanced Environmental History of the Midwest
  •  HIS 397: Advanced Independent Study on relevant topic
  •  HIS 411: Senior Essay on relevant topic
  • Asia--one of the following courses (4 credits):
  • Early Europe--one of the following courses (4 credits):
  • Modern Europe--one of the following courses (4 credits):
  • North America--one of the following courses (4 credits):
  • Advanced Study--one of the following courses (4 credits):
  • Total Credits: 32

Option 2: Completion of 24 semester hours in world history to include the following:

  • Historical Methods--HIS 100: Making History (4 credits)
  • Colonialism and Post-Colonialism--one of the following courses (4 credits):
    • HIS 201: Colonial Latin America
    • HIS 202: Modern Latin America
    • HIS 211: Colonial and Revolutionary America, 1450-1788
    • HIS 235: Britain in the Modern World I
    • HIS 236: Britain in the Modern World II
    • HIS 261: Southern Africa
    • HIS 262: Modern Africa from the Sahara to the Zambezi
    • HIS 295 if relevant
  • Ancient Greece and Rome--one of the following courses (4 credits):
  • HIS 255: History of Ancient Greece
  • HIS 256: History of Rome 
  • HIS 295 if relevant
  • HIS 275: Chinese History I
  • HIS 277: Japanese History I
  • HIS 278: Japanese History II
    • HIS 295 if relevant
  • HIS 276: Chinese History II
  • Asia--one of the following courses (4 credits):
  •  
  •  
  • Two electives in history, one at the 300-level
  • Total Credits: 24

Option 3: Completion of 30 semester hours in the broad area of social sciences to include 15 semester hours in world history:

  • Historical Methods--HIS 100: Making History (4 credits)
  • Colonialism and Post-Colonialism--one of the following courses (4 credits):
    • HIS 201: Colonial Latin America
    • HIS 202: Modern Latin America
    • HIS 211: Colonial and Revolutionary America, 1450-1788
    • HIS 261: Southern Africa
    • HIS 262: Modern Africa from the Sahara to the Zambezi
    • HIS 295 if relevant
  • Ancient Greece and Rome--one of the following courses (4 credits):
  • HIS 255: History of Ancient Greece
  • HIS 256: History of Rome 
  • HIS 295 if relevant
  • HIS 275: Chinese History I
  • HIS 276: Chinese History II
  • HIS 277: Japanese History I
  • HIS 278: Japanese History II
  • HIS 295 if relevant
  • Asia--one of the following courses (4 credits):
  • Electives in the broad area of social science, one at the 300-level (14 credits)
  • Total Credits: 30

Non-Licensure Options

Options for Those Not Seeking Licensure

If you are not sure that you want to earn a teaching license at Grinnell College, but are interested in teaching in some other venue or are interested in other education-based careers, such as school psychology, educational philosophy, policy, or law, you have several options open to you through our education department. We offer several courses of interest to the general student at Grinnell. Our introductory course, Educational Principles in a Pluralistic Society (EDU 101) addresses current topics in education using a philosophical and historical frame. At the 200 level, we offer several policy/philosophy courses that may interest you:

  • EDU 210: Historical Perspectives on US Education.
  • EDU 211: The Politics of Educational Assessment explores the historical and present day uses of testing and assessment to effect school change.
  • EDU 212: Critical Pedagogy and School Reform focuses on critical pedagogical approaches to reforming schools.
  • EDU 213: Critical Issues in Second Language Acquisition addresses issues of equity and effectiveness in English as a second language and other second language learners.
  • EDU 214: School Math and math Equity looks at how we understand the physical world and explores challenges to learning science.
  • EDU 215: Youth and Youth Cultures focuses on the literacy practices of young people in and out of school.
  • EDU 217: Educational Psychology
Internships

Students interested in education can participate in school-based internships or internships that introduce one to the policy/administrative aspects of education. In recent years, students have conducted internships in curricular reform, after-school programs, drop-out prevention, museum education and place-based pedagogy. If you are interested in an education focused internship, you should contact either an education department faculty member or someone in the Career Development Office to discuss your ideas.

Other Teaching Options

If you are interested in teaching at the college level, for the Peace Corps, Grinnell Corps, Teach For America or in areas such as environmental education, you could prepare yourself by taking a methods course in your discipline. The methods courses are theory based courses that help students make a theory to practice connection through peer teaching and a short teaching experience in the schools. To enroll in any of our methods courses, you will need to have taken at least EDU 101 and EDU 221: Educational Psychology.

Research Options

Students who are interested in graduate work in education should consider participating in an independent study or Mentored Advanced Project with an education professor. Sometimes, a semester of independent study can lead to a good MAP project. In recent years, students have worked with Professors Michaels, Hutchison and Ketter on a variety of projects. In many cases, students have presented their MAP research at regional or national conferences, and such an experience is invaluable for anyone contemplating graduate work in education or other related disciplines.