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Faulconer Gallery to Feature ‘En Voyage: Hybridity and Vodou in Haitian Art’

The Faulconer Gallery will open an exhibition titled “En Voyage: Hybridity and Vodou in Haitian Art” on Thursday, Jan. 25. Curated by nine Grinnell students as part of an art history seminar, this exhibition includes prominent works by Haitian American artist Edouard Duval-Carrié.

The renowned artist was an international visiting fellow last fall at Grinnell College, where he collaborated with students to create an original piece of art. The mixed-media installation, which explores ideas and images of freedom and abolition, will be displayed in the College’s Humanities and Social Studies Complex, which is under construction and scheduled to open in 2020.

Fredo Rivera ’06, assistant professor of art history, taught the Exhibition Seminar during the fall semester. Under his guidance, the student curators built an exhibition around four of Duval-Carrié’s paintings.

They focused on themes of hybridity and displacement, and how Haitian art and Vodou encapsulate African, European, and indigenous traditions. Vodou, also known as Voodoo, is a dominant religion in Haiti.

“In the United States, Vodou is often the subject of misunderstanding and stigmatization,” says Ellen Taylor ’19, who helped curate the exhibition. “Through an exhibition of diverse works of art across time and medium, we aspire to showcase the depth and complexity of this religious tradition.”

Duval-Carrié will attend several events marking the opening of the exhibition on Jan. 25.

  • At 11 a.m. Laurent Dubois, professor of romance studies and history at Duke University, will present the Scholars’ Convocation lecture titled “Democracy at the Roots: Culture and Sovereignty in Haiti.” The free, public lecture will start at 11 a.m. Joe Rosenfield ‘25 Center, Room 101.
  • At 4 p.m. Rivera and student curators will introduce their exhibition and discuss the themes and works on view at the Faulconer Gallery in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, 1108 Park St., Grinnell. An opening reception will follow at 5 p.m.

“This exhibition provides a unique look at the politics of migration and creative ingenuity within Haitian art,” Rivera says. “I hope viewers will not only learn about the incredible breadth and brilliance of Haitian art, but connect it more broadly to themes of displacement and creation evident throughout the humanities.

“As a teacher,” he adds, “the most exciting part for me has been observing the teamwork and initiative of the nine curators. The opportunity to travel together and have discussions with museum professionals across the nation has been amazing and greatly informed this endeavor.”

Student curators enrolled in the seminar traveled to Miami galleries and museums and to relevant museums throughout Iowa to explore Haitian art, thanks to an Innovation Fund Grant and funding from Institute for Global Engagement. They selected four major works by Duval-Carrié from his personal collection, a private collection in Miami, and the Figge Art Museum in Davenport. These form the core of the show.

The students then chose a diversity of Haitian works from the Waterloo Center for the Arts, which has the largest public collection of Haitian art in the world; the Grinnell College Art Collection, and the personal collection of Karen Lowell and David Campbell, Henry R. Luce Professor of Nations and the Global Environment and chair of environmental studies. The students’ catalog and related programs will place these works into a broader context and explore the themes central to the exhibition seminar. The students have been responsible for every part of the project from exhibition layout, to selection of speakers, to catalog contents.

Events

The following events in conjunction with the exhibition will take place in Faulconer Gallery:

Feb. 2, 11 a.m.
Professor Campbell will speak about works from his personal collection featured in “En Voyage: Hybridity and Vodou in Haitian Art.”
Feb. 20, 11 a.m.
Kesho Scott, associate professor American studies and sociology at Grinnell, will discuss the ways in which the Haitian Revolution affected the culture and population of modern Haiti.
Feb. 21, 4 p.m.
Screening: Of Men and Gods, a documentary about the daily life of several openly gay Haitian men who are also Vodou practitioners.
Feb. 22, 11 a.m.
Doug Hess, assistant professor of political science, will discuss selected works in the exhibition within the context of modern and historical Haitian society, as well as his experiences working with Haitians on human rights and pro-democracy projects in Haiti.
Feb. 24, 1:30-3 p.m.
Community Day offers opportunities for people of all ages to view two concurrent exhibitions: “En Voyage: Hybridity and Vodou in Haitian Art” and “Making Life Visible: Art, Biology and Visualization.” Hands-on activities will include making mermaids.
March 14, 4 p.m.
Artists@Grinnell featuring Erol Josué, a Haitian singer, dancer, and Vodou priest, who will give a performance lecture on Vodou traditions and religious music. Co-sponsored by the College’s music and religious studies departments.

    “En Voyage: Hybridity and Vodou in Haitian Art” will continue at the Faulconer Gallery through March 18. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week and admission is free.

    Destigmatizing Menstruation through Art

    Jen Lewis, artist of Beauty in Blood will give a free, public talk titled "Destigmatizing Menstruation through Art" at 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 19, 2017, in Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, Faulconer Gallery.

    Lewis’ project, "Beauty in Blood," is a conceptual feminist art project aimed at reducing the stigma of menstruation. She works with her partner, photographer Rob Lewis, to capture and select photographs of her menstrual blood being poured over various clear vessels. By using menstrual blood as her medium, Lewis hopes to normalize menstruation and show that it is a healthy part of life.

    "Frankly, I do not think there is any place in modern society for taboo subjects, especially in as far as women are concerned," she says. "Pacifying social taboos only serves to give more power to society than to the self, and as women we have done that for far too long. The time is now to shut down the long-held shame and squeamishness surrounding menstruation.

    "My work," she adds, "quashes this taboo, reclaims feminine power, and puts this subject on the pedestal it so rightly deserves. The images I capture force the viewer to think about menstruation in an entirely new way. Capturing the artful quality of this natural occurrence is my way of progressing society's view and conversation around menstruation as well as redefining some traditional fine arts aesthetic notions."

    The Faulconer Gallery Artists@Grinnell series and Grinnell College's Sexual Health and Information Center are sponsoring the exhibition.

    Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week and admission is free. The Faulconer Gallery is in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, 1108 Park St., Grinnell.

     A photograph from the Beauty in Blood project

    A photograph from the "Beauty in Blood" project © Jen Lewis and Rob Lewis

     

    James McBride & The Good Lord Bird Band

    Bestselling author, musician, and screenwriter James McBride and The Good Lord Bird Band will perform at the next Writers@Grinnell event.

    Writers at GrinnellA Writers@Grinnell roundtable with James McBride will take place at 4:15 p.m. Thursday, April 13, 2017, in Rosenfield Center, Room 209. At 8 p.m. that evening in Herrick Chapel, James McBride and The Good Lord Bird Band will give a performance and lecture. The public is welcome at the free events.

    James McBride is an author, musician and screenwriter. His landmark memoir, The Color of Water, rested on the New York Times bestseller list for two years. It is considered an American classic and is read in schools and universities across the United States.  His debut novel, Miracle at St. Anna, was translated into a major motion picture directed by American film icon Spike Lee. It was released by Disney/Touchstone in September 2008.  James wrote the script for Miracle At St. Anna and co-wrote Spike Lee's 2012 Red Hook Summer. His novel, Song Yet Sung, was released in paperback in January 2009. His latest novel, The Good Lord Bird, about American revolutionary John Brown, is the winner of the 2013 National Book Award for Fiction. 

    James is also a former staff writer for The Boston Globe, People Magazine, and The Washington Post. His work has appeared in Essence, Rolling Stone, and The New York Times. His April 2007 National Geographic story “Hip Hop Planet” is considered a respected treatise on African American music and culture.

    James is a native New Yorker and a graduate of New York City public schools. He studied composition at The Oberlin Conservatory of Music in Ohio and received his master's degree in journalism from Columbia University in New York at age 22. He holds several honorary doctorates and is currently a distinguished writer in residence at New York University.

    The events are sponsored by Writers@Grinnell, Office of Diversity & Inclusion, Music Department, Center for Humanities, American Studies, Intercultural Affairs, and Artists@Grinnell.

    Artists Ligia Bouton, Joan Linder at Faulconer Gallery

     In March the Faulconer Gallery will feature talks by artists Ligia Bouton and Joan Linder ’92.

    Bouton will speak on Thursday, March 2, and Linder on Thursday, March 9. Both events, which are free and open to the public, will begin at 4 p.m. in the Faulconer Gallery in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, 1108 Park St., Grinnell.

    Born in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Bouton spent her childhood in London and studied at both Vassar College and the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University. Her creative work combines sculpture and drawing with performance, digital video and photography. Each project wrestles with the intersection of functionality and narrative, drawing on sources from art history, classical and contemporary literature and science.

    Her projects have been installed in New York at Bill Maynes Gallery and Denise Bibro Fine Art, in Colorado at the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art and in New Jersey at City Without Walls. Her video work has been included in national and international festivals, including The Female Avant Garde Festival in Prague.

    Grinnell College owns a large drawing and a glass wall sculpture by Bouton. Both are on view in the Print and Drawing Study Room in Burling Library, 1111 Sixth Ave., Grinnell. The room is open from 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday through Friday and by appointment.

    Linder uses drawing to uncover how history can be buried: as artifacts in the ground, and as documents in the archive. Her work is currently on view in the exhibition "Operation Sunshine" at the Faulconer Gallery (through March 19). Linder will be a visiting artist at Grinnell from March 6 through 10, sponsored by Artists@Grinnell.

    In her public talk on March 9, Linder will discuss how her art explores brownfields and toxic waste sites near Niagara Falls, and delves into the related documents. A reception will follow in the rotunda of the Bucksbaum Center. Her talk is part of the Symposium on Technology and Human Rights, sponsored by the Rosenfield Program in Public Affairs, International Relations and Human Rights.

    In addition, Linder invites individuals to observe her creative process and interact with her during Drawing in the Gallery events from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 7, and from 10 a.m. to noon and 1 to 3 p.m. on Wednesday, March 8. While in the gallery, she will be hand-copying documents for her Toxic Archive.

    Linder is a native of suburban New York, and now lives and works in Brooklyn and Buffalo, New York. She is department chair and an associate professor of drawing at the University of Buffalo. Her work focuses on drawings that transform mundane subjects into rich images, delving into themes such as the politics of war and sexual identity and power.

    Her work has been displayed throughout the United States and in countries around the world, including Brazil, Denmark, Germany, Israel, Japan and South Korea. She is currently represented by Mixed Green Gallery in New York City.

    The Faulconer Gallery is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, with the exception of major holidays. The gallery presents exhibitions of regional, national and international significance. In addition, the gallery serves the educational mission of the College while also giving students and the general public the chance to interact with a diverse range of artistic exhibitions, from easel paintings and installation art to drawings and video.

    Grinnell College welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. Accommodation requests may be made to Conference Operations.

    The College welcomes the presence of minors at all age-appropriate public events and for informal visits, with the understanding that a parent, legal guardian, or other responsible adult assumes full responsibility for their child’s safety and behavior during such visits or events. In these cases, the College expects that an adult responsible for the visiting child takes measures to ensure the child’s safety and sees that the child complies with directions of college personnel. Grinnell College is not responsible for supervision of minors on campus.

    Crossing the Line: Selections from the Grinnell College Art Collection

    The Faulconer Gallery will open a new exhibition at the start of second semester. "Crossing the Line" features more than 50 works from the college's art collection — prints, paintings, drawings, maps, books, photographs and objets d'art, which connect to current issues of global discourse and reveal lines crossed and repercussions dealt.

    "This exhibition is intended to bring up current global issues that are identified by works in the collection," Daniel Strong, associate director of Faulconer Gallery and curator of exhibitions, explains. "'Crossing the Line' is widely varied in media and visually very stimulating, illustrating issues such as migration and immigration, incarceration and revolution, and how these issues reshape identities.

    "These are issues in the news, and the collection relates to them. The art collection is here to be instructive and to make people think, not just look at or soothe, but to edify and question."

    Grinnell College faculty, students and staff will write some of the texts that will accompany works in the exhibition, lending their expertise and personal experience to an understanding of the art. They will be on hand for an open conversation event on Thursday, Feb. 23, to interact with the the public offering information and points of view about each work.

    Director of Faulconer Gallery Lesley Wright says many of the works in "Crossing the Line" are recent acquisitions, some as recent as December, purchased from the college's endowed funds.

    "The Grinnell College Art Collection houses historically and culturally rich works of social and political commentary from many periods and media," she adds. "The collection in general deals with social issues, and we can build different exhibitions in different contexts. 'Crossing the Line,' for example, is offered in conjunction with 'Rethinking Global Cultures,' a yearlong project sponsored by the college's Center for the Humanities."

    Faulconer Gallery will host a series of free, public events related to the exhibition:

    • 20 Minutes@11, Tuesday, Feb. 7, 11 a.m., with Daniel Strong, associate director and curator of exhibitions. He will speak about Damon Davis' "All Hands on Deck," a work included in "Crossing the Line" that was created during the Ferguson, Mo., protests following the death of Michael Brown.
    • Artists@Grinnell, Thursday, Feb. 9, 4 p.m., with Haitian-born artist and curator Edouard Duval-Carrié, who incorporates religious traditions and the history of Haiti, the Caribbean and Florida, into his art with a wide range of images.
    • Panel: "Crossing the Line" and Identity, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 4 p.m., with faculty panelists who will explore, through professional and personal experience, how crossing a line can reshape an identity or create multiple identities. Moderated by Caleb Elfenbein, associate professor of history and religious studies; director, Center for the Humanities.
    • "Crossing the Line:" An Open Conversation, Thursday, Feb. 23, 4 p.m., with selected faculty, staff and students stationed by a work of art of their choice. The audience will move among them for conversations from both personal and professional points of view.
    • Community Day, Saturday, Feb. 25, 1:30 – 3 p.m. Participants of all ages are welcome to tour the exhibitions and enjoy a variety of hands-on activities and refreshments.
    • Concert: Piano by Royce Wolf, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 11 a.m. Wolf, associate professor of mathematics and statistics, will play selections by Mendelssohn, Rzweski, Ives and Mozart.

    Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week and admission is free. The Faulconer Gallery is in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, 1108 Park St., Grinnell. For more information about the exhibitions and related programs, call 641-269-4660.

    Grinnell College welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. Information on parking and accessibility is available on the college website. Accommodation requests may be made to Conference Operations at 641-269-3235 or calendar[at]grinnell[dot]edu.

    The college also welcomes the presence of minors at all age-appropriate public events and for informal visits, with the understanding that a parent, legal guardian, or other responsible adult assumes full responsibility for their child's safety and behavior during such visits or events. In these cases the college expects that an adult responsible for the visiting child takes measures to ensure the child's safety and sees that the child complies with directions of college personnel. Grinnell College is not responsible for supervision of minors on campus.
     

    Joan Linder: Operation Sunshine

    The Faulconer Gallery will open a new exhibition on January 27, 2017. In her exhibition, "Operation Sunshine," Joan Linder '92 investigates the environmental history of brownfields and toxic waste sites near Niagara Falls by making meticulous drawings of the empty fields, chain link fences and the files stored away in archives. She uses drawing to consider how history can get buried: as artifacts and chemicals in the ground, and as documents in the archive. The act of drawing becomes a way to slow down and pay attention anew to the damage that has become hidden in plain sight.

    "Operation Sunshine" includes more than 80 drawings of actual sites and documents, which she recreates by hand to tell a story such as 1950s research about the impact of radioactive fallout. On March 7 and 8, visitors will have the opportunity to observe Linder's work-in-progress, "Toxic Archive," as she draws in the gallery (see below for details). "Operation Sunshine" is offered in conjunction with the college's Rosenfield Symposium on Technology and Human Rights, March 7-9.

    Faulconer Gallery will host a series of free, public events related to the exhibition:

    • Artists@Grinnell, Thursday, Feb. 9, 4 p.m., with Haitian-born artist and curator Edouard Duval-Carrié, who incorporates religious traditions and the history of Haiti, the Caribbean and Florida, into his art with a wide range of images.
    • Community Day, Saturday, Feb. 25, 1:30 – 3 p.m. Participants of all ages are welcome to tour the exhibitions and enjoy a variety of hands-on activities and refreshments.
    • Concert: Piano by Royce Wolf, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 11 a.m. Wolf, associate professor of mathematics and statistics, will play selections by Mendelssohn, Rzweski, Ives and Mozart.
    • 20 Minutes@11, Wednesday, March 1, 11 a.m., with Liz Queathem, senior lecturer in biology, who will speak about a selected work from "Operation Sunshine," while considering the environmental impact of toxins in Iowa.
    • Artists@Grinnell Drawing in the Gallery, Tuesday, March 7, 12:30 – 4:30 p.m. and Wednesday, March 8, 10 a.m. – noon and 1 – 3 p.m. Visiting artist Joan Linder will work on her "Toxic Archive," drawings of documents related to toxic waste sites.

    Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week and admission is free. The Faulconer Gallery is in the Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, 1108 Park St., Grinnell. For more information about the exhibitions and related programs, call 641-269-4660.

    Grinnell College welcomes the participation of people with disabilities. Information on parking and accessibility is available on the college website. Accommodation requests may be made to Conference Operations at 641-269-3235 or calendar[at]grinnell[dot]edu.

    The college also welcomes the presence of minors at all age-appropriate public events and for informal visits, with the understanding that a parent, legal guardian, or other responsible adult assumes full responsibility for their child's safety and behavior during such visits or events. In these cases the college expects that an adult responsible for the visiting child takes measures to ensure the child's safety and sees that the child complies with directions of college personnel. Grinnell College is not responsible for supervision of minors on campus.

    Artist and Adventurer Nina Elder Comes to Campus

    Faulconer Gallery will host artist and adventurer Nina Elder for a week-long residency, which includes a narrative presentation of her work, “Nonlinear Creative Research: From Piles of Rocks to Polar Bears,“ made possible through the gallery's Artists@Grinnell program.

    The presentation is scheduled for 4 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 15, in the Faulconer Gallery, Bucksbaum Center for the Arts. The event is free and open to the public.

    Elder travels to some of the most environmentally impacted, geographically distant, and economically important places on the globe. She explored Alaska and the Western Arctic, researching how the natural environment is changing through human-centered activities, gathering more stories, images, ideas and correlations than can be translated into traditional two-dimensional art work.

    The result is an evolving narrative presentation that art critic and author Lucy Lippard called "Something that embodies a social energy not yet defined as art."

    The presentation is equal parts travelogue, artist talk, poetic narrative and a scrutiny of assumptions about the North. It weaves together unlikely associations between piles of rocks, Elder's father's untold military history, climate change, Native cultures, obsolete communication technology and the need for curiosity.

    Writers@Grinnell: Kirstin Valdez Quade and Lydia Conklin

    Award winning artists Kirstin Valdez Quade and Lydia Conklin will read from their work and discuss writing on Thursday, Nov. 10, as part of Writers@Grinnell.  The event, which is free and open to the public, will start at 8 p.m. in the Joe Rosenfield '25 Center, Room 101.

    In addition, Valdez Quade will lead a roundtable discussion, which is free and open to the public, at 4:15 p.m., Nov. 10, in the Joe Rosenfield '25 Center, Room 209.

    Kirstin Valdez Quade is the author of Night at the Fiestas, which won the John Leonard Kirstin Valdez Quade ImagePrize from the National Book Critics Circle, the Sue Kaufman Prize for First Fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a “5 Under 35” award from the National Book Foundation, and was a finalist for the New York Public Library Young Lions Award. It was a New York Times Notable Book, and was named a best book of 2015 by the San Francisco Chronicle and the American Library Association. Kirstin is the recipient of the Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer’s Award and the 2013 Narrative Prize. Her work has appeared in The New YorkerThe Best American Short Stories, The O. Henry Prize Stories, and elsewhere. She was a Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford University, where she also taught as a Jones Lecturer. She’s been on the faculty in the M.F.A. programs at University of Michigan and Warren Wilson, and is an Assistant Professor at Princeton.

    Lydia Conklin ImageLydia Conklin is the 2015-2017 Creative Writing Fellow in fiction at Emory University. She has received a Pushcart Prize, work-study scholarships from Bread Loaf, and fellowships from MacDowell, Yaddo, the James Merrill House, the Vermont Studio Center, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, Millay, Jentel, Lighthouse Works, Brush Creek, the Santa Fe Art Institute, Caldera, the Sitka Center, and Harvard University, among others, and grants and awards from the Astraea Foundation, the Puffin Foundation, the Massachusetts Cultural Council, the Alliance of Artists Communities, and the Council for Wisconsin Writers. Her fiction has appeared in The Southern Review, Narrative Magazine, New Letters, The New Orleans Review, The Gettysburg Review, and elsewhere. She has drawn graphic fiction for Gulf Coast, Drunken Boat, The Florida Review, and the Steppenwolf Theater in Chicago. She holds an MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

    This event is co-sponsored by Writers@Grinnell and Artists@Grinnell.

    Creativity Workshop Led by Lynda Barry & Dan Chaon

    Author and artist Lynda Barry, along with author Dan Chaon, will lead a Creativity Workshop from 4 to 7 p.m. Friday, September 30, in Joe Rosenfield ’25 Center, Room 101.

    Dan ChaonLynda Barry and Dan Chaon have been teaching together for the last three years and have developed a set of writing exercises that are part of their upcoming book, Workbook 52. This workshop is about a way of creating a sustainable writing practice for anyone at any level who may be interested in writing and is having a hard time figuring out how to start or continue a story. 

    It’s based on using a common but extraordinary sort of memory almost of all of us have; the instant kind that ‘floods’ us when a certain smell or a song triggers a vivid image of certain place-in-time. It’s the kind of memory that is unwilled and vivid, something that feels somehow on-going and plastic, a living place where a story is happening. We’ll learn an easy method to create the circumstances for these kinds of images to come to us and set them down quickly in writing. We’ll start by using autobiographical memory, and then show how to apply it to writing fiction.

    Lynda BarryLynda Barry has worked as a painter, cartoonist, writer, illustrator, playwright, editor, commentator, and teacher and found they are very much alike. The New York Times has described Barry as “among this country’s greatest conjoiners of words and images, known for plumbing all kinds of touchy subjects in cartoons, comic strips, and novels, both graphic and illustrated.”

    Barry has authored 21 books, including the beloved novel Cruddy which was called “a work of terrible beauty” by The New York Times and the award-winning book What It Is, based on her now famous “Writing the Unthinkable” workshop. Barry is currently assistant professor in interdisciplinary creativity at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and runs the Image Lab at the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery. Barry has received numerous awards and honors for her work, among them two William Eisner awards, the American Library Association’s Alex Award, the Wisconsin Library Association’s RR Donnelly Award, the Washington State Governor’s Award, and the Holtz Center for Science & Technology Outreach Fellowship.

    Dan Chaon is the acclaimed author of Among the Missing, which was a finalist for the National Book Award, and You Remind Me of Me, which was named one of the best books of the year by The Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, San Francisco Chronicle, The Christian Science Monitor, and Entertainment Weekly, among other publications. Chaon’s fiction has appeared in many journals and anthologies, including The Best American Short Stories, Pushcart Prize, and The O. Henry Prize Stories. He has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award in Fiction, and he was the recipient of the 2006 Academy Award in Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Chaon lives in Cleveland, Ohio, and teaches at Oberlin College, where he is the Pauline M. Delaney Professor of Creative Writing.

    The event is co-sponsored by Artists@Grinnell, Public Event series, and Writers@Grinnell.

    Film Screening: Called to Walls

    Dave Loewenstein ’88 is returning to campus — along with co-directors Nick Ward and Amber Hansen — for a panel discussion and film screening of Called to Walls. The free, public event will begin at 7 p.m. Friday, May 6, in ARH Auditorium, Room 302.

    Called to Walls is "part road-movie, part inspirational small town drama, and part art documentary" that chronicles the making of giant murals in the city cores of places like Newton and Joplin, Mo.

    For Loewenstein, there’s more to creating a mural than just painting the side of a building. He designs political activism prints and specializes in community-based collaborative public art projects. He’s worked on murals all over the United States, including Grinnell, as well as in Korea, Northern Ireland, and Brazil. In his experience, making a piece of public art has encouraged conversations (and offers of help) from passers-by, resulting in what he calls an “improvised gathering space.”

    The events are sponsored by Alumni in the Classroom and Artists@Grinnell.

    Dave Loewenstein ’88

    Dave LoewensteinDave Loewenstein is a muralist, writer, and printmaker based in Lawrence, Kansas. In addition to his more than twenty public works in Kansas, examples of his dynamic and richly colored community-based murals can be found across the United States in Missouri, Oklahoma, Arizona, Arkansas, Texas, South Dakota, Mississippi, Iowa, Chicago, New Orleans, and New York City, and in Northern Ireland and South Korea.

    Loewenstein’s prints, which focus on current social and political issues, are exhibited nationally and are in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, Yale University,  and the Center for the Study of Political Graphics in Los Angeles. He is the co-author of Kansas Murals: A Traveler’s Guide, a 2007 Kansas Notable Book Award Winner, published by the University Press of Kansas; and the co-director of the documentary film Creating Counterparts which won Best Documentary at the 2003 Kansas Filmmakers Jubilee.

    Loewenstein has been recognized widely for his work, including the 2001 Lighton Prize for Arts Educator of the Year from Kansas City Young Audiences, the 2004 Tom and Anne Moore Peace and Justice Award given by the Lawrence Coalition for Peace and Justice, a 2006 Phoenix Award from the Lawrence Arts Commission, a 2007 Kansas Press Association 1st Place Columnist Award for his column “Blank Canvas,” and in 2014 he was named one of the founding Cultural Agents for the new U.S. Department of Arts and Culture. His most recent studio project is Give Take Give, funded by the Rocket Grants program.