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Student Activism and the Role of Student Newspapers

“Student Activism and the Role of Student Newspapers, 1967-1970” is now on display in Burling Gallery on the lower level.

Using newspapers and photos from the Special Collections and Archives, this exhibit looks at the alternative and underground newspapers printed by Grinnell students between 1967 and 1970. The changing, and often tumultuous, cultural and political landscape of the 1960s and 1970s lent itself particularly well to the creation of alternative newspapers.

Alternative newspapers at Grinnell created a space to stage dialogues and demonstrations, and connect students to larger movements outside of Grinnell that related to both local and national issues.

These student publications also pushed the boundaries of the purpose of newspapers in fascinating ways. Among the newspapers included are the Pterodactyl, the High and Mighty, the Brotherhood, and a variety of single-issue publications.

Any items in the display and mentioned in the brochure are available for library patrons to examine at Special Collections, also located on the lower level of Burling.

This exhibit was curated by Hana Lord ’18, with poster design by Han Trinh ’17.

Fracking Our Land

Tuesday, April 19, 2016 - 7:30pm to 9:30pm
Joe Rosenfield '25 Center Room 101

Panel of writers, thinkers, environmentalists to discuss fracking on April 19
Conversation will be based on first anthology of creative writing that explores fracking

A panel of four Iowa-based writers, editors, thinkers and environmentalists will discuss "Fracture: Essays, Poems, and Stories on Fracking in America," the country's first anthology of creative writing that explores hydraulic fracking, at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, April 19, at Grinnell College.

Debra Marquart, Carolyn Raffensperger, Frederick Kirschenmann and Taylor Brorby will all read their work from the anthology and explore impacts of hydraulic fracking on Iowa.

The event, which is free and open to the public, will take place in room 101 of the Joe Rosenfield '25 Center, 1115 Eighth Ave., Grinnell.

Marquart is a professor of English at Iowa State University, teaching in the Master of Fine Arts program in Creative Writing and Environment. The author of a memoir, "The Horizontal World: Growing up Wild in the Middle of Nowhere" and two poetry collections, she has received numerous honors for her work, including John Guyon Nonfiction Award, the Mid-American Review Nonfiction Award, a New York Times Editor's Choice commendation and a 2008 National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Prose Fellowship.

Raffensperger is an environmental lawyer specializing in the changes in law and policy necessary to address climate change and preserve public health and the environment. She is executive director of the Science and Environmental Health network, and has edited three comprehensive volumes on the precautionary principle of environmental law. Her work has been featured in Gourmet magazine, the Utne Reader, Yes! Magazine, the Sun, Whole Earth and Scientific American.

A national expert in sustainable agriculture, Kirschenmann is a family farmer, writer and scholar on ecology. He has held numerous appointments, including U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Organic Standards Board and the National Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production. His farm has been featured in numerous publications, including National Geographic, Business Week, Audubon and Gourmet magazine, for its diverse crop rotation and productivity without using synthetic inputs. His book, "Cultivating an Ecological Conscience: Essays from a Farmer Philosopher," traces the evolution of his ecological and farming philosophy over the past 30 years.

The editor of "Fracture," Taylor Brorby is an award-winning essayist, poet and environmentalist. He is currently pursuing his MFA in Creative Writing and Environment at Iowa State University. His work has been featured in "Rock, Paper, Scissors," "The Englewood Review of Books," on Minnesota Public Radio, North Dakota Public Radio and in numerous newspapers. A talented writer himself, he is currently working on two poetry collections, one related to the Bakken oil boom and the other about the Adirondacks in upstate New York, as well as an essay collection about western North Dakota.

Sponsoring the event are the Center for Prairie Studies and Environmental Studies.

Alternative Universities as Sites of Creativity

Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 7:30pm to 9:30pm
Joe Rosenfield '25 Center Room 101

 

Artists to give talks on alternative universities as sites of creativity
Bruce High Quality Foundation University, Vincent Katz to lecture and hold workshop

Artists from the Bruce High Quality Foundation University (BHQFU) and Vincent Katz, a professor of art at Yale University, will give talks on alternative universities as sites of creativity on Wednesday, April 20 at Grinnell College. The free and public talks will take place at 7:30 p.m. in room 101 of the Joe Rosenfield '25 Center, 1115 Eighth Ave., Grinnell.

Earlier that day, the founders of BHQFU will hold a workshop, "B.Y.O.U.: Build Your Own University," in the Masonic Temple downtown, 928 Main St., Grinnell. The workshop on teaching and learning will take place from 1-3 p.m. It is free and open to the public. 

The founders of BHQFU will discuss "How to Die an Artist: Resistance and Futility." BHQFU, founded in 2009, is New York's Freest Art School. It provides tuition-free classes, residencies, workshops, exhibitions and public programs to a community of thousands of New Yorkers. The school is an alternative to contemporary art schools that emphasize professionalization.

Katz, a professor at the Yale University of Art, will discuss "Black Mountain College: Finding the Center in the Remote." His lecture will cover the pedagogy of Black Mountain College in terms of its location and locus, especially as related to the college’s later years. He also will discuss Black Mountain’s relevance today, as a model, and also consider parallels to modern remotely-operated web-based experience of culture.

Katz is a celebrated poet, critic, translator, editor and curator. His criticism has been published in numerous books, catalogues and journals, including in "Apollo," "Art in America," "ARTnews" and "Art on Paper," among others. He is also the author of “The Complete Elegies Of Sextus Propertius,” winner of the National Translation Award in 2005. 

He has curated several celebrated exhibitions, including an exhibition on Black Mountain College for the Reina Sofia museum in Madrid, and “Street Dance: The New York Photographs of Rudy Burckhardt” for the Museum of the City of New York.

The Center for Humanities is sponsoring these events as part of this year's theme: Sites of Creativity: Streets, Salons, Studios, and Schools.
 

Alternative Universities as Sites of Creativity

Artists from the Bruce High Quality Foundation University (BHQFU) and Vincent Katz, a professor of art at Yale University, will give talks on alternative universities as sites of creativity on Wednesday, April 20, at Grinnell College.

The free and public talks will take place at 7:30 p.m. Joe Rosenfield ’25 Center, Room 101.

Earlier that day, the founders of BHQFU will hold a workshop, “B.Y.O.U.: Build Your Own University,” in the Masonic Temple downtown, 928 Main St., Grinnell. The workshop on teaching and learning will take place from 1-3 p.m. It is free and open to the public.

The founders of BHQFU will “How to Die an Artist: Resistance and Futility.” BHQFU, founded in 2009, is New York’s Freest Art School. It provides tuition-free classes, residencies, workshops, exhibitions and public programs to a community of thousands of New Yorkers. The school is an alternative to contemporary art schools that emphasize professionalization.

A professor at the Yale University of Art, Katz will discuss “Black Mountain College: Finding the Center in the Remote.” His lecture will cover the pedagogy of Black Mountain College in terms of its location and locus, especially as related to the college’s later years. He also will discuss Black Mountain’s relevance today, as a model, and also consider parallels to modern, remotely-operated web-based experience of culture.

Katz is a celebrated poet, critic, translator, editor and curator. His criticism has been published in numerous books, catalogs, and journals, including in Apollo, Art in America, ARTnews and Art on Paper, among others. He is also the author of The Complete Elegies Of Sextus Propertius, winner of the National Translation Award in 2005.  

He has curated several celebrated exhibitions, including an exhibition on Black Mountain College for the Reina Sofia museum in Madrid, and Street Dance: The New York Photographs of Rudy Burckhardt for the Museum of the City of New York.

The Center for Humanities is sponsoring these events as part of this year's theme: Sites of Creativity: Streets, Salons, Studios, and Schools.

Fracture: Essays, Poems, and Stories on Fracking in America

A panel of four Iowa-based writers, editors, thinkers, and environmentalists will discuss Fracture: Essays, Poems, and Stories on Fracking in America, the country's first anthology of creative writing that explores hydraulic fracturing, at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, April 19, in Joe Rosenfield '25 Center, Room 101. The discussion is free and open to the public.

Debra Marquart, Carolyn Raffensperger, Frederick Kirschenmann, and Taylor Brorby will all read their work from the anthology and explore impacts of hydraulic fracking on Iowa.

The Center for Prairie Studies and the Environmental Studies Concentration are sponsoring the event.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. You can request accommodations from Conference Operations and Events.

Debra Marquart

Marquart is a professor of English at Iowa State University, teaching in the Master of Fine Arts program in Creative Writing and Environment. The author of a memoir, The Horizontal World: Growing up Wild in the Middle of Nowhere and two poetry collections, she has received numerous honors for her work, including John Guyon Nonfiction Award, the Mid-American Review Nonfiction Award, a New York Times Editor's Choice commendation, and a 2008 National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Prose Fellowship.

Carolyn Raffensperger

Raffensperger is an environmental lawyer specializing in the changes in law and policy necessary to address climate change and preserve public health and the environment. She is executive director of the Science and Environmental Health network, and has edited three comprehensive volumes on the precautionary principle of environmental law. Her work has been featured in Gourmet magazine, the Utne Reader, Yes! Magazine, the Sun, Whole Earth, and Scientific American.

Frederick Kirschenmann

A national expert in sustainable agriculture, Kirschenmann is a family farmer, writer, and scholar on ecology. He has held numerous appointments, including director of the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture at Iowa State University. He also has served on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Organic Standards Board and the National Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production. His farm has been featured in numerous publications, including National Geographic, Business Week, Audubon, and Gourmet magazine, for its diverse crop rotation and productivity without using synthetic inputs. His book, Cultivating an Ecological Conscience: Essays from a Farmer Philosopher, traces the evolution of his ecological and farming philosophy over the past 30 years.

Taylor Brorby

The editor of Fracture, Taylor Brorby is an award-winning essayist, poet and environmentalist. He is currently pursuing his masters of fine arts in Creative Writing and Environment at Iowa State University. His work has been featured on Minnesota Public Radio and North Dakota Public Radio and in numerous newspapers. A talented writer himself, he is currently working on two poetry collections, one related to the Bakken oil boom and the other about the Adirondacks in upstate New York, as well as an essay collection about western North Dakota.

Nelson Ogbuagu ’16 Wins Short Story Contest

Grinnell College senior and winner of the Nick Adams Short Story Contest, Nelson Ogbuagu Nelson Ogbuagu ’16 has been named the winner of the Associated Colleges of the Midwest 2016 Nick Adams Short Story Contest. His story, "Playing it Safe," was selected from the 32 stories submitted by students from ACM colleges.

Author Bill Hillman, who served as the final judge for the contest, awarded first prize to Ogbuagu, praising his story as “a psychological thriller and a coming of age tale of an introspective and sensitive youth” that “works on a lot of levels.”

A Chicago native, Ogbuagu is an economics major. His interest in writing, inspired by his love for hip-hop music and storytelling, started in high school, where he served as both an arts and entertainment and a sports editor.

He began to write short stories in a creative writing course he took at Grinnell with author Dean Bakopoulos, assistant professor of English.

“His mentorship, teaching, feedback, and general support as I developed in his classes and outside of them not only made me a better storyteller through writing, but also encouraged a type of self-exploration that made me believe that I had meaningful stories to tell,” Ogbuagu said.

These workshop-based courses require students to read each other’s work and give extensive critiques in class discussions. “After all of that feedback, we’d go and make a revision that was very deep, very heavy,” said Ogbuagu. “You really get a very sharp sense as to the different ideas that different types of writers have for the directions you can go with a story. It really informed how I could take a certain experience and craft it in a way that I hadn't originally considered.”

In addition to writing, Ogbuagu serves as co-chair of the All Campus Events Committee of the Student Government Association and co-leads the Latin American Dance club. This fall, he will join LinkedIn’s Business Leadership Program for global sales in San Francisco. He plans to continue writing and eventually pursue a master’s degree in fine arts.  

Grace Lloyd ’16, a senior from Allentown, New Jersey, was awarded honorable mention for her story "Crush." She is an English and theatre major with a concentration in technology studies. She is currently writing a novella with the mentorship of Bakopoulos and plans to continue writing after graduation.

The Nick Adams Short Story Contest has been held annually since 1973 by the ACM. Winners receive $1,000, made possible by a gift from an anonymous donor.

Racialized State Violence and the Movement for Black Lives

In a free, public event, Damon Williams ’14 will present “Bigger Than the Cops: Racialized State Violence and the Movement for Black Lives” at 4 p.m. Thursday, April 28, in ARH Auditorium, Room 302.

After a brief presentation, Williams will join in a one-on-one conversation with Shanna Benjamin, associate professor of English. Alexandra Odom ’17 will introduce participants and set the stage for the discussion.

At 5 p.m., there will be a break for refreshments. Attendees will return at 5:15 p.m. for a workshop with Williams and Kesho Scott, associate professor of American studies and sociology.

Event sponsors include Alumni in the Classroom Program, Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Center for the Humanities, Peace and Conflict Studies, the Departments of Sociology, American Studies, and Economics, and the Rosenfield Program in Public Affairs, International Relations, and Human Rights.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. You can request accommodations through Conference Operations and Events.

About Damon Williams ’14

After a brief presentation, Williams will join in a one-on-one conversation with Shanna Benjamin, associate professor of English at Grinnell College. Senior Alexandra Odom will introduce participants and set the stage for the discussion.

At 5 p.m., there will be a break for refreshments. Attendees will return at 5:15 p.m. for a workshop with Williams and Kesho Scott, associate professor of American studies and sociology at Grinnell.

Williams is a community producer, organizer, radio host, hip-hop performance artist, actor, teacher and public speaker from the south side of Chicago. He has performed across the country with his sister, Kristiana Colón, as the poetic duo April Fools. He also co-hosts "AirGo Radio," a weekly show on WHPK, Chicago Community Radio.

In addition, Williams co-chairs the Chicago chapter of Black Youth Project 100, a national political organization comprised of black youth ages 18-35. He co-edits the #LetUsBreathe Collective, an artistic activist organization that serves underprivileged people and creatively disrupts the anti-black racist status quo.

Committed to addressing economic inequality, Williams also serves as the co-director of the Ujamaa Jr. Investment Club, which promotes financial literacy and investment strategies.

Sparking Interest in STEM

Faculty from the Department of Chemistry presented demonstrations and information as part of the nearby Tama County Family STEM Festival 2016, held on April 3. This outreach event used interactive activities to introduce children and parents to careers in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Grinnell College's representatives engaged the public with several demonstrations. 
 
Erick Leggans ’05, assistant professor of chemistry, demonstrated the density of invisible gasses by pouring carbon dioxide into a container with lit candles. The candles need oxygen in our air to keep burning. If the carbon dioxide is lighter than oxygen in the air, the candles will stay lit, but if the carbon dioxide is heavier than oxygen, it will sink to the space around the candles and they will go out. Observers could see for themselves what happened.
 
Blown-up balloons and liquid nitrogen, which is extremely cold, were used by Cori Ortiz, assistant professor of chemistry, to show how volume is related to temperature. This relationship is known as Charles' Law, named after the scientist who came up with the formula in the late 1700s. 
 
In the activities led by Elaine Marzluff, professor of chemistry, color was used as an indicator to test the pH of liquids. Being able to see a change in color is also helpful for knowing when chemical reactions change the acidity of liquids. Red cabbage was used as the indicator to test different liquids such as water and juice. In one experiment, dry ice was added to tap water to observe a change in pH. 
 
The demonstrations chosen by the chemistry faculty for this festival were intended to be accessible concepts for young minds and to get them thinking about science in everyday experiences. 
 

Golf Course Season Pass Rates

Grinnell College welcomes you to play at the Grinnell College Golf Course, a public golf course located at 933 13th Ave.

April Hours

Thursday–Sunday, from noon–6 p.m.

Daily rates only, cash or check.

Rates

Daily

  • 9 Holes - $15
  • 18 holes/unlimited - $25
  • Cart (9 holes) - $10
  • Cart (18 holes) - $15

Season Passes

Look for future announcements regarding summer hours and activities.