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Observatory Open House

A close-up view of the moon and Jupiter will be featured at an open house at 8:30 p.m. Friday, April 15, at Grant O. Gale Observatory on the north edge of the campus. 

Robert Cadmus, Breid-McFarland professor of science, professor of physics and director of the observatory, will lead the free, public observation. If the weather is cloudy, the program will consist of computer imaging demonstrations and recorded views through the telescope.

The Grant O. Gale Observatory is north of 10th Avenue and adjacent to Les Duke Track. 

To receive notification of future observatory open houses, contact Robert Cadmus, Grinnell College Department of Physics, at 641-269-3016 (office), 641-269-3014 (observatory) or by email.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. Individuals with mobility disabilities may park near the south end of the accessible path connecting the observatory to the drive on the north side of the Bear Recreation and Athletic Center. The observatory provides an Induction Hearing Loop System for persons with T-Coils in their hearing aids. In addition, the observatory has an audio and visual system that communicates between the first-floor classroom and the telescope for individuals who cannot climb the stairs to the telescope dome. Please contact Conference Operations and Events for other accommodations.

Writers@Grinnell: Rob Spillman

Award winning author, Rob Spillman, will read from his work and discuss writing on Monday, April 18 at 8:00 p.m. in ARH 302.

In addition, Spillman will lead a roundtable discussion which is free and open to the public, at 4:15 p.m. April 18 in JRC 209.

Rob Spillman is Editor and co-founder of Tin House, a sixteen-year-old bi-coastal (Brooklyn,Rob Spillman photo New York and Portland, Oregon) literary magazine. He is the 2015 recipient of the PEN/Nora Magid Award for Editing as well as the 2015 VIDO Award from VIDA. Tin House is the recipient of the 2015 Firecracker Award for General Excellence and has been honored in Best American Stories, Best American Essays, Best American Poetry, O’Henry Prize Stories, the Pushcart Prize Anthology and numerous other anthologies. He is also the Executive Editor of Tin House Books and co-founder of the Tin House Summer Workshop, now in its thirteenth year. His writing has appeared in BookForum, the Boston Review, Connoisseur, Details, GQ, Guernica, Nerve, the New York Times Book Review, Rolling Stone, Salon, Spin, Sports Illustrated, Time, Vanity Fair, Vogue, among other magazines, newspapers, and essay collections. He is also the editor of Gods and Soldiers: the Penguin Anthology of Contemporary African Writing, which was published in 2009. He is on the board of CLMP (the Community of Literary Magazines and Small Presses), the Brooklyn Book Festival Literary Council, Narrative4, and is the Chair of PEN’s Membership Committee. He has guest taught at universities around the world, including Queensland University in Brisbane, the Farafina Workshop in Lagos, Nigeria, the SLS Workshops in St. Petersburg, Russia and Nairobi, Kenya, the Catholic University of Santiago, Chile, the University of Florida, New York University, Brooklyn College, Amherst, Williams, and is currently a lecturer at Columbia University. His memoir, All Tomorrow’s Parties, will be published by Grove Press in April, 2016.

Celebrate the Earth During April - May 2016

Monday, April 11, 2016 - 4:00pm to Saturday, May 7, 2016 - 12:00pm

Grinnell College will host a series of events throughout April and early May in celebration of Earth Month. The free, public events will be focused on local food, creativity, volunteering and exploration.

Monday, April 11

Fred Magdoff
4:00 PM Roundtable - Noyce 1022
7:30 PM Public Talk - Joe Rosenfield ‘25 Center 101

Fred Magdoff, Professor Emeritus of Soils at the University of Vermont, will give a roundtable, Soil and Soil Health at 4:00pm in Noyce 1022; and a public talk, Capitalism and Agriculture, at 7:30pm in JRC 101.

Tuesday, April 12 and Thursday, April 14
Undergraduate Research Symposium
11:00 AM-1:00PM, Joe Rosenfield ‘25 Center, various locations

Undergraduate research panel and poster presentations include many student talks on local and global environmental and food justice topics. Arrive at 11:00am to grab a free lunch and full presentation schedule.   Panel presentations in JRC rooms: 202, 203, 209, 225-227. Poster/performance sessions in JRC 101.

Saturday, April 16           

Spring Fest
12:00-4:00 PM, Ecohouse

Join Ecohouse members for a celebration of spring, local foods, music, and community. Explore Ecohouse’s environmental projects and take part in seed planting. Enjoy live music from student performers, springtime crafting, and more!

Saturday, April 16                

National Water Dance
3:00 PM, Conard Environmental Research Area (CERA)

Join Grinnell College and community dancers and         musicians in celebrating the importance of water in our lives through music and dance.

RSVP to Jan Graham grahamj[at]grinnell[dot]edu. Van leaves JRC drop-off zone at 2:15pm, and Mayflower Community at 2:25pm. If driving on your own, meet at EEC at 2:50pm

Monday, April 18             

Site-Specific Studio Critique
1:00-4:00 PM, Conard Environmental Research Area (CERA)

Join Professor Lee Emma Running and her ART320 - Site Specific Studio students for the critique of their place-based art installations at CERA. Student art installations explore how we connect to the Iowa landscape.  RSVP to hilleliz[at]grinnell[dot]edu for transportation.

Tuesday, April 19

Fracture: Essays Poems, and Stories on Fracking in America
7:30 PM, Joe Rosenfield ‘25 Center 101

Join Taylor Brorby (ed.) and Iowa-based writers and thinkers - Debra Marquart, Carolyn Raffensperger, and Frederick Kirschenmann for a book reading and Q&A session on the impacts of hydraulic fracturing (fracking).

Wednesday, April 20                  

Richard Oppenlander
7:15 PM, ARH 302

Consultant and researcher Richard Oppenlander, author of “Food Choice and Sustainability” will guide the audience through a fact filled journey of the food choice-animal agriculture-environment connection, revealing why humanity is currently on a path of pseudo-sustainability.

Wednesday, April 20                

Ecohouse Movie Night
9:00 PM, Bob’s Underground Cafe

Join Ecohouse members to watch “The Secret Life of Plants,” a 1979 documentary based on the book of the same name. The film features time-lapse photography of plants and fungi growing and original score by musician Stevie Wonder.

Friday, April 22

20 Minutes @ 11: Culling the Herd
11:00 AM, Bucksbaum 131 - Faulconer Gallery

Explore our human relationship to white-tailed deer with Professor Lee Emma Running, who will present her recent project “Cure” in which she carves and gilds the bones of roadkill, and CERA Manager Elizabeth Hill, who will provide background on deer management in Iowa.

Saturday, April 23
The Power is Ours! Spiritual Reflections on Earth Day
12:30 PM, Grinnell United Church of Christ

Join UCC members in welcoming Grinnell College faculty Liz Queathem and David Campbell, together with Associate Chaplain and Rabbi Rob Cabelli, who explore spiritual connections to Earth Day and Climate Change.

Saturday, April 23

Eco Fair
11:00 AM-1:00 PM, Joe Rosenfield ‘25 Center, 1st floor and outdoor patio

SEC and Off-the-Grid students will present posters and demonstrations on topics pertaining to sustainable and off-the-grid living, including the tiny home movement,  water sanitation and heating, backcountry camping tips, permaculture, urban gardening, and composting toilets.

Sunday, April 24

Arbor Lake Cleanup
2:00 PM, Arbor Lake Park, 123 Pearl Street

Join IOWATER club in removing waste and beautifying Arbor Lake Park. Be prepared to get dirty, please wear rain boots and old clothes. RSVP to Iowater[at]grinnell[dot]edu. Meet at GORP room in Harris Center or at Arbor Lake Park

Tuesday, April 26

Woodland Wildflower Hike
4:15 - 6:15 PM, Conard Environmental Research Area (CERA)

Join CERA Manager Elizabeth Hill on a 1.5 mile spring ephemeral wildflower hike at CERA. Wear sturdy walking shoes. Hike starts 4:45pm at CERA. Van leaves from JRC drop-off zone at 4:15 P.M. RSVP to hilleliz[at]grinnell[dot]edu for transportation.

Thursday, April 28            

Ecofeminist Organizing Workshop
4:00-5:30 PM, ARH 102
Learn about inclusive organizing with two extraordinary activists! Join Bakken Resistance Pipeline Coalition co-founders and Women Food and Agriculture Network board members Ahna Kruzic and Dr. Angie Carter for a workshop on ecofeminist activism and organizing.

Friday, April 29                              

Food For Thought May Day Celebration
5:00-8:00 PM, Cleve Beach

Join members of Grinnell College’s Food For Thought group to celebrate early May Day. Bring a dish to the potluck and enjoy face-painting, music, and a discussion about campus food activism. Come and find out what Food For Thought is doing to increase the amount of “real food“ on campus!

Saturday, May 7

Tallgrass Audubon Bird Banding
8:00 AM-12:00 PM, Bob and Connie VanErsvelde’s house

Join members of the Tallgrass Audubon Society to learn about bird banding and the natural history of migratory birds. Families welcome! Van leaves from JRC drop-off zone. RSVP to hilleliz[at]grinnell[dot]edu for transportation or address

Sponsored by: Center for Prairie Studies, CERA, Environmental Studies, Faulconer Gallery, Peace and Conflict Studies, Food for Thought, Iowater, Student Environmental Committee, Ecohouse, Poweshiek County SWCD, Advancing Animal Compassion Together, Student Government Association.
 

Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity Symposium

The Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity Symposium will take place in the Joe Rosenfield ’25 Center and will feature the work of over 70 students.

Please come support the students as they present their papers, posters, readings, and performances.

Tuesday, April 12
11 a.m.-1 p.m., Poster Sessions and Panels, Rosenfield Center, various rooms
Wednesday, April 13
8 a.m.-4 p.m., Posters on display, Rosenfield Center, Room 101
Thursday, April 14
11 a.m.-1 p.m., Moderated panels, Rosenfield Center, various rooms

Detailed Symposium Schedule

April 11–14, 2016

Monday, April 11: Opening Reflections

7–9 p.m. Opening Reflections – Faulconer Gallery

Please join us as David Cook-Martin, Eliza Kempton, and Lee Running reflect on the value of research and creative work to their own scholarly pursuits, and then join us to view the Studio Art Faculty Exhibition and BAX: Bachelor of Arts Exhibition, a juried show featuring the work of third- and fourth-year students. These events will be followed by a dessert reception.

Tuesday, April 12: Poster Session and Moderated Panels

A light lunch is available in Rosenfield Center, Room 101

11 a.m.–1 p.m. Poster Session – Rosenfield Center, Room 101

  • Ana Karin Kozjek ’17
  • “Efficacies and Kinetics of Potential PET Ligand Agonists of α7 nAChR Differ”
  • Ian Dixon-Anderson ’17 and Thomas Robinson ’16
  • “Ionic Conductivities of Silyl and Carbonate Blend Electrolytes”
  • Michael Fitzpatrick ’16
  • “Morphological and Physiological Characterization of a Novel Subpopulation of Perisynaptic Schwann Cells”
  • Minna Montgomery ’16
  • “Synthetic Investigations Toward Biologically Active Derivatives of Polypeptide Macrolactones”
  • Nathan Kolacia ’16
  • “Synthesis and Characterization of Molybdenum(V) Imido Complexes with N-Salicylidene-2-Aminophenol”
  • Ryan Davis ’16
  • “Sex-Specific Antipredator Response to Auditory Cues in the Black Spiny- Tailed Iguana”
  • Helen Colliton ’16 and Maddy Pesch ’16
  • “Substituted Chalcones”
  • Peter Anderson ’16
  • “Police Use of Excessive Force Against People of Color in Baltimore”
  • Hannah Brown ’16
  • “Improving Clinical Trial Transparency”
  • Glorianne Dorce ’17
  • “Cuban Adjustment Act Reform”
  • Sophia Shin ’16
  • “Asian-American Mental Health Policy”
  • Sarina Farb ’16
  • “Setting Federal Nutrition Guidelines that Best Reflect Nutrition Science”
  • Jacob Ziontz ’16
  • “Effect of High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity on Spatial and Declarative Memory”
  • Maile Leathem-Rietz ’17
  • “CAFO in Poweshiek County, Iowa, Is a Reservoir for Carbenicillin Resistance Genes”
  • Caroline Graham ’16
  • “Marine Policy in the Arctic: Looking to the Future”
  • Deborah Msekela ’17
  • “Dissolved Organic Matter Sulfidization and Impact on HgS Bioavailability for Methylation”
  • Connor Mulligan ’17
  • “Organosilyl Electrolyte Conductivities, Lithium Transference Numbers, and Solvation Shells via PFG-STE NMR Diffusion Experiments and Their Application in Lithium-Ion Batteries”

11 a.m.–noon Studying Grinnell: Exploring Our Local Community – Rosenfield Center, Room 209

  • Sarah Henderson ’16
  • “Increasing Attendance at the Grinnell Historical Museum”
  • Samantha Snodgrass ’16
  • “Water and Landscape Management in Grinnell”
  • Summer Jones ’17
  • “Determining Students’ Postsecondary Plans: A Program Evaluation of the Tools Used by Grinnell High School’s Counseling Department”
  • Roselle Tenorio ’17
  • “Food Security Barriers for Rural Food Pantry Clients”

11 a.m.–noon Colonization and Hybridity – Rosenfield Center, Room 227

  • Aminata Kinana ’18 “Discourses on Mixity: How Identity and Difference Are Viewed in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania”
  • Willa Collins ’16 “Cult Classic: The Academy and Popular Religion in Colonial and Post-Renovation Vietnam”Sofia Mendez Subieta ’19 “Rethinking the Defeat of the Aztec Empire”
  • Rebecca Wong ’17 “Negotiating the Boundary Between Christianity and Filial Piety in Modern-Day Hong Kong”

11 a.m.–noon Culture, Confrontation, and Dislocations – Rosenfield Center, Room 226

  • Hening Zhang ’16
  • “A Search for Liberal Arts Studenthood in Modern China: Student Activism in Yenching University, 1918–1949”
  • Fangda Li ’16
  • “Through the Eyes of Shanghai Jewish Refugees: German, Austrian Jews in Shanghai”
  • Fenyi Wu ’17
  • “Red Amnesia: Responses to the Cultural Revolution in Contemporary Chinese Art”
  • Alyssa DeBella ’19
  • “Ritual Action and Social Spectacle: The Creation and Systematic Destruction of The Hunger Games”

11 a.m.–noon Interventions in Media Studies – Rosenfield Center, Room 225

  • Sophie Donlon ’16
  • “Confronting the Gaze: Reconfiguring Spectatorship in Untitled (Kitchen Table Series) by Carrie Mae Weems”
  • Lily Seibert ’19
  • “I Can’t Tell What’s Real Anymore: Paying the Price of Reality Television and Media”
  • Kai Vorhies ’19
  • “Capitol Whistleblowers: The Ethics of Mass Surveillance”
  • Meredith Carroll ’16
  • “The Marvelous and the Modern: Selling the Phonograph in Victorian London”

11 a.m.–noon Representations of Space and Time – Rosenfield Center, Room 202

  • Cameron Frank ’16
  • “Spatial Dependence in Newton-Cartan Gravity in Noninertial Reference Frames”
  • Jun Taek Lee ’18
  • “Randomness of Multifractal Systems”
  • Kaiqian Zhang ’17 and David Koychev ’16
  • “New Formulas from LU Matrix Decomposition”

Noon–1 p.m. Cognition, Meta-Cognition, and Knowledge – Rosenfield Center, Room 202

  • Lizzie Eason ’17
  • “Priming Epistem Stances”
  • Krista Matthews-Saugstad ’16
  • “Investigating Gestures”
  • Isabel Monaghan ’16
  • “Priming Epistem Stances”

Noon–1 p.m. Production, Consumption, and Capitalism: Across Time and Place – Rosenfield Center, Room 203

  • Rosemarie O’Brien ’16
  • “Chinese Art Today: Rural Aesthetics vs. Urban Commodities”
  • Jenny Samuels ’16
  • “Moral Capitalism and Democracy in the Third New Deal: Keynesian Fiscal Policy after the 1937–1938 Recession”
  • Mari Holmes ’17
  • “Analyzing the Multiplicity of Childhood and Who Gets Access”

Noon–1 p.m. Environmental Challenges and Responses – Rosenfield Center, Room 209

  • Jackson Dunnington ’16
  • “Cross-Temporal Analysis of Sociocultural Response to Drought in the American West”
  • Greg Margida ’16
  • “Racism of Climate Apathy”
  • Cassandra Miller ’16
  • “An Analysis of the 17th Karmapa as an Effective Environmentalist”

Wednesday, April 13 Posters on Display

8 a.m.–4 p.m. Posters on display – Rosenfield Center, Room 101

Thursday, April 14 Moderated Panels

A light lunch is available outside Rosenfield Center, Room 209

11 a.m.–noon Performances – Rosenfield Center, Room 101

  • Ivy Kuhn ’16
  • “The National Water Dance: Somatic and Site-Specific Dance-Making”
  • Alexandra Barnard ’17
  • “I Dream Before I Take the Stand”
  • Aaron Israel Levin ’17
  • “Brass Quintet”

11 a.m.–noon Women of Color Negotiating Agency and Representation – Rosenfield Center, Room 225

  • Alexandra Odom ’16
  • “Perceptions of Impact Among African American Women in the Civil Rights Movement”
  • Jocelyn Acosta ’16
  • “Race, Class, and Sex Work”
  • Jermaine Stewart-Webb ’16
  • “Discussing Black Female Sexuality with Private Letters: The Nellie McKay and Nell Irvin Painter Correspondence”

11 a.m.–noon Education and Pedagogy – Rosenfield Center, Room 226

  • Carlina Arango ’16
  • “An Evaluation of Al Exito’s Impact on Participants in the Program’s First Three Years (2006–09)”
  • Paulina Campbell ’16
  • “Pedagogy and Social Change”
  • Katherine Tucker ’16
  • “The Gendered Nature of Social Class: How Intersecting Identities Inform College Students’ Plans for Relationship and Family Formation”

11 a.m.–noon Explorations in the Digital Humanities – Rosenfield Center, Room 227

  • Emily Hackman ’16
  • “Civil War Memory and GIS”
  • Paige Wheeler ’16 and Julia Marquez-Uppman ’17
  • “Blood vs. Love: Power in Early Modern Spain”
  • Noah Schlager ’16
  • “Digital Amanas”

Noon–1 p.m. Novella Readings – Rosenfield Center, Room 101

  • Hannah Condon ’16 River Valley Natives
  • Emma Thomasch ’16 Where We Go From Here
  • Leo Abbe-Schneider ’16 French Rollins
  • Phoebe Mogharei ’16 Careless
  • Grace Lloyd ’16 Saccharine

Noon–1 p.m. Individuals and Nations – Rosenfield Center, Room 203

  • Lauren Yi ’18
  • “The Religion of Victimhood in North Korea: How Juche Ideology Shaped a New Nation”
  • Dhruv Gupta ’17
  • “Variables Underlying Trust in Nation-States”
  • Colleen Moser ’16
  • “West African Communities in France: Contemporary Challenges for Malian Village Associations and Transnational Development”

Noon–1 p.m. Surveying Sex at Grinnell College – Rosenfield Center, Room 209

  • Melissa Melloy ’16
  • “Love for One or Love for All: Polyamory at Grinnell College”
  • Mara Rosenberg ’17
  • “Queering High Street: Investigating Strategies for Same-Sex Hookups at Grinnell College”
  • Elaina Notman ’16
  • “Preference for Intoxication in Consensual Sexual Encounters”

Noon–1 p.m. Intimate Surfaces: Troubling the High/Low Divide – Rosenfield Center, Room 202

  • Eliza Harrison ’16
  • “Early Sonia Delaunay: The Avant-Garde at Home”
  • Lauren Roush ’16
  • “Fabric Portraits”
  • Mai Pham ’16
  • “Traces of Pop in Dinh Q. Lê’s Art”

Sponsored by the Office of the Dean of the College.

The dean’s office wishes to thank Vance Byrd, Jennifer Dobe, Andrew Graham, Jan Graham, Kelly Maynard, Casey Oberlin, Terri Phipps, Andi Tracy ’99, Tilly Woodward, and the Dining Services staff for their assistance in organizing this symposium.

If you require an accommodation in order to attend or fully participate in any of these events please contact Maria Tapias or the coordinator of disability resources, Autumn Wilke, or call 641-269-3702.

Fred Magdoff: Capitalism and Agriculture

On Monday, April 11, Fred Magdoff, emeritus professor of plant and soil science at the University of Vermont, will discuss capitalism, agriculture, soil, and soil health in two event.

He will give a talk, “Capitalism and Agriculture” at 7:30 p.m. in Joe Rosenfield '25 Center, Room 101. Before the talk, Magdoff will lead a roundtable discussion about “Soil and Soil Health” at 4 p.m. in Noyce Science Center, Room 1022.

Grinnell College's Center for Prairie Studies is sponsoring the events, which are free and open to the public.

“When a leading soil scientist and a leading political activist are the same person, the results are bound to be interesting,” said Jon Andelson, Rosenfield professor of social science-anthropology and director of the Center for Prairie Studies. “Professor Magdoff will subject the capitalist context of American and world agriculture to critical scrutiny, as he has in much of his published work. If you believe capitalism is the best economic system for agriculture, come and hear an argument to the contrary.”

Numerous social and ecological problems arise from the way that agriculture functions within capitalist economies, according to Magdoff. These include hunger in the midst of plenty, lack of nutrient cycling, poor rotations, inhumane raising of animals on factory farms, poor treatment of farm and slaughterhouse labor, and environmental pollution with pesticides and fertilizers.

He asserts that these problems are outcomes of a system in which the overriding goal and motivating force is profit. In such a system, decisions that makes sense from the narrow economic standpoint, are frequently ecologically and socially irrational.

Magdoff's interests range from soil science to agriculture and food (science, production, economics, policy) to the environment to the U.S. economy. His science research has expored ways to improve soil fertility, especially focusing on the critical role of soil organic matter. He oriented his agricultural outreach activities to explaining the application of ecological principles to food production.

He is co-author of Building Crops for Better Soil: Sustainable Soil Management and What Every Environmentalist Needs to Know About Capitalism. He is co-editor of Agriculture and Food in Crisis: Conflict, Resistance and Renewal. His forthcoming book, Creating an Ecological Society, is due out later this year.

Mortal Tongues, Immortal Stories

Dakshina/Daniel Phoenix Singh Dance Company will present Mortal Tongues, Immortal Stories is a multimedia dance project that bears witness and celebrates the lives of poets and artists lost to AIDS. Based on the anthology "Persistent Voices: Poetry by Writers Lost to AIDS", this evening-length performance brings together spoken word, artists, dancers, and stunning visual designs in short vignettes that create an imaginary world inspired by the poems.

The performance begins at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 9, 2016, in Flanagan Theatre, Bucksbaum Center for the Arts. Tickets are required for this free event and are available at the Campus Box Office begin April 4.

The day before their performance, three members of Dakshina — Chris August, Daniel Phoenix Singh, and Gowri Koneswaran — will speak on the interdisciplinary nature of Dakshina’s work and how art can address social issues within the context of their upcoming performance of Mortal Tongues, Immortal Stories. The entire company of 11 will be present to contribute to the discussion and answer questions.

The event begins at noon, Friday, April 8, in Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, Room 152, and lunch provided.

Grinnell College's Artists@GrinnellDepartment of Theatre & Dance, Center for International Studies, and Center for Humanities are sponsoring the free, public events.

About Dakshina/Daniel Phoenix Singh Dance Company

Dakshina/Daniel Phoenix Singh Dance Company is an emerging dance company based in Washington D.C. They perform and present Indian dance forms, such as Bharata Natyam, and modern dance, mirroring the multiple identities of second generation South Asians. The group combines the arts with social justice issues by incorporating the themes into their work and partnering with local community centers and schools.

With Photosphere, You are (Almost) There

Have cellphone, will travel: that’s the mantra in today’s device-driven world. Now, with a smartphone camera and a special app, a new project is providing virtual tours of archaeological sites in northern Arizona.

The Kaibab National Forest’s website now displays amazing 360-degree views of actual pueblos and rock art sites, old cabins and fire lookouts, and historic railroads, trails, and roads.

Using Google Camera on a phone, archaeologist Neil Weintraub [’86] snaps a picture at a site — or actually 41 images stitched together, to form a collage called a “photosphere.” On screen, users can rotate the view and gain a sense of the entire surrounding landscape. When that image is downloaded into the Tiny Planets app, a compressed and more artistic rendering can be created.

Neil feels this technique will provide an unusual perception on archaeological and historical sites.  It provides for him additional clues as to why people built pueblos where they did many years ago.  Also the near three-dimensional pictures show how significant the sky and landscape was to people who resided in the region many years ago.

While it is not the same as being there in person, Weintraub is confident that this method will provide people a preview, so that when or if they do visit it in person, they will see it from a new perspective.

Originally appeared in KNAU Earth Notes. Republished with permission.