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Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity Symposium

The Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity Symposium will take place in the Joe Rosenfield ’25 Center and will feature the work of over 70 students.

Please come support the students as they present their papers, posters, readings, and performances.

Tuesday, April 12
11 a.m.-1 p.m., Poster Sessions and Panels, Rosenfield Center, various rooms
Wednesday, April 13
8 a.m.-4 p.m., Posters on display, Rosenfield Center, Room 101
Thursday, April 14
11 a.m.-1 p.m., Moderated panels, Rosenfield Center, various rooms

Detailed Symposium Schedule

April 11–14, 2016

Monday, April 11: Opening Reflections

7–9 p.m. Opening Reflections – Faulconer Gallery

Please join us as David Cook-Martin, Eliza Kempton, and Lee Running reflect on the value of research and creative work to their own scholarly pursuits, and then join us to view the Studio Art Faculty Exhibition and BAX: Bachelor of Arts Exhibition, a juried show featuring the work of third- and fourth-year students. These events will be followed by a dessert reception.

Tuesday, April 12: Poster Session and Moderated Panels

A light lunch is available in Rosenfield Center, Room 101

11 a.m.–1 p.m. Poster Session – Rosenfield Center, Room 101

  • Ana Karin Kozjek ’17
  • “Efficacies and Kinetics of Potential PET Ligand Agonists of α7 nAChR Differ”
  • Ian Dixon-Anderson ’17 and Thomas Robinson ’16
  • “Ionic Conductivities of Silyl and Carbonate Blend Electrolytes”
  • Michael Fitzpatrick ’16
  • “Morphological and Physiological Characterization of a Novel Subpopulation of Perisynaptic Schwann Cells”
  • Minna Montgomery ’16
  • “Synthetic Investigations Toward Biologically Active Derivatives of Polypeptide Macrolactones”
  • Nathan Kolacia ’16
  • “Synthesis and Characterization of Molybdenum(V) Imido Complexes with N-Salicylidene-2-Aminophenol”
  • Ryan Davis ’16
  • “Sex-Specific Antipredator Response to Auditory Cues in the Black Spiny- Tailed Iguana”
  • Helen Colliton ’16 and Maddy Pesch ’16
  • “Substituted Chalcones”
  • Peter Anderson ’16
  • “Police Use of Excessive Force Against People of Color in Baltimore”
  • Hannah Brown ’16
  • “Improving Clinical Trial Transparency”
  • Glorianne Dorce ’17
  • “Cuban Adjustment Act Reform”
  • Sophia Shin ’16
  • “Asian-American Mental Health Policy”
  • Sarina Farb ’16
  • “Setting Federal Nutrition Guidelines that Best Reflect Nutrition Science”
  • Jacob Ziontz ’16
  • “Effect of High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity on Spatial and Declarative Memory”
  • Maile Leathem-Rietz ’17
  • “CAFO in Poweshiek County, Iowa, Is a Reservoir for Carbenicillin Resistance Genes”
  • Caroline Graham ’16
  • “Marine Policy in the Arctic: Looking to the Future”
  • Deborah Msekela ’17
  • “Dissolved Organic Matter Sulfidization and Impact on HgS Bioavailability for Methylation”
  • Connor Mulligan ’17
  • “Organosilyl Electrolyte Conductivities, Lithium Transference Numbers, and Solvation Shells via PFG-STE NMR Diffusion Experiments and Their Application in Lithium-Ion Batteries”

11 a.m.–noon Studying Grinnell: Exploring Our Local Community – Rosenfield Center, Room 209

  • Sarah Henderson ’16
  • “Increasing Attendance at the Grinnell Historical Museum”
  • Samantha Snodgrass ’16
  • “Water and Landscape Management in Grinnell”
  • Summer Jones ’17
  • “Determining Students’ Postsecondary Plans: A Program Evaluation of the Tools Used by Grinnell High School’s Counseling Department”
  • Roselle Tenorio ’17
  • “Food Security Barriers for Rural Food Pantry Clients”

11 a.m.–noon Colonization and Hybridity – Rosenfield Center, Room 227

  • Aminata Kinana ’18 “Discourses on Mixity: How Identity and Difference Are Viewed in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania”
  • Willa Collins ’16 “Cult Classic: The Academy and Popular Religion in Colonial and Post-Renovation Vietnam”Sofia Mendez Subieta ’19 “Rethinking the Defeat of the Aztec Empire”
  • Rebecca Wong ’17 “Negotiating the Boundary Between Christianity and Filial Piety in Modern-Day Hong Kong”

11 a.m.–noon Culture, Confrontation, and Dislocations – Rosenfield Center, Room 226

  • Hening Zhang ’16
  • “A Search for Liberal Arts Studenthood in Modern China: Student Activism in Yenching University, 1918–1949”
  • Fangda Li ’16
  • “Through the Eyes of Shanghai Jewish Refugees: German, Austrian Jews in Shanghai”
  • Fenyi Wu ’17
  • “Red Amnesia: Responses to the Cultural Revolution in Contemporary Chinese Art”
  • Alyssa DeBella ’19
  • “Ritual Action and Social Spectacle: The Creation and Systematic Destruction of The Hunger Games”

11 a.m.–noon Interventions in Media Studies – Rosenfield Center, Room 225

  • Sophie Donlon ’16
  • “Confronting the Gaze: Reconfiguring Spectatorship in Untitled (Kitchen Table Series) by Carrie Mae Weems”
  • Lily Seibert ’19
  • “I Can’t Tell What’s Real Anymore: Paying the Price of Reality Television and Media”
  • Kai Vorhies ’19
  • “Capitol Whistleblowers: The Ethics of Mass Surveillance”
  • Meredith Carroll ’16
  • “The Marvelous and the Modern: Selling the Phonograph in Victorian London”

11 a.m.–noon Representations of Space and Time – Rosenfield Center, Room 202

  • Cameron Frank ’16
  • “Spatial Dependence in Newton-Cartan Gravity in Noninertial Reference Frames”
  • Jun Taek Lee ’18
  • “Randomness of Multifractal Systems”
  • Kaiqian Zhang ’17 and David Koychev ’16
  • “New Formulas from LU Matrix Decomposition”

Noon–1 p.m. Cognition, Meta-Cognition, and Knowledge – Rosenfield Center, Room 202

  • Lizzie Eason ’17
  • “Priming Epistem Stances”
  • Krista Matthews-Saugstad ’16
  • “Investigating Gestures”
  • Isabel Monaghan ’16
  • “Priming Epistem Stances”

Noon–1 p.m. Production, Consumption, and Capitalism: Across Time and Place – Rosenfield Center, Room 203

  • Rosemarie O’Brien ’16
  • “Chinese Art Today: Rural Aesthetics vs. Urban Commodities”
  • Jenny Samuels ’16
  • “Moral Capitalism and Democracy in the Third New Deal: Keynesian Fiscal Policy after the 1937–1938 Recession”
  • Mari Holmes ’17
  • “Analyzing the Multiplicity of Childhood and Who Gets Access”

Noon–1 p.m. Environmental Challenges and Responses – Rosenfield Center, Room 209

  • Jackson Dunnington ’16
  • “Cross-Temporal Analysis of Sociocultural Response to Drought in the American West”
  • Greg Margida ’16
  • “Racism of Climate Apathy”
  • Cassandra Miller ’16
  • “An Analysis of the 17th Karmapa as an Effective Environmentalist”

Wednesday, April 13 Posters on Display

8 a.m.–4 p.m. Posters on display – Rosenfield Center, Room 101

Thursday, April 14 Moderated Panels

A light lunch is available outside Rosenfield Center, Room 209

11 a.m.–noon Performances – Rosenfield Center, Room 101

  • Ivy Kuhn ’16
  • “The National Water Dance: Somatic and Site-Specific Dance-Making”
  • Alexandra Barnard ’17
  • “I Dream Before I Take the Stand”
  • Aaron Israel Levin ’17
  • “Brass Quintet”

11 a.m.–noon Women of Color Negotiating Agency and Representation – Rosenfield Center, Room 225

  • Alexandra Odom ’16
  • “Perceptions of Impact Among African American Women in the Civil Rights Movement”
  • Jocelyn Acosta ’16
  • “Race, Class, and Sex Work”
  • Jermaine Stewart-Webb ’16
  • “Discussing Black Female Sexuality with Private Letters: The Nellie McKay and Nell Irvin Painter Correspondence”

11 a.m.–noon Education and Pedagogy – Rosenfield Center, Room 226

  • Carlina Arango ’16
  • “An Evaluation of Al Exito’s Impact on Participants in the Program’s First Three Years (2006–09)”
  • Paulina Campbell ’16
  • “Pedagogy and Social Change”
  • Katherine Tucker ’16
  • “The Gendered Nature of Social Class: How Intersecting Identities Inform College Students’ Plans for Relationship and Family Formation”

11 a.m.–noon Explorations in the Digital Humanities – Rosenfield Center, Room 227

  • Emily Hackman ’16
  • “Civil War Memory and GIS”
  • Paige Wheeler ’16 and Julia Marquez-Uppman ’17
  • “Blood vs. Love: Power in Early Modern Spain”
  • Noah Schlager ’16
  • “Digital Amanas”

Noon–1 p.m. Novella Readings – Rosenfield Center, Room 101

  • Hannah Condon ’16 River Valley Natives
  • Emma Thomasch ’16 Where We Go From Here
  • Leo Abbe-Schneider ’16 French Rollins
  • Phoebe Mogharei ’16 Careless
  • Grace Lloyd ’16 Saccharine

Noon–1 p.m. Individuals and Nations – Rosenfield Center, Room 203

  • Lauren Yi ’18
  • “The Religion of Victimhood in North Korea: How Juche Ideology Shaped a New Nation”
  • Dhruv Gupta ’17
  • “Variables Underlying Trust in Nation-States”
  • Colleen Moser ’16
  • “West African Communities in France: Contemporary Challenges for Malian Village Associations and Transnational Development”

Noon–1 p.m. Surveying Sex at Grinnell College – Rosenfield Center, Room 209

  • Melissa Melloy ’16
  • “Love for One or Love for All: Polyamory at Grinnell College”
  • Mara Rosenberg ’17
  • “Queering High Street: Investigating Strategies for Same-Sex Hookups at Grinnell College”
  • Elaina Notman ’16
  • “Preference for Intoxication in Consensual Sexual Encounters”

Noon–1 p.m. Intimate Surfaces: Troubling the High/Low Divide – Rosenfield Center, Room 202

  • Eliza Harrison ’16
  • “Early Sonia Delaunay: The Avant-Garde at Home”
  • Lauren Roush ’16
  • “Fabric Portraits”
  • Mai Pham ’16
  • “Traces of Pop in Dinh Q. Lê’s Art”

Sponsored by the Office of the Dean of the College.

The dean’s office wishes to thank Vance Byrd, Jennifer Dobe, Andrew Graham, Jan Graham, Kelly Maynard, Casey Oberlin, Terri Phipps, Andi Tracy ’99, Tilly Woodward, and the Dining Services staff for their assistance in organizing this symposium.

If you require an accommodation in order to attend or fully participate in any of these events please contact Maria Tapias or the coordinator of disability resources, Autumn Wilke, or call 641-269-3702.

Fred Magdoff: Capitalism and Agriculture

On Monday, April 11, Fred Magdoff, emeritus professor of plant and soil science at the University of Vermont, will discuss capitalism, agriculture, soil, and soil health in two event.

He will give a talk, “Capitalism and Agriculture” at 7:30 p.m. in Joe Rosenfield '25 Center, Room 101. Before the talk, Magdoff will lead a roundtable discussion about “Soil and Soil Health” at 4 p.m. in Noyce Science Center, Room 1022.

Grinnell College's Center for Prairie Studies is sponsoring the events, which are free and open to the public.

“When a leading soil scientist and a leading political activist are the same person, the results are bound to be interesting,” said Jon Andelson, Rosenfield professor of social science-anthropology and director of the Center for Prairie Studies. “Professor Magdoff will subject the capitalist context of American and world agriculture to critical scrutiny, as he has in much of his published work. If you believe capitalism is the best economic system for agriculture, come and hear an argument to the contrary.”

Numerous social and ecological problems arise from the way that agriculture functions within capitalist economies, according to Magdoff. These include hunger in the midst of plenty, lack of nutrient cycling, poor rotations, inhumane raising of animals on factory farms, poor treatment of farm and slaughterhouse labor, and environmental pollution with pesticides and fertilizers.

He asserts that these problems are outcomes of a system in which the overriding goal and motivating force is profit. In such a system, decisions that makes sense from the narrow economic standpoint, are frequently ecologically and socially irrational.

Magdoff's interests range from soil science to agriculture and food (science, production, economics, policy) to the environment to the U.S. economy. His science research has expored ways to improve soil fertility, especially focusing on the critical role of soil organic matter. He oriented his agricultural outreach activities to explaining the application of ecological principles to food production.

He is co-author of Building Crops for Better Soil: Sustainable Soil Management and What Every Environmentalist Needs to Know About Capitalism. He is co-editor of Agriculture and Food in Crisis: Conflict, Resistance and Renewal. His forthcoming book, Creating an Ecological Society, is due out later this year.

Mortal Tongues, Immortal Stories

Dakshina/Daniel Phoenix Singh Dance Company will present Mortal Tongues, Immortal Stories is a multimedia dance project that bears witness and celebrates the lives of poets and artists lost to AIDS. Based on the anthology "Persistent Voices: Poetry by Writers Lost to AIDS", this evening-length performance brings together spoken word, artists, dancers, and stunning visual designs in short vignettes that create an imaginary world inspired by the poems.

The performance begins at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 9, 2016, in Flanagan Theatre, Bucksbaum Center for the Arts. Tickets are required for this free event and are available at the Campus Box Office begin April 4.

The day before their performance, three members of Dakshina — Chris August, Daniel Phoenix Singh, and Gowri Koneswaran — will speak on the interdisciplinary nature of Dakshina’s work and how art can address social issues within the context of their upcoming performance of Mortal Tongues, Immortal Stories. The entire company of 11 will be present to contribute to the discussion and answer questions.

The event begins at noon, Friday, April 8, in Bucksbaum Center for the Arts, Room 152, and lunch provided.

Grinnell College's Artists@GrinnellDepartment of Theatre & Dance, Center for International Studies, and Center for Humanities are sponsoring the free, public events.

About Dakshina/Daniel Phoenix Singh Dance Company

Dakshina/Daniel Phoenix Singh Dance Company is an emerging dance company based in Washington D.C. They perform and present Indian dance forms, such as Bharata Natyam, and modern dance, mirroring the multiple identities of second generation South Asians. The group combines the arts with social justice issues by incorporating the themes into their work and partnering with local community centers and schools.

With Photosphere, You are (Almost) There

Have cellphone, will travel: that’s the mantra in today’s device-driven world. Now, with a smartphone camera and a special app, a new project is providing virtual tours of archaeological sites in northern Arizona.

The Kaibab National Forest’s website now displays amazing 360-degree views of actual pueblos and rock art sites, old cabins and fire lookouts, and historic railroads, trails, and roads.

Using Google Camera on a phone, archaeologist Neil Weintraub [’86] snaps a picture at a site — or actually 41 images stitched together, to form a collage called a “photosphere.” On screen, users can rotate the view and gain a sense of the entire surrounding landscape. When that image is downloaded into the Tiny Planets app, a compressed and more artistic rendering can be created.

Neil feels this technique will provide an unusual perception on archaeological and historical sites.  It provides for him additional clues as to why people built pueblos where they did many years ago.  Also the near three-dimensional pictures show how significant the sky and landscape was to people who resided in the region many years ago.

While it is not the same as being there in person, Weintraub is confident that this method will provide people a preview, so that when or if they do visit it in person, they will see it from a new perspective.

Originally appeared in KNAU Earth Notes. Republished with permission.

The National Water Dance Comes to Grinnell

Ivy Kuhn ’16 and an ensemble will perform a dance as part of the National Water Dance project at 3 p.m. on Saturday, April 16. Kuhn organized the event and choreographed the community-dance project as part of a Mentored Advanced Project with Celeste Miller, assistant professor of theatre and dance.

Kuhn's performance, which will feature the Tai Chi Women's Group, Grinnell Community Ensemble, and Pioneer String Quartet, will take place at the College's Conard Environmental Research Area (CERA). Sponsored by the Center for Prairie Studies, it is free and open to the public.

The performance at CERA is one of more than 100 National Water Dance sites around the nation that will join together April 16 for a simultaneous event to bring awareness to the pressing issues of water. This event will be live-streamed on the National Water Dance website

National Water Dance is an organization that creates opportunities for dancers of all ages to experience the power of art and performance as a vehicle for social change by collaborating on the formation of a nationwide movement choir.

“Water is so obviously precious to human life — and to all life — that we shouldn’t need a dance to make us realize it. But this dance is taking place at locations all around the country on the same day and at the same time as a statement that we need to achieve an even more profound realization,” said Jon Andelson ’70, Rosenfield professor of science – anthropology and director of the Center for Prairie Studies. 

Each site of the National Water Dance project features a dance that is specifically choreographed to reflect a local water issue.

“I centered my choreography,” Kuhn said, “on the sensory elements of the prairie playing with the imagery of the extensive roots, gravity and sinking, the exchange between breath and contact, in contrast to the internal and external sense of water's fluidity and ability to flood and alter when there is nothing holding it in place.”

Audience participation will be invited at the April 16 event at CERA. “If you can move,” Andelson said, “you can participate in this dance.”

Those interested in participating in the dance are encouraged to attend one of the following workshops, which are open to all ages with no dance experience required:

  • Saturday, April 9, 10:30-11:30 a.m., North Room of the Grinnell Arts Center, 926 Broad St.
  • Saturday, April 9, 1-2 p.m., Caulkins Community Room at the Drake Community Library, 930 Park St.
  • Sunday, April 10, 3:30-4:30 p.m., room 209 of Grinnell College's Joe Rosenfield '25 Center, 1115 Eighth Ave.
  • Tuesday, April 12, 2-3 p.m., Carmen Center, Mayflower Community, 616 Broad St.

Free, round-trip bus transportation to CERA on April 16 will be provided at 2:15 p.m. at the Rosenfield Center. Reservations can be made by contacting Jan Graham, 641-269-4384, by noon, Tuesday, April 13.

To drive to CERA, take Interstate-80 west from Grinnell to Exit 173. Go north on Highway 224 and turn right on the first gravel road (South 12th Avenue East), following it east about 1.5 miles to the main entrance of CERA.

Exploring Radical Politics in Jerusalem

Michael TeutschA free, public screening of "Café Ta´amon," light buffet dinner, and talk by the documentary's director, Michael Teutsch, will start at 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 6, in Joe Rosenfield '25 Center, Room 101. No reservations are needed.

The Ta´amon on King George Street is one of the oldest cafes in Jerusalem and it is world famous. Golda Meir, the fourth prime minister of Israel, drank coffee there, and so did Noble Peace Prize-winner Shimon Peres, former prime minister and president of Israel.

The cafe has been a meeting place for radical Leftist-political-activists, artists, politicians, and the literati. Israel and its political development have been fervidly debated here — in the past as well as today. The cafe, established in 1936, is history in a microcosm.

A Jewish family took the cafe over again in the 1960s. Together with Hamis, a Muslim, they cater to their guests day after day. The director precisely documents their everyday life. He shows the bistro, its owners, and customers. He moves away from them to investigate stories and comes back again — to Ta'amon and its record of contemporary history.

Movie poster for Cafe Ta'amon"This film takes us through the living history of a movement, the movement for peace and social justice," said K. Gibel Mevorach, professor of anthropology and American studies and Chair of the Cultural Films Committee: "It leaves us with the questions: 'What do activists do when the movement stalls, bogs down, or begins to fade away?' and 'What is revolutionary and transformative?'

"These are urgent questions for our times, not just there but here and everywhere," Gibel Mevorach added. "The path toward the fullest expression of rights and realization of potential for all human beings is fraught with challenges, full of unexpected successes and devastating or exhausting failures."

The Cultural Films Committee is sponsoring the event in conjunction with the Department of German.

Grinnell welcomes and encourages the participation of people with disabilities. Rosenfield Center has accessible parking in the lot to the east. Room 101 is equipped with an induction hearing loop system.  You can request accommodations from Conference Operations and Events.

The National Water Dance Comes to Grinnell

Saturday, April 16, 2016 - 3:00pm to 3:30pm
CERA

Featuring live music from the Pioneer String Quartet, dance performance by Ivy Kuhn and Ensemble, Tai Chi Women's Group, and the Grinnell Community Ensemble.

Over 100 sites in 35 states are coming together to bring attention to the pressing issues of water in the United States through embodied action! Come celebrate and bring awareness to the importance of water in our lives!

Bus transportation leaving from the JRC at 2:15 p.m. Please reserve a spot by emailing Jan Graham by noon, Tuesday, April 13th.

Come Dance With Us! Seeking dancers of all ages!

Saturday, April 9, 2016 - 10:30am to Tuesday, April 12, 2016 - 3:00pm
The National Water Dance Comes to Grinnell!

Seeking dancers of all ages! No previous dance experience necessary!

Come learn a simple dance phrase to be performed as part of the National Water Dance at CERA on Saturday, April 16th at 3:00 p.m.

This is a unique opportunity to bring attention to the pressing water issues in the United States through embodied action! Over 100 sites in the United States are participating now!

To join please attend one of the following workshops:

Saturday, April 9th 10:30-11:30 a.m. at Grinnell Area Arts, North Room

Saturday, April 9th 1:00-2:00 p.m. at the Drake Community Library, Caulkins Community Room

Sunday, April 10th 3:30-4:30 p.m. at Grinnell College, JRC 209

Tuesday, April 12th 2:00-3:00 p.m. at the Mayflower Carmen Center

Performance: Saturday, April 16th 3:00-3:30 p.m. at CERA

Please contact Ivy Kuhn, organizer and choreographer for more information: kuhnivy[at]grinnell[dot]edu
 

Student and Faculty Exhibitions at Faulconer Gallery

Student and faculty exhibitions at Faulconer Gallery open with a combined reception at 4 p.m. Friday, April 8.

The student BAX Exhibition will be on view through May 1, while the Studio Faculty Exhibition will continue through June 19.

Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week, and admission is free. The gallery will be closed for Memorial Day on May 30.

Bachelor of Arts Exhibition (BAX)

Caelum Froikin and Ezra Edgerton "Flipbook No. 1"

An electric flipbook created by seniors Caelum Froikin and Ezra Edgerton "Flipbook No. 1," 2016 Archival digital print, wood, power drill.

The Bachelor of Arts Exhibition features works in the creative arts by students at Grinnell College.

BAX is an exhibition of works by advanced third- and fourth-year art students. This year, the exhibition will feature works by 22 students in a variety of media including painting, photography, print, drawing, sculptures, textiles, interactive art, performance art, and installations.

Student-selected juror Jane Gilmor, professor emerita of art at Mount Mercy University in Cedar Rapids, will present awards at 4:15 p.m. during the opening reception. Gilmor is a nationally recognized artist from Iowa with work in the Faulconer Gallery, Grinnell College Art Collection.  Her project, “(Un)Seen Work,” was featured in the Faulconer Gallery exhibition “Culturing Community” in 2010.

Students on the art department's student educational policy committee organize the exhibition with support from the Faulconer staff. They manage all the exhibition details from the submission of proposals, to the selection of a juror, to the installation and awarding of prizes.

This year's organizers are  Hannah Condon ’16, Hannah Kelley’16, and Lauren Roush ’16.  

Studio Faculty Exhibition also opens April 8

BAX will be shown in conjunction with the Studio Faculty Exhibition, which will feature work by professors in the art department:

  • Jeremy Chen
  • Mary Coats
  • Andrew Kaufman
  • Matthew Kluber
  • Evan McLaughlin
  • Andrew Orloski
  • Lee Emma Running
  • Jill Davis Schrift

20 Minutes@11

The Studio Faculty Exhibition will feature six 20-minute talks by Grinnell faculty and staff starting at 11 a.m. in Faulconer Gallery.

Tuesday, April 19 — "Death and Drifting: Conversations Between a Poet and an Artist."
Hai-Dang Phan, assistant professor of English, and Jeremy Chen, assistant professor of art, will converse about poetry and art.
Wednesday, April 20 — "Friday I'm in Love."
Matthew Kluber, associate professor art, will investigate the intersection of painting and digital technology.
Friday, April 22 — "Culling the Herd."
Elizabeth Hill, Conard Environmental Research Area manager, and Lee Emma Running, associate professor of art, will discuss our relationship to the wild herd of whitetail deer in Iowa.
Tuesday, April 26 — "Rube Goldberg: Vintage Wine and Marathon Training."
Andrew Orloski, art technical assistant, will explore how complex, deeply philosophical notions can be found in simple, everyday objects and actions.
Tuesday, May 3 — "Series in Progress."
Andrew Kaufman, associate professor of art, will discuss the motivations and processes of his new series of artworks, which are based on forms of fracture.
Friday, May 6 — "Sunday Morning."
Evan McLaughlin, lecturer in art, will discuss how being raised in a religious household during the rise of video game culture inspired his fascination with creativity.