Programs

For the most up-to-date information about Grinnell College’s COVID-19 response, please visit the COVID-19 webpage.

As we create online options for programming, we will post that information here.

Workshops

Available to all students no matter their location.

A 30-minute weekly workshop designed to provide students with an opportunity to practice mindfulness in a semi-structured setting. Experience is not required. Each session will provide participants with exercises to help deepen their mindful awareness. This is a drop-in workshop so come and go as you please.

Thursdays: 11:30–Noon CT 

Zoom Links

Self-compassion is defined by, Dr. Kristin Neff as: “treating yourself the way you would treat a friend who is having hard time, self-compassion is a practice in which we learn to be a good friend to ourselves when we need it most — to become an inner ally rather than an inner enemy.” The three elements of self-compassion are self-kindness, common humanity and mindfulness.

This workshop is designed for students struggling with feelings of imperfections, experiencing self-critical thinking and struggling with the personal self. This work will help participants with acceptance, self-love, and processing our emotions. The workshop will cover themes of self-kindness, common humanity and mindfulness techniques. This workshop is open to any students living anywhere in the United States, both living on- and off-campus. This is an open workshop, meaning you can choose to jump in any session that works for your schedule, meaning there’s no commitment! Join your fellow peers as we learn together and gain access to coping skills of self-compassion, now more than ever we need to be kinder, more compassionate, love ourselves and others; and that is premise of the self-compassion workshop!

When: Thursdays at 12 noon, CT, starting Feb. 25, 2021
Where: See the schedule below for workshop topics and times/dates for each week
Who: Available to students anywhere at any location.
Facilitator: Hodan Farah, staff counselor, SHAW (641-269-3230)

How do I register for the workshop?

This is an open workshop group, meaning you can come to any of the session at any time as your schedule allows. Due to limitations the group is designed for only 10 participants at time. Join the workshop by clicking on the link below. The meeting will be closed when there are 10 students or 5 minutes past the hour, whichever happens first.

Rules of Engagement of the Workshop

  • Agree to attend and stay the entire session and be on time.
  • Agree that you are not currently having thoughts of harming yourself or others (or if you are, agreement to share and pursue safety plans to prevent harm.
  • If you are unable to attend the workshop/group scheduled, please contact the facilitator at least 2 hours prior to the start of group. That way the workshop might not take place depending on size capacity.
  • Turn off cellphones.
  • Refrain from giving advice to other participants of workshop.
  • Be respectful and courteous to other participants of the workshop.
  • Camera must be on for each individual participant for greater connection!

Dates and Zoom Links

Workshop Summary

This workshop teaches skills for managing strong emotions and impulses that interfere with our lives and relationships. The workshop uses principles of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). DBT has been demonstrated to be effective in helping individuals across populations facing a variety of challenges. DBT skills center dialectics, or the balance between opposites, and behavior as the catalyst for change. The skills taught in DBT are for anyone interested in improving their relationship to their emotions and managing conflict better.

Facilitator: Teague Craig, Staff Counselor
When: Wednesdays 1–2 p.m. CT, through March 31, 2021; Wednesdays Noon–1 p.m. CT Starting April 7, 2021
Where: See schedule below for each week’s link.
Who: Students in any location


Workshop Description

This workshop teaches skills for managing strong emotions and impulses that interfere with our lives and relationships. The workshop uses principles of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), which was originally developed in the 1990s to help individuals dealing with significant emotional and relational instability. DBT has since been demonstrated to be effective in helping individuals across populations facing a variety of challenges. DBT skills center dialectics, or the balance between opposites, and behavior as the catalyst for change. Ultimately, the skills taught in DBT are for anyone interested in improving their relationship to their emotions and managing conflict better.

What are DBT skills and what should I expect?

DBT is comprised of four skills-based modules: distress tolerance, mindfulness, emotion regulation, and interpersonal effectiveness. In this workshop, we focus on skills in one module each week and present different skills each time we rotate through a module, such as self-soothing for distress tolerance, or assertive communication for interpersonal effectiveness.

Workshop norms and expectations will be reviewed briefly at the start of every session and include the following:

  • Honor confidentiality of others.
  • Refrain from giving advice.
  • Agree that you are not currently having thoughts of harming yourself or others (or if you are, agreement to share and pursue safety plans to prevent harm).
  • Mute yourself when not speaking.
  • Turn on your camera to allow for optimal facilitation.

Who should attend?

Anyone who would like to learn skills to be more in control of their emotions and the ways they interact with people in their lives. This is not a counseling group and is not a substitute for either individual or group counseling. However, participants are welcomed and encouraged to ask questions and share examples of how they have used skills. Students may attend as many or as few sessions as they like and may attend group or individual counseling concurrently. See SHAW’s main page for information on accessing counseling services, depending on your location and/or your insurance.

This workshop is accessible to anyone regardless of location during remote learning.

Registration

Please register for this workshop by calling SHAW at any time prior to the session you would like to attend. This allows us to keep the group to 10 participants maximum and for us to send you the secure link to join prior to the start of the session. All sessions will be locked at 5 minutes past the hour, so please be sure to arrive on time.

Questions?

Call SHAW to register or to consult and find out if this workshop meets your needs. 641-269-3230


Mindfulness

Mindfulness skills help us observe what is happening in the present moment without judgment. This in turn helps us be more effective in our daily lives. Mindfulness also helps us bridge the gap between our rational and emotional minds.

Distress Tolerance

Developing distress tolerance skills can help us better manage crises. When we feel overwhelmed or pained by events, urges, and emotions and have to deal with circumstances we don’t want to deal with, we can employ distress tolerance skills to get through the moment.

Emotion Regulation

Emotion regulation skills are about understanding and naming emotions, reducing the intensity of the emotions we struggle with, managing emotional extremes, and reducing vulnerability to intense emotions by engaging in proactive behaviors.

Interpersonal Effectiveness

Interpersonal effectiveness skills help us learn how to deal with conflict, to get our needs and wants met, and to get better at saying no while respecting ourselves, respecting others, and maintaining others’ respect for us.


Schedule

Noon–1 p.m. CT
April 28 - Interpersonal Effectiveness: identifying priorities in conflict
May 5 - No workshop this week
May 12 - Interpersonal Effectiveness: maintaining and improving relationships
May 19 - Distress Tolerance: radical acceptance

 

Support Groups

Only available to students residing in Iowa. Must meet with SHAW counselor to be enrolled.

This group provides therapeutic counseling for students who self-identify as Black, indigenous, or as people of color. The aim of this group is to connect members with one another to identify challenges and strengths of BIPOC students and their mental health. This group honors the needs for self-preservation in times of racial stress, and for culturally relevant, radical self-care.

Facilitator: Hodan Farah (Hodie) Staff Counselor
When: Tuesdays noon–1 p.m., starting March 9 (Spring 2 - 2021)
Where: Zoom — link sent after enrollment meeting
Who: Students currently located in Iowa who identify as BIPOC. Interested students should call 641-269-3230 to schedule a short meeting with Hodie to discuss enrolling.

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